VINTAGE OWNER'S MANUALS, SERVICE MANUALS, BROCHURES AND PUBLICATIONS
FAQ
Your Recent Purchases
Contact Us
Home
Welcome to Automatic Ephemera, an independent organization/library for historical research and education, sharing public domain documents relating to vintage products.


 


Please search through our database, we have hundreds of available documents...

Search Publisher: 
   Restrict to Product: 

Full Text Search of Automatic Ephemera:   

Clear and Start New Search


Review Selections & Checkout


1974 Hotpoint Kitchen and Laundry Planning Guide


Published by Hotpoint in 1974-- The spirit of '74 shows up in this sales literature guide showing kitchens decorated as 1774, 1874, 1974 and 2074. Of course they all look very mid 1970's, but that's part of this book's charm.

A growing family? A new home with an outdated kitchen? A need for new appliances? Whatever your reason for planning a new kitchen, you will want one that is easy to work in and fun to be in. You'll want practicality, plus style. That's the idea behind the Spirit of 74. It's the can-do spirit that insists on a kitchen suited exactly to you and to your family's living style. This Hotpoint Kitchen/Laundry Planning Guide will help you interpret your Spirit of '74. It will explain some of the fundamentals of planning a workable kitchen, give you some decorating ideas. and tell you how to translate your plan to paper. so a contractor or kitchen designer can carry it out. Read through this book. Then talk to your Hotpoint dealer. He can show you appliances in the proper spirit, appliances that you will be proud of for years to come. If you're planning a new kitchen, now is the time to discover your true spirit.

Number of Pages: 25
File Size: 29mb
Download Fee: $4.99

  Add 1974 Hotpoint Kitchen and Laundry Planning Guide to cart
Please note that all publications presented here at Automatic Ephemera are on average between 35 and 85 years old. This information is presented as a educational/historical reference on vintage products of the past. Any trademarks or brand names appearing on this site are for nominative use to accurately describe the content contained in these publications. The associated trademarks are the sole property of their registered owners as there is no affiliation between Automatic Ephemera and these companies. No connection to or endorsement by the trademark owners is to be construed.


Review Selections & Checkout

Here is an automated summary of some of the text contained in:
1974 Hotpoint Kitchen and Laundry Planning Guide
Published in 1974

Important: Please note the summary text below was created by electronically reading the scanned images with optical character recognition software (ocr). OCR technolgoy is not yet perfected and you might see some spelling and formatting errors in the preview text below. These errors are not actually in the final product, the download file you will receive is a pure clean high-resolution scan of the original document, containing all text, graphics and photos exactly as originally printed.
Page 1:

Hotpoint Kitchen and Laundry Planning

Page 2:

Contents

3 Spirit of '74

4 Activity Centers

5 Work Triangle

6 Getting in Shape

7 Spirit and Style

8 Spirit Of 1774

9 Spirit of 1874

10 Spirit of 1974

11 Spirit of 2074

12 A Place for Everything

13 Light Up Your Life

14 Room for Dining

15 Do's and Don'ts

16 Plan a Laundry

17 Laundry Locations

18 Put it On Paper

19 Appliance Templates

20 Cabinet Templates

21 Cabinet Dimensions

22 Hotpoint Distributors

23 Hotpoint 1974
Page 3:

THE SPIRIT OF '74

A growing family? A new home with an outdated kitchen? A need for new appliances? Whatever your reason for planning a new kitchen, you will want one that is easy to work in and fun to be in. You'll want practicality, plus style.

That's the idea behind the Spirit of '74. It's the can-do spirit that insists on a kitchen suited exactly to you and to your family's living style. This Hotpoint Kitchen/Laundry Planning Guide will help you interpret your Spirit of '74.

It will explain some of the fundamentals of planning a workable kitchen, give you some decorating ideas, and tell you how to translate your plan to paper, so a contractor or kitchen designer can carry it out.

Read through this book. Then talk to your Hotpoint dealer. He can show you appliances in the proper spirit, appliances that you will be proud of for years to come.

If you're planning a new kitchen, now is the time to discover your true spirit.
Page 4:

Activity Centers

Every kitchen is organized around three main centers of activity-cooking, refrigeration and clean-up. These most important kitchen tasks should be coordinated in your new kitchen to help you save time and unnecessary steps.

Each activity center, therefore, should contain the major appliances, foods and other supplies used in that activity, plus cabinets to store it all.

The most frequently used center is the Clean-up Center. It includes a dishwasher, sink and disposer for food wastes and compactor or waste basket for bottles, cans and paper. Stored in this area will be foods that need to be washed or soaked, as well as space for everyday dishes, utensils and cleaning supplies.

If you are remodeling in stages, you may have budgeted some appliances for later installation. If so, place a cabinet of the right size for easy replacement by the appliance at a later date. You will need to allow 15" for a compactor, 24" for a dishwasher. Advance planning also provides the necessary electrical and water connections for these appliances.

The Refrigeration Center is best located in the part of the kitchen near the garage or service entrance, to save steps when carrying in groceries to be stored in and around the refrigerator. This center is also a good location for a baking/mixing center, with space for a mixer, mixing bowls, measuring cups, rolling pin, baking

pans, sugar, flour and other baking supplies.

The Cooking Center is organized around the range or surface cooking unit. Provide space for foods needing cooking; small appliances; pots, pans and trays; and cookies, breads and crackers.

