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On Your Way to Brighter Wash Days


Published by Kenmore in 1969-- Here is a wonderful piece of sales literature available in Sears stores in the late 1960's. It is a total guide to laundering clothes with sections including Preparing Clothes, Laundry Supplies, Ways to Wash Clothes, Ways to Dry and Iron, Laundry Area Planning, Washer and Dryer Buying Guide, Types of Washers and Dryers, Washer and Dryer Design Features, etc.

Adorable cartoon-ish illustrations throughout as well as illustrations of Kenmore laundry appliances from the late 60's.

Number of Pages: 82
File Size: 50mb
Download Fee: $6.00

  Add On Your Way to Brighter Wash Days to cart
Please note that all publications presented here at Automatic Ephemera are on average between 35 and 85 years old. This information is presented as a educational/historical reference on vintage products of the past. Any trademarks or brand names appearing on this site are for nominative use to accurately describe the content contained in these publications. The associated trademarks are the sole property of their registered owners as there is no affiliation between Automatic Ephemera and these companies. No connection to or endorsement by the trademark owners is to be construed.


Review Selections & Checkout

Here is an automated summary of some of the text contained in:
On Your Way to Brighter Wash Days
Published in 1969

Important: Please note the summary text below was created by electronically reading the scanned images with optical character recognition software (ocr). OCR technolgoy is not yet perfected and you might see some spelling and formatting errors in the preview text below. These errors are not actually in the final product, the download file you will receive is a pure clean high-resolution scan of the original document, containing all text, graphics and photos exactly as originally printed.
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On Your Way to Brighter Wash Days --

your complete guide to NEW FIBERS AND FABRICS* NEW LAUNDRY METHODS • LAUNDRY AREA PLANNING

Page 2:

get a good start

What You Stand To Gain

Every product, every appliance has some limitations: things it can do, things it can't do. In this book we shall try to point out, as factually as possible, how to make the most of what you already have in the way of washable clothing and household items; laundry equipment, and space, while introducing you to what's new and what the future holds in Total Clothes Care.

If you are having trouble keeping your "head above water" in sorting out claims for fabrics, finishes, cleaning agents and appliances ...

If you are lost in a sea of garments that don't behave the way the hang tags and advertisements promised...

If your wash-and-wears become wash-and-irons; your nylon slips gray and your foundation garments yellow...

If you have tried all the new washing products without getting a cleaner, brighter wash...

THIS BOOK IS WRITTEN FOR YOU
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table of contents

Page

Section I. Get a Good Start

What You Stand To Gain.............Inside Front Cover

1. Fibers, Fabrics and Finishes.................. 2

2. Water-How to Make It Work For You............. 7

3. Fabric Buying Guide........................... 9

The Right Fabric............................ 9

Construction................................11

Rules of Thumb When Shopping................11

4. Laundry Supplies—

Where They Are Used and Why.................12

Synthetic Detergents........................12

Soaps.......................................13

Water Conditioners (packaged)...............13

Bleach......................................14

Fabric Softeners...........................15

Bluing and Whiteners........................15

Starch......................................16

Special Laundry Products....................17

5. Graying, Yellowing, Heavy Soils, Stains......19

Causes, Prevention and Cures................19

Grayed Laundry..............................19

Yellowing...................................20

Heavy Soil and Ground-In Dirt...............21

Stain Treatment.............................21

6. Before You Wash, Prepare Your Loads............25

How To Sort.................................25

Rules of Thumb..............................25

Size of Load................................26

Section II. Ways To Wash

7. From Scrub Board to Push Button...............27

Conventional Washers........................27

Automatic Washers...........................27

Combination Washer and Dryer................28

8. The Family Wash...............................29

Wash Water Temperature......................29

Amount of Detergent.........................29

Agitation and Spin Speeds...................31

Rinsing.....................................31

Water Level.................................31

Wash Time...................................32

Soaking or Pre-Wash.........................32

Laundry Aids and Dispensers.................33

Washing By Hand.............................33

9. Washing Special Items, Starching, Tinting. .34

Blankets, Woolens, etc......................34

Starching in the Machine....................36

Tinting in the Machine......................36

Page

Section III. Ways To Dry and Iron

10. From Clothesline to Push Button...............37

Automatic Dryers............................37

Advantages of Automatic Dryers..............38

11. Ways To Dry...................................39

On the Line.................................39

Flat Drying.................................39

In the Dryer................................39

Drying Special Items........................41

Bonus Features..............................43

12. Ironing Shortcuts.............................44

Ironing Equipment...........................44

Plan To Make It Easy........................44

Ironing Technique...........................45

Section IV. Laundry Area Planning

13. Providing for Total Clothes Care..............46

Minimum Needs for the Laundry Center .47

The Total Clothes Care Center...............48

The Clutter Room............................49

14. How Much Space Do You Need?

Work Flow...................................51

Minimum Space Requirements..................52

15. Location of the Laundry Center................54

Points to Consider..........................54

Places to Consider..........................54

When You Build..............................63

Section V. Appliance Buying Guide

16. Know What You Are Looking For.................65

Shop and Compare Values.....................66

Take Your Time..............................68

Types of Washers and Dryers.................68

17. Washer and Dryer Design Features..............69

Automatic Washers...........................69

Automatic Dryers............................71

Combination Washer Dryers...................72

Conventional Washers........................72

18. Before You Call The Serviceman................73

First Aid for the Washer....................73

If the Machine Won't Run....................73

First Aid for the Dryer.....................75

The Combination Washer-Dryer................75

General Index...................................76

How To Plan Your Own Laundry Area...............78

1
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Section I Get a Good Start

Fibers

Fibers are the tiny, hair-like filaments that make up the thread or yarn from which fabrics are constructed. Fabrics gain their properties from the fibers, type of weave and finish, which may be incorporated in the fiber or applied to the completed fabric.

Natural Fibers

Not too long ago most fibers came from the land-cotton, linen, hemp and jute; or from animals-wool, silk, mohair, camel hair and cashmere.

Cotton is more widely used than any other fiber. It is strong, absorbs great amounts of water, has a good white color and dyes easily. Even delicate weaves such as batiste hold up under repeated laundering. Cotton also is inexpensive. However, it is subject to rot and mildew unless specially treated. Untreated cotton has no "memory," or ability to return to shape. Linen has properties similar to cotton.

Wool is not as strong as cotton and is more expensive. But, wool fibers have a "memory" for shape which is why wrinkles "hang-out". Wool is easy to dye, warm to wear. Unless treated, wool is prone to attack by moths. Although wool usually is not considered washable, there are a growing number of truly washable woolens coming onto the market, the result of new processing techniques.

Silk is strong wet or dry, luxurious to the touch and eye and takes dyes beautifully. Because of its high price, silk usually is found only in expensive garments. It is damaged by chlorine bleach, yellows with excessive heat and tends to fade and rot.

Man-Made Fibers

The chemist, intent on bettering nature at her own game and intrigued by the possibility of his altering nature's products, has been able to produce low-cost fibers that combine the best features of wool, cotton, linen and silk.

Rayons

The chemist's first efforts produced "artificial silk," made by treating plant fibers (cellulose) chemically. We know this fiber as rayon.

Spurred on by this success, the chemist found other natural plant materials that could be modified chemically to make rayon with improved appearance and behavior.

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Today's second generation viscose rayons, such as Avril, Zantrel and Lirelle, withstand fairly high washing and drying temperatures but must be washed for shorter times than cotton and may take longer to dry. When combined with cotton they have a luxurious feel and luster.

The aristocrats of the cellulose-based (rayon type) fibers are the acetates (like Estron) and the triacetates (like Arnel). They are silky and dry more quickly than other rayons. They require a short wash period and low ironing temperature. Chlorine bleach damages all types of rayon.

Polyamides (Nylons)

The big breakthrough in test-tube fibers came with the development of nylon in 1937. The strongest fiber known, nylon has strength that compares favorably with that of steel. It resists abrasion, makes the sheerest hosiery and the toughest tow ropes, adds strength to fabrics made from natural fibers.

Polyesters

Dacron, Fortrel, Kodel, Vycron, Dura-lon and other polyesters have high strength and abrasion resistance and, like nylon, can be heat treated to have a

"memory" to return to shape (smoothness, creases and pleats). They can be washed in hot water but should be tumble dried for best results. Combined with other fibers, or alone, they are used in wash-and-wear and permanent press fabrics.

Acrylics and Modacrylics

The acrylics—Orion, Acrilan, Creslan and Sayelle—and the modacrylics— Dynel and Verel, have singled out wool as their principle target. They are lightweight and warm without the scratchy feel of wool, do not mat when washed at moderate temperatures and dried at low temperatures, and are not on the moth's menu.

Polypropylene (Olefins)

Mildew, rot and moth resistant, the olefin fibers—Herculon, Marvess—are appearing as indoor-outdoor carpeting, rope, hosiery and upholstery. Olefins must be dried at the low temperature setting. Check the wash and dry instructions furnished with the item. If you do not have these, use the air setting.

Glass

Glass fiber made its debut in the form of sheer curtains, graduated to semisheer draperies and now appears as draperies and bedspreads. A new, finer fiber now on the market is known as Fiberglas Beta. Some Beta fibers can be washed and dried in the machine at the delicate settings, but the problem of seam slippage is yet to be solved in the finished product. Be sure to check the laundry instructions furnished with the item.

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1 Fibers, Fabrics and Finishes
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Spandex

Spandex—Lycra, Vyrene, Numa—is a textile application of polyurethane. It has stretch and recovery action similar to rubber. However, it yellows with age and heat, a problem that must be solved before it can move into such markets as men's dress shirts. Spandex fibers can be washed with detergents and bleached with oxygen bleaches or peroxide. Chlorine bleach turns it yellow quickly, in one washing. 100% spandex garments are machine washable. Blends of spandex and other yarns must be treated with regard for the most delicate yarn. Refer to instructions received with the garment for specific wash or dry clean instructions.

together they form a thread, string or yarn that can be made into a fabric in a number of different ways.

Woven

Most fabrics found in the home are woven. Such items as sheets, shirts and handkerchiefs are a plain weave. Variations appear as twills, satins, terrycloth, etc., depending on how the warp (lengthwise threads) and woof or filling (crosswise threads) are interlocked.

PLAIN

WEAVE

FILLING

FACED

TWILL

WEAVE

FILLING

FACED

SATIN

WEAVE

New Products, New Problems... Blends

The chemist developed nylon to replace expensive silk hosiery; Dacron and its brothers for permanently pleated skirts; Orion for non-shrink sweaters; Acrilan for moth-proof carpeting, and Fiberglas for curtains that needed no stretching after laundering.

Knitted

In the simplest knitted fabrics one yarn is interlocked with itself in loop-like stitches as in a jersey knit T-shirt and inexpensive socks. More intricate knit patterns, using multiple threads, appear in women's hosiery and lingerie (nylon tricot slips), sweaters, suits and dresses.

FACE

SIDE

OF

JERSEY

REVERSE

SIDE

OF

JERSEY

When thousands of fibers are twisted

He also had a new set of problems. Some man-made fibers are cold in winter, hot in summer; some shrink, some pill, some fade; some will not hold a seam. The solution was to combine any two or more fibers to produce fabrics with the best qualities of each.

4
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Non-Woven

Felt, still used in hats, some outerwear and on pool tables, was the first nonwoven fabric. It cannot be washed. Some of the modern non-woven fabrics, such as Pellon interfacing, are washable.

These types of non-wovens are made up of fibers arranged in a haphazard manner and then bonded together chemically.

Recently, blankets have been made by combining several sheets of non-woven fabric and binding them together by means of a "hooked" needle that passes in and out of the material.

Another fabric just now appearing in this country, under the trade name Malimo, has warp and filling yarns sewn together by a third yarn. Malimo appears to be a knit but behaves like a woven fabric. It can be machine washed and dried.

Bonded

Many types of fabrics, both woven and knitted, in many different fibers are now available with a smooth backing that is "bonded" to the face fabric with an adhesive. The bonding takes the place of a lining and helps retain the shape of knits and gives strength to laces. Most bonded fabrics are not washable, but more washable bonded fabrics are being developed.

Stretch

The principal fibers in stretch fabrics are spandex, textured nylon or mercerized cotton.

Cotton, when mercerized under certain specific conditions, has a modest amount of stretch, enough to make sleepwear more comfortable.

Spandex is replacing rubber for foundation garments, bras and bathing suits.

But the most important stretch material

is nylon yarn made from specially treated nylon. It is durable and withstands high temperatures. If the stretch fabric is all nylon, it can be washed and dried as any other nylon fabric. If it is a blend, the fabric should be treated as you would treat the most delicate fiber in the blend. The most successful stretch blend to date is nylon and one of the acrylics.

More complete information on purchase and care of the various fabrics is given in the chapters "Fabric Buying Guide" beginning on page 9 and "The Family Wash" beginning on page 29.

In addition to developing new fibers and combinations of fibers, the chemist also has found ways of treating the raw fiber, the yarn or the fabric to produce desirable properties.

Almost all fabrics have had some type of treatment or finish. The purpose of a finish may be to impart stiffness, water repellency (Zelan); control wrinkling and set creases (Koratron); soften, control shrinkage (Sanforizing); give spot resistance (Scotchgard, Zepel).