Ideally, the cooking center should be as near as possible to the area where most family meals are served.

All other kitchen activities-dining, pet's feeding area, message/desk center-should be planned so they do not interfere with the main kitchen activities.

a Clean-up Center. Plan a minimum of 24 inches of working counter at each side of the sink. If possible, allow 30" to provide sufficient storage and work surface.

b The Refrigeration Center. Allow at least 15 inches at the open side of the refrigerator for a working counter. If a baking mixing area is planned, allow 30-42" of counter space.

c The Cooking Center. Allow 24 inches of counter space at the side of the range adjoining another activity center. On the other side, allow 12" to 15" of space. Between a wall oven and surface unit, allow a minimum of 9" for setting hot pans. A more remote wall oven should include a counter or shelf of at least 15" next to it.
Page 5:

Work Triangle

In a carefully planned kitchen, movement between the activity centers should be unobstructed. To keep this main work area free of outside activities, draw in an imaginary work triangle between the three centers.

To establish the triangle, measure from the center of the sink to the center of the refrigerator to the center

of the range and back to the sink.

The total triangle measurement should be between 13 feet and 22 feet-with no single arm measuring less than 4' 6" or more than 1' 3".

This triangle represents the sequence of work from one activity center to the next-from storage, to washing and preparing foods, to cooking, to serving, and back to clean-up. If possible, miscellaneous activities and traffic flow through the room should not cross through the work triangle.
Page 6:

GETTING IN SHAPE

Choose one of the four basic kitchen shapes. There are four kitchen configurations which, when correctly planned, incorporate the basic planning principles. Each has many variations; for example, the U-shaped kitchen can be round or octagonal, whole or broken.

Study each plan for the location of the three main activity centers- Cooking, Refrigeration and Clean-Up

- and check the work triangle for each. Evaluate the ease of movement, the traffic pattern, and your special requirements to determine which kitchen shape will best suit your needs.

The L-Shaped Kitchen, utilizing two walls, allows great flexibility in placement of appliances, snack and storage areas. It is an excellent plan for large kitchens, and for kitchens used by more than one cook. At best, this kitchen's continuity of work sequence is unbroken by doorways.

The U-Shaped Kitchen is often used in connection with a family room or breakfast nook, using one arm of the "U" as a room-dividing peninsula.

This plan is well adapted for use by only one cook. It may require more floor space than other plans; and, as in all kitchens, the aisle should be at least 4 feet wide.

The Corridor Kitchen adapts readily to long, narrow kitchens, like those found in many modern homes and apartments. An aisle of at least 48 inches is recommended, and if possible one end should be closed off to prevent casual traffic from moving through the work triangle.

The One Wall Kitchen is often seen in studio apartments or summer homes, or wherever space is very limited. It also combines well with a family room or open plan arrangement. In this plan, special care must be taken to provide enough storage and counter space in each main activity center.

One-Wall Kitchen

Refrigerator

Portable Dishwasher

Sink

Range

U-Shaped Kitchen
Page 7:

Once your kitchen is planned for efficiency, you can plan its style-the theme, color scheme and individual accessories that will make this kitchen uniquely yours-

Today there is no one style. You can design a kitchen with the look of the Orient or of Spain-with the spirit of 1774 or 2074. To choose a style that suits your spirit, consult decorating magazines and books or an expert- architect or Certified Kitchen Designer.

Color and accessories will enhance the style you choose. Color, for example, adds life and sets the mood

- cool greens to soothe a busy homemaker, or appetite-provoking oranges. And, don't forget that Hotpoint appliances are color-designed to complement most color schemes.

Accessories supply the touch of individuality. Show off your copperware mugs or favorite collection, and save cabinet space at the same time.

Grow herbs and spices on the windowsill; they're decorative and will add a gourmet touch to your meals.

What kind of kitchen would you Hike to have? On the next four pages, are the "Spirit of '74" kitchens from Hotpoint. We hope they'll give you more ideas for your new kitchen.
Page 8:

1774

The Spirit of 1774 lends gracious dignify to this English Colonial Kitchen. The beauty of a homemaker's cherished antique china soup tureen and plates sets the tone. The brown and white of the china is reflected in the tile floor, brown cabinets with white

trim, white appliances and rich gold walls. Carefully selected Colonial accessories add their charm to the Spirit of '74.

The decorating style may be eighteenth century, but the living style is set firmly in the present. This homemaker has all the convenience of today, with Hotpoint dishwasher, disposer and compactor, plus a High/Lo range featuring a bottom microwave oven in addition to the standard eye-level
Page 9:

1874

The pioneer spirit of 1874 still reigns in America's Southwest. An adobe wall with inset hearth, beamed ceiling, Mexican pattern tile floor, wood paneling and cabinets with wrought iron hardware interweave Western and the Spanish traditions.

Sunny colors add warmth to this simply-furnished kitchen, with its Avocado Hotpoint appliances, pine cabinets, orange curtains and avocado, orange and yellow vinyl floor.