Permanent Press or Durable Press

Permanent press is set into fabrics in one of two ways, each of which involves treating the fabric with a chemical. The treated fabric is then heat "cured," either before or after the garment is made. This processing gives the fabric its "no iron" properties. Actually, permanent press fabrics are "second generation" wash-and-wear, in that they deliver the "no iron" properties that wash-and-wear only promised.

Because the added chemicals tend to make natural fibers brittle and reduce

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1 Fibers, Fabrics and Finishes
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wearing properties, many permanent press garments are made from a blend of natural and man-made fibers, such as the polyesters, nylons and acrylics. Permanent press fabrics of cotton only or synthetics only are being developed.

Stretch garments also are available with permanent press features.

Both permanent press and wash-and-wear fabrics are thermoplastic, which means they become pliable when raised to temperatures used in home laundering. Unless they are handled properly during washing and drying, creases and wrinkles can be set in that are difficult to remove. However, these creases and wrinkles can be removed at the same temperatures by re-washing and redrying according to directions.

Coated

Oilcloth, probably the first coated fabric, was nothing more than fabric heavily coated with a drying oil similar to that used in paint. Newer coated fabrics use films of plastic heat sealed or chemically sealed to the base fabric. Coated fabrics appear in your home as upholstery, tablecloths and the more luxurious shower curtains. Many of these fabrics can be sponged rather than immersed to remove soil. Others are fully machine washable.

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water-how to make it work for you

Water is certainly the most necessary chemical in the home. It is a combination of two parts of hydrogen and one part of oxygen that will either dissolve or hold in suspension most of the common types of soil that plague the modern homemaker.

Unfortunately, water's virtues are also its faults. Our water supply comes from rain and snow. As water falls to the earth, it picks up gases and dust particles. As this water flows over the surface of the earth or seeps into the ground, it dissolves other materials, mainly minerals. Silt, clay, decayed vegetation and tiny organisms do not dissolve but are swept along with the water.

Each water supply contains different amounts and types of impurities, depending on what the water contacted before it arrived at the faucet in your home.

Common Impurities

Cloudy Water

Cloudy water is caused by materials suspended in the water, rather than dissolved. It is important that cloudy water be treated before it is used for

washing since some of the suspended materials will stain fabrics.

Stains and Odors

Dissolved iron and manganese compounds, common in waters drawn from ground supplies (wells), produce brownish or black stains on textiles and porcelain, and give a metallic taste to water.

Red stains from iron pipes or blue stains from copper piping, a "rotten egg" odor, or any other unpleasant odor or taste, all signal water impurity of some type.

The table at the end of this chapter will show you what steps are necessary to eliminate the problems caused by common water impurities.

Hard Water

The ring around the bathtub is typical of the problems caused by "hard water," which is nothing more than water containing calcium (lime) and magnesium compounds that combine with soap to form curd deposits on tub or fabrics. Rocky deposits in teapots, plugged water pipes and scale formation in water heaters and steam irons are all caused by hard water.

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2 Water-How to Make It Work For You
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Hardness is measured in grains per gallon. Water in the home usually falls between 3 to 30 grains per gallon. When hardness exceeds a 10-grain concentration, it is beneficial to install a water conditioning unit. Another way of expressing water hardness is in "parts per million" (ppm). One grain hardness equals 17 parts per million; 10 grain hardness equals 170 ppm.

Hard water causes grayed laundry. Hard water will not remove soil as well as soft water. Soils that are removed from the fabrics are not suspended properly because much of the detergent is used up counteracting the water hardness. To overcome this "graying," more detergent and possibly water conditioning is needed.

All detergents available today have a

water conditioner added. The amount used is about 50% of the weight of the detergent. This conditioner prevents the lime and magnesium salts from reacting with the detergent or from adhering (as a hard deposit) to fabric or machine parts. It is effective in waters with less than 10 grain hardness.

If your water comes from a municipal water supply, the water department can tell you how hard the water is. If your supply is private—your own well—you may wish to buy a simple testing kit from a chemical supply house or manufacturer of mechanical water conditioning equipment. The appliance department of your Sears store can arrange to have your well water tested for hardness. Sears also sells an automatic washer with an attached water refiner.

COMMON WATER PROBLEMS

Problem Cause Cure
Grayed laundry "Ring" in bathtub Hardness from calcium and magnesium Increased detergent, packaged water conditioner, or water conditioning equipment*
Brown to black stains on fabrics and porcelain Iron and manganese Water conditioner equipment with special filter* (see page 20).
Cloudy water Sand, silt or clay in suspension Filter*
"Rotten egg" odor Hydrogen sulfide Chlorination and filtration* For laundry, a very small amount of chlorine bleach
Yellow or brown stains on fabrics and porcelain Organic matter Consult water equipment dealer for remedy
Red stains from iron or galvanized pipes Corrosion of pipes Neutralizing filter* (see page 20).
Blue stains from copper " --
piping

\x91Consult water equipment dealer for proper units.
Page 11:

pensive stretch pants.

The key to satisfaction in purchasing garments or other washable household fabrics lies in selecting the right fabric and construction for the job to be done.

Intelligent buying is based on appearance, ease of care, durability, comfort and economy. However, no one fiber, fabric or garment can fulfill all of these requirements at the same time. The trick is in deciding which of these are necessary to give the performance you expect from the item being purchased.

For instance, blue jeans are relatively inexpensive for the wear they can withstand, but you don't expect them to have the sleek, slimming effect of ex-

A silk shantung suit is purchased for appearance, but certainly not for economy or durability. Fluffy dresses for little girls are usually expensive because they must be constructed to withstand frequent washings while still maintaining their appearance.

One of your best guides to shopping is name brands. Companies that want you to identify the product with them usually stand by the quality. Their reputations, and your future purchases, depend on it.

The Right Fabric

Check the labels and hang tags for washability, colorfastness, shrinkage control and wrinkle resistance. An important consideration is whether the fabric can be laundered with the regular wash or whether it will require special handling, particularly if it is to be washed frequently. A garment likely to

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3 Fabric Buying Guide
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become heavily soiled should be washable in hot water, preferably with other heavily soiled items.

Curtains, draperies and outdoor clothing should be labeled "sunfast" or "sun resistant." Underarm stains are more easily removed from washable garments labeled "perspiration resistant."

Treatments such as Scotchgard, that make fabrics stain resistant, are a great help on such items as children's clothing, men's washable trousers and slip covers.

Before you pay extra for children's clothes that provide a tuck to be let out as the child grows, consider how much the fabric will fade or change color. The "let-out" section may show up as darker or brighter, depending on the color fastness and shade of the garment when new.

Be sure decorative trim, lining and fabric require the same type of care. All should be washable at the same temperature and agitation speed.