Copper cookware displayed handsomely against the adobe wall and groupings of cactus add to the Southwestern motif. And despite the burning sun outside, the Hotpoint room air conditioner keeps the kitchen cool. The refrigerator's through-the-door dispenser gives quick access to ice for a refreshing drink, and a countertop oven cooks a quick snack, without heating up the kitchen.
Page 10:

1974

The Spirit of 1974 features up-to-date style and efficiency. The bold contemporary pattern of the easy-clean vinyl wallpaper, the soft-on-the feet carpeting, wipe-clean TextoliteŽ counters, and flush door cabinets make this kitchen a joy,

A sliding glass door decorated with a tree design prevents a dead-end look in this corridor kitchen. Behind the door is a separate laundry room. Harvest Gold Hotpoint appliances accent the white, avocado and lime green of this kitchen, adding a touch of sunshine.

The Hotpoint convertible dishwasher looks built-in when not in use, extending the practical counter space with its handy butcher block surface. Load it at the table, then roll it to the sink when the dishes need washing.
Page 11:

2074

The Spirit of 2074 brings the future a step closer. This streamlined circular version of the basic U-shaped kitchen is a free-standing modular island, with open access to the rest of the home.

The bold white surfaces are vinyl-covered for easy cleaning, and the vinyl floor needs no waxing. Gold and red accent colors sweep around the circular shapes in contemporary "Supergraphics" designs.

Homemaking convenience is 21st Century too, with the versatility of two standard Hotpoint ovens plus a built-in microwave oven, as well as a complete Clean-up Center including a Hotpoint disposer, compactor and dishwasher.
Page 12:

A PLAN FOR EVERYTHING

The storage ideas shown here are suggested to help you organize many kitchen items. These storage accessories can be ordered as options when you buy new cabinets or purchased separately in housewares departments of local.stores.. (a) Sliding shelves for pots and pans, (b) Pan rack helps avoid clatter stacking of casseroles and pans, (c) Pan lid rack on inner cabinet door, (d) Cutting board - built-in or portable, (e) Tray cabinet stores serving trays, cookie sheets, cooling racks in as little as 9 inches of width, (f) Moveable utensil and accessory stand, or utensil rack on wall

(g) Vegetable and fruit bins neatly stack, pull out, (h) Single action faucet set can include spray and detergent or hand lotion dispenser.

(i) Adjustable shelves adapt to changing storage requirements, (j) Plate rack helps prevent chipping, eases removal of plates, (k) Cup hooks or slide-out cup rack keep cups handy.

(l) Cabinets without center stiles (vertical dividers) give easier access, (m) Sub-shelf for cups, dessert dishes, s(mall glasses, avoids stacking, (n) Shallow shelves prevent double decking items, (o) Under-cabinet dispenser for waxed paper, paper towel.

(p) Utensil drawer is compartmentalized, (q) Silverware drawer lined with tarnish-proof cloth, (r) Pull-out bottle shelf, (s) Built-in flour bin. (t) Bag rack on inner door, (u) Compactor or waste container, (v) Double-tier spice rack, (w) Recipe rack moves into position for easy reading, (x) Glass sliding doors on peninsula cabinet allow passage of light, (y) Lazy Susan shelves in corner keep items handy to reach.

Cabinet in mini mixing/baking center stores portable appliances behind sliding glass doors for easy access. Top part of the cabinet stores spices and other baking supplies.

Wine rack and cannisters are storage aids that can be as decorative as they are practical.

Center island includes extra storage space, including a slot for serving trays.

Skillets and pans store conveniently on wall rack.
Page 13:

LIGHT UP YOUR LIFE

Every kitchen needs adequate lighting, including natural sunlight and electric lighting. You will need general overhead illumination and localized lighting above each major work area.

General lighting should be even, reducing the brightness contrast between work centers and surrounding areas and lighting the insides of cabinets. Use ceiling-mounted or suspended fixtures in a small kitchen or built-in fluorescent lighting around the kitchen perimeter. Luminous ceilings afford excellent overall light and distinctiveness.

Provide local lighting over the sink, range (in range hood), above each

food preparation center [installed beneath wall cabinet) and over the dining area.

Kitchen windows should be large; an unusual and effective variation is a skylight, a window in the ceiling shedding natural sunlight down into the room.

This kitchen is generously lighted, with a decorative overhead fixture and local lighting over the range and under cabinets onto work counters. A window adds natural light and provides a view.

Reflector flood lights recessed in soffit are spaced 20 inches apart over the length of the counter, providing local lighting to the inside of wall cabinets and onto the work surfaces.

Light built into range hood illuminates cooking surface, so you can see better.

Modern decorative light fixture focuses light on the island work surface.
Page 14:

ROOM FOR DINING

Almost every family likes to have some type of dining area in or near the kitchen. It's a good idea to separate this area from the working kitchen by a decorative divider that allows transfer of light, but hides unavoidable kitchen clutter.

If a table and chairs are to be used, there should be at least 2-1/ 2 feet of space around the table to allow comfortable movement and seating at the table. If there is no room for a table and chairs, include a counter or breakfast bar. A dining counter is usually 29 inches high with chairs and 36 to 42 inches high with bar stools of appropriate height. The counter should be 15" deep if used

just for dining, and 30" if the other side of the counter is used for meal preparation or serving,

A service center can be built under the snack bar with storage for tableware, linens, serving pieces, and portable appliances like the toaster and coffeemaker. If you plan for table and chairs, the base cabinets dividing the kitchen from the dining area can be the serving/storage area.

A simple counter extension provides space for meals, and doubles as a desk for planning the day's menu.

A table and chairs provides a welcome place to sit and chat with neighbors or family.
Page 15:

DO'S AND DONT'S

The suggestions given below are hints that may help you plan a more efficient kitchen - one that is safe and convenient.

Place sink far

enough away from range or oven

ra Install range away from open end of cabinets to minimize chances of spills. Plan for sufficient electrical outlets so wires don't stretch across counters or aisles.

Include a 5

as the control center for your home. Jot down grocery lists, quick notes to a friend and organize your household bills. Include a place for posting messages.

Vary Cabinets Arrange shallow units as a room divider near sink or range. Divider can cut off view to kitchen's clutter, still allowing visibility from the kitchen to breakfast nook.

Help avoid danger of burns or scalds and to avoid having too many people in one area at a time.

Space between wall studs can be planned for storage of many household items - ironing boards, canned goods. Shelves as shallow as 4 inches can be most convenient.

Don't let chimney, clothes chute, heating ducts, or pipes spoil your plan. Install cabinets around and near these obstacles to hold brooms, trays or liquor.

Install a hutch near family dining area to store countertop appliances. Use space between wall and base cabinets by installing shallow cabinets with sliding doors under wall cabinets.

Include a work counter near the built-in oven on which you can place baking dishes, roasting pans and serving dishes. A minimum of nine inches, more if possible, is recommended.

Don't design a narrow kitchen aisle, so that open cabinet and appliance doors impede work patterns, the minimum recommended aisle is 48 inches

Don't let the kitchen doors open against the face of appliances, hinge door from the opposite side of the jamb or use a sliding door.

Don't place dishwasher around the corner from the sink, blocking access to the sink.

Don't plan problem corners like a range and dishwasher at right angles. The operation

of their doors will interfere with each other.

Don't install dishwasher next to refrigerator if you con avoid it. Hot humid air from dishwasher can make refrigerator overwork
Page 16:

A laundry should be planned with the same general "activity center" principles used in the kitchen. The efficient laundry includes (1) soiled clothes storage, sorting and preparation center, (2) washing center and drying center, (3) ironing center with a place to hang things (4) clean clothes storage or linen closet.

This compact, one-wall laundry area, entered through the sliding glass decorator door at the end of the kitchen, includes the four activity centers. The base cabinet at the left side is a hamper. There is adequate

counter space for treating stains and sorting clothes. Wall cabinets provide storage for laundry supplies above the washer and for folded linens over the dryer. Additional countertop gives space for folding and hanging clothes.

Although handy to the kitchen and decorated in the same style and color scheme, the laundry is separate from the kitchen and its activities.
Page 17:

LAUNDRY LOCATIONS

Laundry facilities may be located in one of several areas in the home. Remember, however, that the dryer must be vented to discharge lint and hot, humid air to the outside. Second, there is much more than just washing and drying to do in the laundry area; include space for pre-washing, ironing and sewing where space permits.

Convenient locations for laundry areas include: 1) in a hallway serving the bedroom area, near a water source and other venting. 2) near the kitchen where all water using appliances are reasonably close together. 3) in the basement, as part of the housekeeping room, 4) in the utility room near the kitchen and back door, or 5) in the bathroom behind decorative doors or screen.

Page 18:

PUT IT ON PAPER

If you are planning to remodel an existing kitchen or convert all or part of an existing room into a kitchen, measure the kitchen or room according to the procedure outlined below. All measurements must be accurate, because this is the base for your new kitchen; incorrect measurements can mean costly changes later.

Draw the outline of the room on scratch paper. Then, starting at any corner of the room, use a ruler or yardstick to measure at a convenient height and mark all dimensions on your outline drawing.

Carefully note all irregularities - chimneys, closets, pipe raceways, radiator and any other structural items. Indicate the location of light switches and electrical outlets, exhaust fans, heat registers and plumbing. Door and window dimensions should include trim and indicate distance from floor to window sill.

As you measure, determine what is inside the walls, such as gas, electric or water pipes, duct work, stacking and chimneys, by careful examination of the area all around the kitchen. Usually it is less expensive to plan around those items than it is to change them.

If your next kitchen is in a new location, room addition or new home, work from your architect's or contractor's prints. Check all dimensions and details carefully before you start to plan and certainly before you order any cabinets or appliances.

Using the Kitchen-Laundry layout grid sheet from this guide, carefully lay out the perimeter of the kitchen from your measurements. Use the scaled rule found on the transparent grid. Be sure to indicate exact location of doors (and which way they swing), windows, plumbing and other features that will influence your plan.

Try more than one arrangement on scratch paper and in each one check the work centers, work triangle and traffic patterns. Study your arrangements and determine which one best fits your requirements.

After deciding on the best plan, place the transparent grid, with your kitchen's outline drawn on it, over the appropriate part of the appliance template (on page 19). Trace the three main centers (refrigeration, cooking and clean-up) into the position where you want them and fill in the remaining areas, using the cabinet templates on page 20.

Laundry Planning can be handled in a similar way on the same, or another, grid sheet. The basic units of the laundry-the washer and dryer-could be placed in the best location and other facilities planned . to fit the remaining area.
Page 19:

Appliance Templates

For new appliances, be sure to consult specification literature for cut-out dimensions, required clearances and exact size of the model(s) you intend to purchase. For appliances you now own and plan to keep, measure unit accurately; indicate refrigerator door swing. Be careful to avoid boxing refrigerator in corner with door opening wrong way. Call on your Hotpoint Kitchen Specialist or Hotpoint Dealer for planning assistance, appliance suggestions and financing advice for your new kitchen.