With the new fabrics and finishes now on the market it is doubly important to follow directions on the label or hang tag. However, labels and tags tend to be conservative. If you have had experience with washing and drying similar fabrics by machine but the directions on a new purchase say "Wash by hand and drip dry," you would be justified in using your own judgment. Most fabrics can be machine washed and dried.

You may also have been puzzled by tags

with unclear or conflicting directions. The Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers (AHAM) is working toward better, more informative hang tags and labels. You can help in this effort by sending incorrect, incomplete and confusing tags and labels to the Association's technical director, Mr. Herbert Phillips, 20 North Wacker Drive, Chicago, Illinois 60606.

Permanent Press or Durable Press

There is some confusion between wash-and-wear and permanent press because of the great number of trade names identifying each and similarity in fiber content of the fabrics. Again, check the instructions. Permanent press garments will use the terms "no iron" and "for best results, tumble dry." Wash-and-Wear garments usually are labeled "Easy care, little or no ironing."

Remember that permanent press garments have all the pleats and creases "baked in," including the hemline. They can be shortened, but not lengthened. However, in the near future you can look forward to a solution of the alteration problems. If you purchase permanent press yard goods for home sewing, be sure the material comes with complete instructions for thread tension, length of stitch, etc. Performance results, however, generally will not be as good as in ready-made items.

Never buy a permanent press garment or material that has sharp wrinkles or creases where they are not supposed to be. These have been "baked"
Page 13:

in" the fabric accidentally by the manufacturer and can't be removed.

Construction

Deep seams are preferable on most garments since they give added strength and a little leeway for possible future alterations. Necessary seam depth de-

pends on fiber and weave. Slippery fibers, such as acetate rayon or nylon, and loosely woven fabrics, such as organdy and denim, need a deeper, more carefully finished seam. Fabrics that ravel easily should have bound, overcast or a similar type of seam finish. Most cottons hold their seam edges better if pinked.

OVERCASTING BINDING

PINKING

Avoid garments that have puckered seams, pockets, etc. Look for neat, even stitching.

Look for buttonholes that are well finished on the face and reverse side of the

fabric. Watch for metal or plastic buttons with sharp shanks or edges that cut thread and must be sewn back on repeatedly.

Zipper plackets that are too narrow or seams that ravel cause stuck zippers. Plackets should be wide enough to cover zipper teeth when ironing.

In other words, you should expect the same good workmanship in the articles you buy as in those you make yourself.

Rules of Thumb When Shopping

Look for performance qualities most important to you for the money you have to spend.

Use the product as it was intended to be used and follow the manufacturer's suggestions for care.

Save labels and hang tags! If the item doesn't live up to the label's promises, return it to the store. Manufacturers want to know when they have made a "boner." The American Apparel Manufacturers' Association has said, "...hopefully (the consumer will register her disappointment), in the form of a return . . . because if she doesn't return the item the manufacturer will never know that his product has created an unhappy customer who will avoid his label in the future."

Shop at stores willing to stand by their merchandise.

In the chapter, "The Family Wash," beginning on page 29, we'll discuss what washing procedures give best results with the various types of fabrics found in today's family wash basket.

11

3 Fabric Buying Guide
Page 14:

laundry supplies-where they are used and why

There is an endless array of laundry aids on the shelves of any supermarket. Television viewers are bombarded with claims of "whiter," "brighter," "softer," "fluffier," "safer," "cleaner."

of which are excellent washing materials for all the fabrics laundered by machine.

Normal Suds Type

The first synthetic detergents, developed in the 1930s, were light duty products, mild enough for delicate hand wash-ables and for the dishpan, but with limited cleaning abilities for the family wash. They produced billows of suds as soaps had done.

In fact, special "foam boosters" were added to make homemakers feel at home with the new products. These products are popular today, usually in liquid form, for mild washing tasks, particularly for dishes.

Are the claims merely a "sales pitch," or have you been overlooking new approaches to washing that can give you better laundry results?

Let's go back to the chemist again, from whose laboratory these products flow, to see how he rates the various types of products and how they are best used.

Synthetic Detergents

Distinct from soaps, which will be discussed later in this chapter, synthetic detergents are of two general types: normal sudsing and low sudsing, both

These mild detergents contain little or no "builder," ingredients that "build" or increase detergents' cleaning ability. Today's all-purpose detergents clean laundry better because builders are added. Although they are "heavy duty" in their ability to clean, they are still safe for anything washable in a machine.

The concern over the type of water pollution caused by foam from high sudsing detergents is at an end. All brand-name product manufacturers have converted to biodegradable detergents that are decomposed by bacteria in streams and sewage systems, at least as quickly as are other waste products. The earlier detergents were made from compounds that the bacteria couldn't get their teeth into.

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Too Little Won't Clean

If your laundry has a gray cast, you may be using too little detergent. Use of too little detergent is a very common error. The amount to use depends upon: the degree of soil, water hardness, wash water temperature and load size. See the chapter, "The Family Wash," starting on page 29. If your clothes have a soapy residue after rinsing, you may be using too much detergent. A suds lock, in which the water drains out but the suds do not, is also caused by too much detergent. Most washers today will allow the use of sufficient detergent for good washing.

NORMAL-SUDSING LAUNDRY DETERGENTS*

Powdered

American Family

Breeze

Cheer

Duz (detergent)

Fab

Felso

Kirkman Blue

News

Oxydol

Rinso Blue Silver Dust Super Suds Superb Surf Tide

White King D White Magic (detergent)

Liquid

Dynamo

Sun

Tex

Wisk

Soaps

Soap is an excellent washing agent if your water is soft—no more than 4 grains of hardness. In harder water, soap curd will cover the entire wash load, making clothes gray and stiff. If there are certain things you still prefer to wash with soap, although your water is hard, try adding a packaged water conditioner to both wash and rinse water, according to package directions.

LAUNDRY SOAPS*

American Family Flakes Ivory Snow

Chiffon Lux Flakes

Duz Rinso Soap

Instant Fels White King

Ivory Flakes Soap

•These are typical. You may find others in your locale.

*These are typical of the products distributed nationally. You may find others in your locale.

Water Conditioners (packaged)

Low Suds Type

Low or controlled suds detergents clean as well as normal sudsing detergents. They can be used in both top and front loading washers. For front loaders they can be used in greater quantities without over-sudsing your machine.

LOW-SUDSING DETERGENTS*

Liquid

Cold Power Cold Water All

Tablets

Quick-Solv

Salvo

Teem

Vim

Powdered

Active All AD Ajax Big T Bold Dash Felsmatic Fluffy All Kenmore Lo-Sudz

•These are typical. You may find others in your locale.

As was pointed out in the chapter on water, most synthetic detergents on the market today have a water conditioner added. If your laundry still comes out gray, you may need additional water conditioner or additional detergent.