NOTE: Be sure to consult specification literature for cut-out dimensions, required clearances and exact size of the model(s) you intend to purchase.
Page 20:

CABINET TEMPLATES

Templates for typical base and wall cabinet sections are given below. For exact cabinet dimensions, refer to the specification sheets of the manufacturer whose cabinets you expect to use. When drawing in cabinets, remember not to put cabinets across doors or windows. Note the corner fillers; they are necessary for positive operation of doors and drawers.

Base Cabinets-Scale: 3/8" = 1 Ft. (As viewed from above)

Straight corner "Blind Right"

NOTE: Corner fillers are necessary for positive operation of doors and drawers.

Wall Cabinet - Scale: 3/8" = 1 Ft. (As viewed from above)

Straight comer;

filler needed to turn corner

Continuous Counter for sink, surface range or snack 8 bar

Check manufacturer's specification literature for exact dimensions
Page 21:

CABINET DIMENSIONS

The view below is of a cross-section of a cabinet, indicating height and depth. Possible lengths are included on page 20, Cabinet Templates, Be sure to check your cabinet manufacturer's specifications for exact dimensions.

Some common planning marks are shown below. Use to help explain the location of your facilities.

Lighting fixture: ceiling light centrally located-for general illumination, or wall light over sink. Choice depends on window and cabinet arrangement. Additional lights under cabinets often are desirable.

Duplex convenience outlet. Plan one for each four feet or major fraction of working counter frontage.

Light switch-numeral indicates number needed.

Kitchen clock outlet.

Ventilating fan.

Electric outlet.
Page 23:

'74 HOTPOINT APPLIANCES

Hallmark 30" Hi/Low Range

Built-In Dishwasher

Side by Side Food Center
Page 24:

Disposall Food Waste Disposer

Lady Executive Washer and Automatic Dryer

Compactor

Microwave Oven

Heritage Room Air Conditioner


Here are the 25 most recent documents added to the library...
Add
High-Res
Download
to Cart
Click Thumbnail for More Information Title
and
Description
Product Year # of Pages File
Size
Download
Fee
Add to download cart
Thumbnail Image of Download Electrical Merchandising Magazine - November 1954
Electrical Merchandising is a fun magazine to read for any collector or enthusiast of vintage appliances, electronics and other vintage home products. This highly entertaining magazine covered the retail sales and merchandising areas of Major Appliances, Small Appliances, Small Electrics, Radios, Televisions and other electric home products from the mid-20th century. This was the Life and Look Magazine of the appliance world, in the same large size 10x13 format.

Particularly interesting articles in this issue:

What Can You Do With Washer Trade-ins
An Old Technique Sells Modern Dishwashers
An Automatic In Every Home
New Products announces the 1955 Frigidaire Washer and Dryer Line

Automatic Washer Ads in this issue:
Laundry Queen
Easy
Bendix
Maytag
Hotpoint with a window lid!!
ABC-o-Matic
Frigidaire's New low-priced (the Pulsamatic) Laundry Pair
Apex/Tide Detergent
Blackstone

and

KitchenAid Dishwashers
Trade Publications
Published by:
Electrical Merchandising
1954 248 116mb $12.99
Introductory Price of $8.99


ends in:
2 days
Add to download cart
Thumbnail Image of Download 1969 JCPenny Penncrest Portable Dishwasher Owners Manual
Complete owner's manual and use and care guide to General Electric made Penncrest top-loading dishwashers of the late 1960s.


Dishwashers
Published by:
JCPenny
1969 28 22mb $5.99
Add to download cart
Thumbnail Image of Download 1964 Frigidaire Dishmobile Use and Care Guide
Here is the operating instructions to the portable version of one of Frigidaire's last spray tube dishwashers. Model DW-DMH


Dishwashers
Published by:
Frigidaire
1964 4 18mb $5.99
Add to download cart
Thumbnail Image of Download 1959 Westinghouse Roll-About Dishwashers Owners Manual
Here is a rare find, complete owners manual to the Westinghouse portable top-loading dishwashers of the late 1950s.

Models include: PDW-103 and PDW-102.
Dishwashers
Published by:
Westinghouse
1959 20 13mb $5.99
Add to download cart
Thumbnail Image of Download 1983 Miele Laundry Appliances Catalog
This is a German language catalog highlighting the 1983 Miele line of front-loading and horizontal-access top loading automatic washers, twin-tub washers, clothes dryers, centrifugal extractors and ironers.

Models include:

Washers/Spinners: W784, W783, W780, W770, W760, W753, W751, W484, W481, W480, W475S, W473, WZ257.

Dryers: T388C, T384, T382C, T380, T377C, T370, T368C, T364, T363, T361.

Ironers: B864E, B862E.
Automatic Washers & Dryers
Published by:
Miele
1983 40 69mb $5.99
Add to download cart
Thumbnail Image of Download 1977 Sears Kenmore Dishwasher Brochure
Sales literature brochure which was available in Sears retail stores to highlight their 1977 line of Built in and portable dishwashers. Also included is a second brochure with 18" dishwashers!