There are two types of packaged water conditioners available: precipitating and non-precipitating. The first removes (precipitates) the hard water minerals. The second "ties" them up so that they remain inactive in the washing solution. Either type can be used with detergent or soap in the wash water. In the final rinse, the non-precipitating type is best because it is less irritating to skin when left in clothes.

Water conditioners help the cleaning agent do its job better. They should not be confused with fabric softeners, which

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4 Laundry Supplies—Where They Are Used and Why
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are designed to make fabrics feel smoother. Fabric softeners must never be used in the same water with the detergent or in the same water with a water conditioner.

WATER CONDITIONERS*

Precipitating Non-Precipitating

Climalene Calgon

Melo White King

Sal Soda (washing soda)

•These are typical. You may find others in your locale.

Bleaches

Used correctly, bleaches are a definite asset in your washing procedure; used incorrectly they can damage your clothing. Bleach is meant to assist detergents, not to replace them.

There are three types of laundry bleach on your grocers' shelves: liquid chlorine (strong), powdered chlorine (mild) and all-fabrics or oxygen (weak). The terms "strong," "mild" and "weak" are relative. All bleaches should be used with caution, according to the directions on the package.

Liquid Chlorine Bleach

Liquid chlorine bleach offers the best stain removal, but the greatest possibility of harming your clothes if used improperly. It should never be used on

silk, spandex, wool or fabrics that contain even the smallest percentages of these fibers.

Never pour straight chlorine bleach onto clothes; it will burn holes in the fabrics. This damage may not be apparent until later. Liquid chlorine must be diluted, according to label directions, before being added to the wash water. Even diluted, never pour it directly on to clothes. If your machine has a bleach dispenser, use it. It adds bleach at the right time and in the right way. Check the directions for the amount to use. Don't use more.

Dyes that are color-fast to washing, sometimes are not color-fast to chlorine bleaches. Check the label or hang tag for cautions about bleaching.

Certain synthetic fibers and some fabric finishes turn yellow or smell of bleach from either liquid or dry chlorine bleach. The label or hang tag will say "do not use chlorine bleach."

LIQUID CHLORINE BLEACHES*

Clorox Linco Sunny Sol

Fleecy White Purex Texize

Hilex Roman White Sail

Cleanser

*These are typical. You may find others in your locale.

Powdered Chlorine Bleach

Powdered chlorine bleach offers the same general type of bleaching as the liquid, but is more gentle in action since it releases bleaching ingredients more slowly as it dissolves. Never sprinkle powdered bleach directly on clothes. Add after washer has filled with water and started agitation. Although it is milder than liquid chlorine, it can damage clothing if used improperly.

POWDERED CHLORINE BLEACHES*

Action Hilex Reward

Barcolene Linco Stardust

Family Tree Purex Trey

Bleach Plus •These are typical. You may find others in your locale.

14
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Caution: Never use any type of chlorine bleach with acid-containing materials such as vinegar or toilet bowl cleaner. Bleaches such as HTH and Bleach Tab are for swimming pool use only; not for the laundry.

Oxygen or All-Fabrics Bleach

Oxygen bleaches are generally safe for all washable fabrics, producing little if any fabric damage even with over-use. They are kinder to most colors than chlorine bleaches and do not yellow chlorine-retentive finishes and fibers. Used regularly, they help to maintain the brightness of white and colored items.

Perborate-based oxygen bleaches do not become effective until quite high temperatures are reached, which means they must be used in very hot water to perform. Many fabrics and colors will not take the hot water required.

Chemists are at work now trying to devise means that will trigger release of the bleaching ingredients at lower temperatures.

One of the newer formulations, an oxygen bleach with potassium monopersulfate as its active bleaching agent, is efficient at lower water temperatures and more effective generally than the perborates. All-Fabric Beads-O'-Bleach is an example of this type of product.

Most dyes that are color-fast to washing are not affected by oxygen bleaches.

OXYGEN BLEACHES*

Potassium

Perborate

A-Penn Oxone

Care Dexol Du-Rite Lestare

Sage Safety Snowy Thanx Vano

Monopersulfate

All Fabric Beads-O'-Bleach

\x91These are typical. You may find others in your locale.

Some detergents include an oxygen-based bleaching agent but the amount is usually too small to be very effective.

Fabric Softeners

Fabric softeners are designed to make any fabric feel softer and smoother. They also give bulk to such articles as Turkish towels, reduce the static electricity in synthetic fibers and "lubricate" fibers to make ironing easier.

Be sure to follow directions on the label carefully. Over-use can make fabrics water repellent, resulting in loss of absorbency.

Fabric softeners must never be used in the same water with detergents or packaged water conditioners because they are mutually antagonistic.

If combined they react to form a gooey, sticky mess! Fabric softeners belong only in the final rinse water. If you are going to starch clothes, do not use fabric softener.

FABRIC SOFTENERS*

Bonny Fluff

Felsoft

Softeze

Diasof

Final Touch

Soft Rinse

Downy

King Fluff

Sta-Puf

Dri Soft

Laundry Fluff

Zippy Fluff

E Z Time

Nu-Soft

•These are typical. You may find others in your locale.

Bluing and Whiteners

Before the turn of the century, the homemaker depended on boiling water and yellow cake soap to get her cottons and linens clean and bluing to keep them white. She knew that as cotton and linen aged they took on a yellowish

15

4 Laundry Supplies-Where They Are Used and Why
Page 18:

tint. In addition, her crude laundry methods could not remove oils and other impurities that added to the yellowing. Bluing, which is actually a blue dye, masked this yellowing when added to the rinse water and made clothes appear white.

Bluing

With improved laundering methods, bluing became less necessary. Today the new optical whiteners (brighteners), incorporated in detergents, have reduced bluing to a very minor role. There are only three brands of true bluing on the market: Little Boy Blue, Mrs. Stewarts and Bulldog, all of which must be added to the final rinse, but not to the wash water.

Optical Whiteners (brighteners)

The new optical whiteners used in all modern detergents are colorless dyes that fluoresce, or glow, when exposed to sunlight, much as a fluorescent light tube glows. The result is an optical illusion that the clothes are whiter.














Starch

Starch is one of the oldest-known laundry aids, used for centuries to give added body to cottons, keep them clean longer by preventing soil from entering the fibers, and aid in soil removal (the soil comes out with the starch).

Almost all modern vegetable starches are precooked. They need only be diluted with hot or cold water, depending on the type, to be ready for use. Vegetable starches in spray cans also are available.

Numerous synthetic starches are available, some in spray cans, that are superior in many ways to the natural product. Generally the synthetic starches are more resistant to mussing and wear and more effective on synthetic-fiber fabrics. Some last through numerous washings (durable plastic type).

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Starch manufacturers have used the latest technology and science to make their products effective and convenient, when used according to package directions, so please check before you pour or spray.

I Special Laundry Products

Diaper Conditioners

Some diaper conditioners are designed to kill the bacteria that cause diaper rash in babies; others sweeten diapers before washing. Use according to package directions, since some are designed for the final rinse only and others for the wash water. Read the labels.

Borax products have been used for years as "sweeteners" for diapers and other clothing. They neutralize acids on intimate wearing apparel and assist your detergent in purging dirt from clothes. To some extent they also tie up lime in hard water. Borax and Borateem are examples.

Diaper Conditioners

Ammorid

Diaperwitz

Diaper Pure

Diaper-Sweet

Diapersol

Diaperene Chloride

Disinfectants

During and after a contagious illness in the family it is advisable to disinfect clothing, towels and bed linen. Wherever you are sharing a washer, as in a self-service laundry or apartment building, use a disinfectant regularly. According to Ethel McNeil, microbiologist of the U. S. Department of Agriculture, "Research has shown that a suitable disinfectant used during laundering can prevent or reduce the spread of bacterial infections by clothing and household textiles." The following disinfectants were found effective when used according to package directions.

DISINFECTANTS

Pine Oil Types Phenolic Types Quaternary Types* Liquid Chlorine
Fyne Pyne All Pine CO-OP Sanitizer Any liquid
Fyne Tex Pine-Sol Roccal chlorine bleach
King Pine
Pine-O-Pine
White Cap

"Quaternary disinfectants must be used only in the final rinse.

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4 Laundry Supplies—Where They Are Used and Why
Page 20:

Ammonia

Ammonia products also act as detergent boosters, increasing the alkalinity of the wash water. Mrs. Perkins Ammonia and Little Bo-Peep are typical examples. If you use ammonia in the same water with chlorine bleach, you may expect reduced bleaching action.

All Purpose Cleaners

The list of all purpose cleaners and the claims made for them are almost end-

less. Most of them are good for pretreating greasy stains but they must not be used as a laundry detergent substitute. Read the label carefully. Some are actually inflammable and must be rinsed out of clothing thoroughly before putting the item in the washing machine.

In the next chapter, "Graying, Yellowing, Heavy Soils, Stains," we'll show you how to use laundry supplies to solve common (and some not so common) washday problems.

All Purpose Cleaners

Powdered Liquid
Climalene Ajax All-Purpose Cleaner Lestoil
Oakite Fels Naptha Cleaner Pine-Sol
Perfex Bruce Mr. Clean
Soilax Golden Handy Andy Texize
Spic & Span Handy Andy with Ammonia White Magic
Tidy House Cleaner
Tyro

Reminders

In Wash Water Only In Final Rinse Only Never Mix in the Same Water
Detergent Fabric softener Fabric softener and detergent
Soap Bluing Fabric softener and bleach
Liquid bleach, diluted Quaternary disinfectants Fabric softener and water conditioner
Powdered bleach Fabric softener and starch
Pine oil and phenolic Bleach and bluing
disinfectants Bleach and vinegar
Borax products Ammonia Precipitating water conditioner Soap and synthetic detergent

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graying, yellowing, heavy soils, stains

Causes, Prevention and Cures

Discoloration of laundered items can be caused by left-in dirt and body oils (graying and yellowing); use of chlorine bleach on certain fabrics and finishes (yellowing); the nature of the fiber (yellowing); chemicals in the wash water (yellowing). Except for stains and smudges that may require special spotting, and certain fibers that yellow with age, most discolorations can be removed right in the washing machine. Further on in the chapter is a stain treatment chart for special problems. Nylon and some other synthetics tend to "pick-up" certain dyes. It is safest to wash white synthetics and nylons only with other white items.

Grayed Laundry

Overall dinginess is one of the most common complaints of the homemaker, yet one of the easiest to solve. It may be caused by dirt and soil that remain in clothes after laundering because too little detergent is used for the size of load, the amount of soil in the laundry and hardness of the water.

From Too Little Detergent For Soil or Load Size

The quickest cure is an overnight soak in a concentrated detergent bath, following this method (do not use on silk

or wool):

1. Fill washer to lowest level with the hot (140\xB0F.) water (turn up the water heater if necessary). Add one cup Calgon water conditioner. Then add four times the amount of detergent you normally use for a full load. For example, if you have been using one cup, use four cups for the soak bath.

2. Put clothes in and agitate until clothes are saturated (about one minute), but not long enough to produce high suds. Stop machine and let clothes soak for about. 12 hours or overnight.

3. After soaking, set machine to drain and spin (do not agitate). After the spin, reset machine for regular wash cycle, using hot water. Add more Calgon (one cup) and diluted bleach (follow instructions on box or bottle for amount) if you desire. Do not add more detergent. Use as many extra rinses as necessary to remove all detergent.

From Too Little Detergent For Water Hardness

The cure is to use Calgon packaged water conditioner in place of detergent, as follows:

Set your machine for regular hot wash and add at least one cup of Calgon. Let washer go through its complete cycle. Repeat the entire process four or five times, or until no more suds appear during the washing period. Suds appear because Calgon releases tied-up detergent and soil.

Caution: Use warm water for washable silks and woolens.

To prevent future graying follow good laundering practices as discussed in the chapter, "The Family Wash," beginning on page 29. This includes using hot water (if items allow) and increasing the amount of detergent for each load. If added detergent creates a suds problem, switch to a low sudsing product.

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5 Graying, Yellowing, Heavy Soils, Stains
Page 22:

Clothing and linens yellow for a number of reasons: accumulation of oily soils, particularly body oils; chlorine bleach used on chlorine retentive fabrics; iron or rusty water and red clay soils; fibers that yellow with age.

General Yellowing

Cottons and the polyester fabrics (Dacron, Fortrel, Kodel and Vycron) tend to become yellow as they are used because they retain oily soils when they are washed with water not hot enough and with too little detergent.

The concentrated detergent overnight soak method described for removing graying will also help remove general yellowing.

Good laundering practices and hot water with increased detergent will prevent the yellow from reoccurring.

Yellowing of Wash-and-Wear

Many of the types of fibers that give wash-and-wear clothes their easy care features are chlorine retentive. That is, they retain the chlorine and take on a yellow cast or smell of chlorine. Use one of the following methods to regain the original appearance:

For colored or white items (do not use on silk or wool):

Rinse fabric thoroughly with water. Then soak for 30 minutes or longer in a solution of one teaspoon sodium thiosul-fate (sold in crystalline form at drugstores and as "hypo" at photographers' supply stores) to each quart of water in a glass or plastic container. Never use this solution in your washer or sink.

Use water as hot as fabric allows. Then

rinse fabric thoroughly in clean water. Wash as normal with detergent and an all-fabrics (oxygen) bleach.

For white only:

Use package color remover such as Rit or Tintex, following package instructions. However, you may use warm water and need not simmer the items.