Dishwashers
Published by:
Kenmore
1977 8 5mb $5.99
Add to download cart
Thumbnail Image of Download 1960 Philco Electric Range Brochure
Here is a sales literature brochure to beatufiul mid-century styled ranges. Full images and specifications are included for the entire 1960 Philco line.

Models include: SS-4098, SS-4097, SS-4095, SS-4094, SS-4093, SS-3097, SS-3095, SS-3094, SS-3092, SS-2095.

Please note the originals had some minor water damage on them so there are some water spots or slightly blurry spots. However these are still very readable and super fun to look at.
Ranges/Stoves
Published by:
Philco
1960 16 26mb $7.99
Add to download cart
Thumbnail Image of Download Maytag Merchandiser 1975 Vol 2
Here is a fascinating magazine style publication by Maytag highlighting product features and sales literature.

This issue includes:

Introducing new limited time "Drop-In" Maytag Automatic Washers, models A106F, A107B and A407B.

Maytag Advertising Banners

New Value Brochure

Maytag News including: Agitator Shaft Improved, Color Shading Changes, etc.

Maytag Value

The Maytag Dishwasher Belt, an Industry First!

The Maytag Fabric-Matic Automatic Washers, A107 and A407

Know Your Dryer Controls

The Confusion in Care Labels

The Satisfied Customer

The Power Module, The "Helical Drive" of the Dishwasher

Sales Ideas

New Magazine Ads

Service News

Dishwasher Selling Guide

New Maytag Dishwashers with the remarkable Power Module.

Maytag Crossword Puzzle!

New Maytag Indoor Clock
Automatic Washers & Dryers
Published by:
Maytag
1975 24 36mb $5.99
Add to download cart
Thumbnail Image of Download James and Universal Dishwasher Service Manual
Here is a rare find, it's the complete service manual to all James and Universal (gas range slide-in) dishwashers. Information includes how to properly use the dishwasher, explanation of each component, troubleshooting and complete servicing including wiring diagrams.

Models include: APJ-1, BDL, 9900, 9921, 9902, 9904, 9905, 9906.
Dishwashers
Published by:
James
1956 67 93mb $5.99
Add to download cart
Thumbnail Image of Download Facts You Should Know About Your New General Electric Disposall
Owners manual and operating instructions for the 1952 GE Food Waste Disposer.


Food Waste Disposers
Published by:
General Electric
1950 12 7mb $4.99
Add to download cart
Thumbnail Image of Download 1960 Philco Automagic Washer Brochures
Here are some beautiful brochures for the 1960 line of Philco Automagic Washers. Illustrations and Specifications included.

Models shown: W-208, W-206, W-204, W-202 and W-200.

Please note the originals had some minor water damage on them so there are some water spots or slightly blurry spots. However these are still very readable and super fun to look at.
Automatic Washers
Published by:
Philco
1960 14 22mb $5.99
Add to download cart
Thumbnail Image of Download 1959 Philco Duomatic Combination Washer-Dryer Brochure
Here is a wonderful brochure for the Philco's first 27" combination washer/dryer. Illustrations and Specs included for model: CE-794.


Combination Washer/Dryers
Published by:
Philco
1959 4 39mb $5.99
Add to download cart
Thumbnail Image of Download 1960 Philco Automagic Dryer Brochures
Here are some beautiful brochures for the 1960 line of Philco Automagic Dryers. Illustrations and Specifications included.

Models shown: DE-608, DE-606, DE-604, DE-602 and DE-600.

Please note the originals had some minor water damage on them so there are some water spots or slightly blurry spots. However these are still very readable and super fun to look at.
Clothes Dryers
Published by:
Philco
1960 10 15mb $5.99
Add to download cart
Thumbnail Image of Download Early Frigidaire Refrigerator Service Manual Vol-1 1925 to 1936
This is a three volume comprehensive service manual for Frigidaire Refrigerators from the 1920's thru 1951. The set is a fascinating historical look at early Frigidaire home refrigeration.

Volume 1 Covers:
Refrigerators prior to 1933 (Low Side Float System),

1933 to 1936 Reciprocating Models (High Side Float System),

1933 to 1936 Rotary Models (Restrictor System)

Manual contains mechanical and refrigeration theory and primer, model images and specifications, wiring diagrams, troubleshooting and full servicing information.

VOLUME 2 is located here for the 1937-1942.
VOLUME 3 is located here for the post-war models.

Models mentioned in Volume 1:
P-4, AP-5, AP-6, AP-7-1, AP-7-2, AP-9, AP-12, AP-18, B-5, B-5-2, B-9, B-15, D-4, D-5, D-6, D-7-2, D-9, D-12, L-5, LP-5, M-5, M-5-2, M-7, M-9, M-12, M-15, MP-5, MP-7, MP-9, MP-12, MP-15, P-9, P-15, PT-5, T-5, TP-5, V-5, EE-5, VP-5, I, G-3, G-4, GR-4, G-5, G-6, MC-9, MC-12, W-3, W-4, W-5, W-6, W-8, W-10, W-12, W-18, WP-7, WP-8, WP-10, WP-13, WA-3, WPA-3, AHM-3330, AHM-4830, AHM-4840, AHM-5340, AHM-5750, ML-37, ML-48, ML-64, ML-4837, ML-4848, ML-5764, ML-4, ML-5, ML-6, ML-4840, ML-4850, ML-5760, S-4, S-5, S-6, WP-4, WP-5, WP-6, WP-18, SD-4, SD-6, S-4840, S-4850, S-5760, SL-43, SL-63, SL-73.
Refrigerators/Freezers
Published by:
Frigidaire
1951 184 177mb $8.99
Add to download cart
Thumbnail Image of Download Early Frigidaire Refrigerator Service Manual Vol-2 1937 to 1942
This is a three volume comprehensive service manual for Frigidaire Refrigerators from the 1920's thru 1951. The set is a fascinating historical look at early Frigidaire home refrigeration.