Never use color remover in your washer or sink. A plastic, glass or enamel container is best.

This type of yellowing is the easiest to prevent. Read labels and tags with each item you purchase. Chlorine retentive fabrics are labeled "Do not use chlorine bleach." If in doubt as to fiber content, use an oxygen bleach. See the chapter, "Laundry Supplies," beginning on page 12.

Iron, Rust and Red Clay Soils

If you have spots of yellow from these materials, use one of the commercial rust removal products listed on page 21. General yellowing from any of these causes is removed in the following way:

Put clothes in your washer with water as hot as is safe for fabric. Select normal wash cycle and the longest wash time. Add y2 cup tartaric acid or one cup citric acid (both are available at drugstores) to the wash water. Do not add detergent! It reduces the effectiveness of the tartaric or citric acid. Let washer complete its cycle. Repeat the entire process if necessary.

The only way to prevent this type of yellowing from recurring is to install a water conditioning unit or a special filter to treat the water before it is used in the laundry. Consult your Sears retail or catalog sales store or any other store that sells water conditioning equipment.

If you live in an area where red clay soil gets on clothes before they are washed your only solution is periodic treatment as just described with tartaric or citric acid.

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Page 23:

Yellowing of Nylon, Spandex, Acrylics

Nylon, spandex and the acrylics (Orion, Acrilan, Creslan and Sayelle) yellow with age, whether they are used and washed or not. This type of yellowing cannot be prevented. However, good laundering practices and the use of a chlorine bleach 011 nylon and acrylics will prolong their original appearance. Spandex can be bleached only with an all-fabrics (oxygen) bleach.

Heavy Soil and Ground-In Dirt

Children's play clothes, men's work clothes and collars and cuffs require pre-treatment of heavily soiled areas before washing. Rub a heavy-duty liquid detergent or a paste of powdered detergent and water into the soiled areas. Then wash in regular manner using good laundering practices as described in the chapter beginning on page 29.

For items that have been washed but still retain some of the soil, use the heavy detergent-overnight soak method described for "Graying."

Stain Treatment

The key to successful spot removal is treating the stain as soon as possible. The longer the stain remains on the fabric, the more chance it has to penetrate the fibers. Even if you can't treat it immediately, be sure to do so before washing or ironing. Heat, hot water and detergent can drive the soil into the fibers, causing a permanent stain.

Supplies You'll Need

You need only a few common household products, available at your grocery or drug store, to remove stains on most

clothing and linens, plus a stiff fingernail brush or old toothbrush.

The following list includes a few well known brand names; there are many others available that are just as effective:

Bleaches and Stain Removing Aids

Chlorine bleaches All-fabrics oxygen bleaches Household ammonia Meat tenderizer (unseasoned)

Pepsin

Hypo (Sodium Thiosulphate)

Rust Stain Removers

Whink

SSS-T Rust Remover

Gartside's Iron Rust Stain Remover

Heavy-Duty Liquid Detergents

Liquid All Whisk

Dry Cleaning Fluids

Carbona K2R Spot Lifter Rubbing alcohol Perchlorethylene Trichlorethylene

Caution: Carbon tetrachloride and commercial solvents containing it are not recommended because of its highly toxic effects.

Procedure

Before treating the stain, test the stain removing product on an inside seam to be sure the fabric and color will not be damaged by the remover. This is particularly important before treating with chlorine bleach or nail polish remover. Chlorine bleach must be diluted according to package or bottle directions before being applied to the fabric.

When treating the stain use a small stiff brush (nail or toothbrush) with a light tapping action. Hard rubbing may redistribute the soil to a larger area or damage the fibers. After treating the stain, machine or hand wash the item, according to normal procedure.

21

5 Graying, Yellowing, Heavy Soils, Stains
Page 24:

before you wash, prepare your loads

A little extra care before clothes are popped into your washer can save much extra work later. Mend rips and tears so they don't "grow," sew on loose buttons; remove unwashable trimmings, shoulder pads and belts; close zippers, hooks and fasteners; tie sashes to prevent tangling, and remove anything sharp.

Turn pockets inside out and turn down cuffs, brushing out lint, sand, etc.

Treat stains according to directions in chapter beginning on page 19, so that they won't be set by washing temperatures.

How To Sort

Basically, clothes and other washables are sorted by color:

COLORFAST

by fabric and finish:

SYNTHETICS WASH-AND-WEAR PERMANENT PRESS

by how the item is constructed and by the amount of soil. What you are really doing in sorting is choosing items that can be washed at the same temperatures, wash and spin speeds, and with the same laundry aids.

Rules of Thumb

Hot water cleans best. Use it for all

white and colorfast fabrics except those of delicate fibers (silk, wool, rayon, acetate, Dynel and Verel).

Colored items that tend to fade stay brighter when washed in medium or warm water.

Most synthetics, wash-and-wear and permanent press fabrics can be washed in hot water (check the label), but should be cooled with cold water before the first spin to minimize wrinkling.

Wash white nylon with white items only. Nylon picks up color easily from other clothes.

Separate silk, wool, spandex and chlorine-sensitive fabrics from loads that are to be bleached with a chlorine product.

When in doubt as to what bleach can be used, play it safe by using an all-fabrics bleach.

Corduroy, some synthetic fibers and certain finishes pick up lint. Napped and quilted items, such as chenille robes and spreads; fleecy coats; mattress pads, and baby blankets produce lint

25

6 Before Your Wash, Prepare Your Loads
Page 25:

and should be washed together for best results. Separate lint takers from lint makers.

Dark colors that tend to fade may "bleed" onto lighter colored fabrics. It's safer not to mix them.

Sheer, lace-trimmed and delicately made blouses, dresses and lingerie should be washed in delicate loads. Use Delicate or Gentle cycle on your machine if it has one.

Heavily soiled clothes frequently require a pre-wash or soaking. Refer to page 32 for directions.

Grease "travels." Keep grease and oil stained items out of other loads.

Blankets, bedspreads and shag rugs are best washed alone because of their size and linting properties.

Size of Load

Smaller loads mean cleaner laundry. The most common reason for dingy clothes is a combination of too little detergent, too many clothes per load and water that is not hot enough.

The space that fabrics occupy (bulk) is more important than their weight. Ten

pounds of the new fabrics may take up twice the space of 10 pounds of cottons.

Give your clothes elbow room and they'll behave better. Wash-and-wear can become wash and iron when crowded during washing; permanent press looks mussed. Even cottons and linens need less ironing if they have had room to move freely.

Finally, your detergent and other laundry aids reach each part of the fabric more efficiently when clothes aren't crowded.