Volume 2 Covers:
Rotary Compressor Analysis
Miscellanous and Supplimentary Information
Full descriptions of 1937, 1938, 1939, 1940, 1941 and 1942 model refrigerators.

Manual contains mechanical and refrigeration theory and primer, model images and specifications, wiring diagrams, troubleshooting and full servicing information.

VOLUME 1 is located here for the earliest models.
VOLUME 3 is located here for the post-war models.

Models mentioned in Volume 2:
1937 Refrigerators:
Dulux Finished Cabinets
D 3-37 Master 4-37
DRS 5-37 Master 5-37
DRS 6-37 Master 6-37
DRS 7-37 Master 7-37
Master 8-37
Porcelain Finished Cabinets
DeLuxe 5-37 DeLuxe 8-37
DeLuxe 6-37 Imperial '37
DeLuxe 7-37

1938 Refrigerators:
Dulux Finished Refrigerators
D3
TD3
Special S-38
Special 6-38
Special 7-38
Master 4-38
Master S-38
Master 6-38
Master 7-38
Master 8-38
Porcelain Finished Refrigerators
DeLuxe S-38 Imperial
DeLuxe 6-38
DeLuxe 7-38 WP-19
DeLuxe 8-38

1939 Refrigerators:
DA Model Refrigerators:
TDA-3
DA-3
DA-4
Super Value 6-39.
Special Model Refrigerators:
Special 5-39
Special 6-39
Master Model Refrigerators :
Master 4-39
Master 5-39
Master 6-39
Master 8-39
Cold-Wall Model Refrigerators:
Cold-Wall 6-39
(Dulux Exterior)
Cold-Wall8-39
(Dulux Exterior)
Cold-Wall5-39
(Porcelain Exterior}
Cold-Wall 6-39
(Porcelain Exterior)
Cold-Wall8-39
(Porcelain Exterior)
Cold-Wall Imperial and WP-19.

1940 Refrigerators:
Table Top Model:
TDB-3
Super Value Refrigerators:
sv 3
SV4
sv 6-40
sv 8-40
Master Refrigerators:
M 5-40
M 6-40
DeLuxe Refrigerators:
D 5-40
D 6-40
Cold-Wall Master Refrigerators:
CWM 5-40
CWM 6-40
Cold-Wall DeLuxe Refrigerators:
CWD 6-40
CWD 8-40
Cold-Wall Imperial Refrigerators:
CWI 6-40
CWI 8-40
CWI 13
WP-19

1941 Refrigerators:
1941 "S" and "R" Model Refrigerators:
(See Table I-VI.)
S 3 (Flat top only) See 1940 TDB-3
S 4
S 6-41
R 6-41
1941 "M" and "L" Model Refrigerators:
(See Table 2-VI)
M 6-41
MP 6-41
L 6-41
L 8-41
1941 Cold-Wall Model Refrigerators:
(See Table 3-VI)
C 6-41
CP 6-41 c 9-41
CD 6-41
CPD 6-41
CPD 9-41
CPD 13-41
WP 19

1942 Refrigerators
AH 6
S 7-42
M7-42
M P7-42
D 7-42
DP 7-42
D 9-42
CD 7-42
CPD 7-42
CPD 9-42
CPD 13
WP 19

Refrigerators/Freezers
Published by:
Frigidaire
1951 177 182mb $8.99
Add to download cart
Thumbnail Image of Download Early Frigidaire Refrigerator Service Manual Vol-3 1945 to 1951
This is a three volume comprehensive service manual for Frigidaire Refrigerators from the 1920's thru 1951. The set is a fascinating historical look at early Frigidaire home refrigeration.

Volume 3 Covers:
Full descriptions of 1945-47 I-Line Refrigerators, 1947-1948 J-Line Refrigerators, 1949 K-Line Refrigerators, 1950 M-Line Refrigerators and 1951 O-Line Refrigerators.

This volume is meant to be used with VOLUME 2 which covers more in-depth theory and servicing of rotary compressor models.

VOLUME 1 is located here for the earliest models.

Manual model images and specifications, wiring diagrams, troubleshooting and full servicing information.

Models mentioned:
1945-1946-1947 Refrigerators:
AHI-4
DI-7
CDI-9
AHI-6
DPI-7
CPDI-7
SI-7
DI-9
CPDI-9
MI-7
CDI-7

1948 Refrigerators:
AJ-6
SJ-6
MJ-6
MJ-7
MJ-9
MJ-11
DJ-7
DJ-9
DJ-11
CIJ-10

1949 Refrigerators:
ML-77
ML-93
DL-70
AL-60
ML-60
ML-77P
ML-93P
ML-115
DL-7
DL-86
DL-86P
DL-105
IL-80
IL-100


1950 Refrigerators:
AM-43,
AM-43F
DM-90
DM-90P
DM-107
DM-107P
MM-92
MM-110
AM-60
MM-74
MM-74P
MM-76
MM-76P
SM-60
SM-76
SM-76P
IM-80
IM-100
1M-lOOP

1951 Refrigerators:
AO-43 Apartment House, 4.3 cu. ft.
AO-43F Apartment House, 4.3 cu. ft., Flat Top
AO-60 Apartment House, 6 cu. ft.
SO-60 Standard, 6 cu. ft.
SO-73 Standard, 7.3 cu. ft.
SO-82 Standard, 8.2 cu. ft.
SO-92 Standard, 9.2 cu. ft.
SO-110 Standard, 11 cu. ft.
MO-71 Master, 7.1 cu. ft.
MO-81 Master, 8.1 cu. ft.
MO-81P Master, 8.1 cu. ft. Porcelain
DO-90 Deluxe, 9 cu. ft.
DO-90P Deluxe, 9 cu. ft. Porcelain
DO-107 Deluxe, 10.7 cu. ft.
IO-80 Imperial, 8 cu. ft.
IO-100 Imperial, 10 cu. ft.
Refrigerators/Freezers
Published by:
Frigidaire
1951 177 182mb $8.99
Add to download cart
Thumbnail Image of Download 1948 Westinghouse Laundromat Automatic Washer Owners Manual
Here is the complete owners manual and use and care guide to the 1948 Westinghouse Laundromat. I believe this was the first Westinghouse front-loading washer model to incorporate a single door design.


Automatic Washers
Published by:
Westinghouse
1948 40 21mb $5.99
Add to download cart
Thumbnail Image of Download 1956 Frigidaire Imperial Washer Owners Manual
Here is a special edition of the 1956 Frigidaire washer owners manual. It was made specifically for the Imperial Unimatic model, WI-56.


Automatic Washers
Published by:
Frigidaire
1956 24 14mb $5.99
Add to download cart
Thumbnail Image of Download 1953 General Electric Washer and Dryer owners manual
Carefree Washdays the GE Way! Complete owners manual and use/care guide to both the 1953 General Electric automatic washer and clothes dryer.


Automatic Washers & Dryers
Published by:
General Electric
1953 68 30mb $5.99
Add to download cart
Thumbnail Image of Download Frigidaire Tech-Talk Introducing the WO-65 Automatic Washer
Here is one of the earliest issues of Tech-Talk (#7). It's main focus is the introduction of the WO-65 Frigidaire Automatic Washer.


Automatic Washers
Published by:
Frigidaire
1950 12 13mb $5.99
Add to download cart
Thumbnail Image of Download 1955 Frigidaire Dryer Tech-Talk Service Manual
Here is the complete service manual to the 1955 models of Frigidaire clothes dryers. Models DV-35 and DV-65.

Complete servicing, troubleshooting and wiring diagrams.
Clothes Dryers
Published by:
Frigidaire
1955 16 14mb $5.99
Add to download cart
Thumbnail Image of Download 1957 Control-Tower Frigidaire Dryer Tech-Talk Service Manual
Here is the complete service manual to the 1957 models of Frigidaire clothes dryers. Models DI-57, DD-57 and DS-57, Di-1-57.

Complete servicing, troubleshooting and wiring diagrams.
Clothes Dryers
Published by:
Frigidaire
1957 24 22mb $5.99
Add to download cart
Thumbnail Image of Download Westinghouse Service Bulletin
Here are some very notable Westinghouse Service Bulletins displaying new Agitator information, model features charts, cycle charts and specifications for Westinghouse Automatic Washers.

Also included is a 1967 Dishwasher Utility bulletin entitled "You and Your New Dishwasher" - Helpful hints to get the best results.
Automatic Washers
Published by:
Westinghouse
1969 23 20mb $5.99
Add to download cart
Thumbnail Image of Download 1960s Hotpoint Washer-Dryer-Dishwasher Identifier
Here are models and images of the following Hotpoint Washers, Dryers and Dishwashers:

Automatic Washers: 1960 to 1963
Dryers: 1960 to 1963
Dishwashers: various 1958 to 1965 models
Automatic Washers & Dryers
Published by:
Hotpoint
1960 31 16mb $5.99
Add to download cart
Thumbnail Image of Download 1962 Dexter Quick-Twin and Standard Wringer Washers Brochures
Whimsical brochures by Dexter highlight features and specifications of their Philco-made wringer washers.

Models include:
3-D9, 3-D9P, 3-D7, 3-D7P, 3-D5, 3-D5P, 3-D3, 3-D3P, 3-D2, 3-D2P, 3-D1, 3-D1P, 1-DO, 1-DOP, 3-D4
Wringer Washers
Published by:
Dexter
1962 16 39mb $5.99

Review Selections & Checkout          --          Continue Browsing the Library

For license and copyright information related to these materials please click here.

Please note that all publications presented here at Automatic Ephemera are on average between 35 and 85 years old. This information is presented as a educational/historical reference on vintage products of the past. Any trademarks or brand names appearing on this site are for nominative use to accurately describe the content contained in these publications. The associated trademarks are the sole property of their registered owners as there is no affiliation between Automatic Ephemera and these companies. No connection to or endorsement by the trademark owners is to be construed.