Vary the size of items in the load—a few large things mixed with smaller items will give the best washing results. A top loading automatic or wringer washer will handle two double or three twin sheets plus other smaller pieces. A front loader's limit is usually one double or two twin sheets with other smaller items. For any washer the limiting factor is bulk rather than weight.

Sample Loads

Just how many items of each kinds you include in a load is partly a matter of experience. The following table is given as a general guideline.

SUGGESTED LOADS





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SECTION II Ways To Wash

from scrub board to push button

Our 1900 homemaker with her bar of yellow soap and bottle of bluing, boiling water and scrub board washed everything by hand. Today, hand washing usually is reserved for a few delicate items such as nylon hosiery, woolen sweaters and the few things that fade excessively. If you have an automatic washer with a third or gentle wash speed, sometimes called "Extra Care," you probably use it for even the daintiest lingerie.

Conventional Washers

\_____________________________r

The first giant step in laundering came with the invention of the electric wringer washer in the 1900s. Each step—filling with water, adjusting temperature and washing time, wringing, rinsing and draining—was done by the homemaker, but she no longer had to scrub or wring by hand.

Two types of conventional washers are

still sold. One has motor driven rollers to wring out wash and rinse water; the other has a separate spinning basket to extract water. Both types are automatic in comparison to the first electric models.

Top-of-the-line models have a choice of agitation speeds, timers that signal the end of a pre-set washing period; and automatic pumps for draining.

These machines do a good job of getting clothes clean but they pose a problem in the care of wash-and-wear and permanent press garments. It is possible to get acceptable results by taking clothes from the wash water and dipping them in cool rinse water before putting through the wringer. Dry in an automatic dryer if possible. If you do not have a dryer, the items may need touch-up ironing.

Automatic Washers

The grandfather of the modern automatic washer was born in the late 1930s, a front loader that had to be bolted to the floor to prevent it from "walking" as it washed. The price was high and the laundry came out somewhat less than sparkling clean. But it was a beginning. By the 1950s both top and front loading automatic machines were available and they accounted for more sales than the wringer washer.

Even the lowest priced modern automatics wash, rinse, spin and drain without any help from the homemaker.

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7 From Scrub Board to Push Button
Page 27:

The top loader (agitator washer) cleans by means of a center agitator that keeps clothing and water in motion, gently forcing water through the fabrics.

The front loader (tumbler washer) has no agitator but rather tumbles clothes and water together as the drum revolves.

Top and front loading automatic washers range from machines with one speed agitation and spin, and a choice of hot, warm or cold water, to models

with pre-set cycles for different kinds of fabrics.

Completely automatic top-of-the-line machines have such innovations as three agitation speeds, two spin speeds, five combinations of wash-rinse temperatures and many washing cycles. These pre-set cycles on a Lady Kenmore automatic, for instance, provide exactly the right temperatures and speeds for heavily soiled clothes, for normal loads, for permanent press and wash-and-wear, for delicates and for washable woolens.

Various manufacturers offer a variety of special features, such as self-cleaning lint filters; dispensers for detergent, bleach and fabric softener; pre-washes; extra rinses; and suds return.

In Section 5, "Appliance Buying Guide," we will discuss how to choose the automatic that will do the best job for you with the money you have to spend.

Combination Washer and Dryer

Combination washer-dryers (all front loading) carry on all the functions of the automatic washer and then dry the clothes in the same machine. When the load is dry, the machine shuts itself off. For special loads, the combination machine can be used as just a washer or just a dryer.

It has two big advantages over separate machines, in that clothes need not be transferred from one to the other and the unit takes only half the space of two machines.

In the next chapter we'll show you how to take the guesswork out of washing with the automatic.

28
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the family wash

Whether you wash with a wringer washer; an automatic with pre-set cycles for different types of loads, or an automatic for which you choose water levels, temperatures, speed and time, the ground rules are the same. At the end of this chapter we'll explain how to apply these rules to hand laundry, also.

Wash Water Temperature

Wash water temperature and the amount of detergent are the two most critical factors in a good wash.

Hot water is still the best for removing the dirt, when the fabric and color can take it. Hot means at least 140\xB0F. in the washer. At these temperatures, detergents and bleaches work better and greasy or oily stains dissolve more easily. If your water heater is some distance from the washer, you may have to raise the heater setting, since water cools as it travels through pipes.

Cottons and linens, whites and color-fast, are washed in hot water. Even permanent press, wash-and-wear and most synthetic fiber fabrics can be washed in hot water if your washer has a permanent press cycle that cools the wash water before the first spin. This system minimizes wrinkling.

Warm water (100\xB0 to 120\xB0F.) does not remove soil as well as hot water but it must be used for colors that fade or fabrics, such as wool and acetate, that are likely to shrink. To remove heavy soiling from items that fade or shrink, use a warm water soak or pre-wash. Water should not exceed 100\xB0 for washable woolens.

Wool, whether shrink-treated or not, will shrink some the first time washed. This "relaxation shrinkage" is natural to wool fibers and the way they are treated in the mill.

Cold water is least satisfactory, particularly for removing heavy and greasy soils. Almost any fabric that is washable will tolerate at least warm water. Wool fabrics that shrink are more affected by excess handling than by temperature of water. The washable woolens cycle on a Kenmore uses a 4-minute intermittent agitate and soak in warm water, a warm rinse and slow speed spin extraction.

Amount of Detergent

Use enough detergent to take out the dirt. Remember, the dirtier the clothes,

the bigger the load,

29

8 The Family Wash
Page 29:

the harder the water, If your laundry looks dingy, you are

probably not using enough detergent. Try the amount listed for hard water. If you are getting too much sudsing when you add enough detergent to clean properly, try switching to a low suds product (see the chapter on "Laundry Supplies" beginning on page 12).

#o

the more detergent you need. If you use enough detergent, you won't have to bleach as often and your clothes will wear longer.

Directions on detergent packages are based on the minimum amount for a normal size load, average soiling and average water hardness. You must adjust the amounts according to your own size and type load and water conditions. A normal sudsing detergent should maintain thick suds during washing. A low sudser cannot always be judged by the layer of suds on the washer.

For smaller than normal loads, decrease the amount of detergent somewhat.

AMOUNT OF DETERGENT FOR AVERAGE SIZE LOAD









Always use a low suds detergent in a front loading automatic or a combination washer-dryer.
Page 30:

Agitation and Spin Speeds

Many automatic washers (usually top loaders) now offer a choice of agitation and spin speeds, allowing you to wash more special care fabrics by machine. More deluxe models offer programmed cycles that choose the correct speeds and temperatures for anything you wash. The faster the agitation and spin speeds, the more agitated and spun the clothes are. Anything that requires gentle or a minimum amount of handling holds up better if it is agitated and spun at lower speeds.

Agitation Speeds

Normal agitation speed can be used for all sturdy fabrics and most well made items.

Medium agitation is for loosely woven fabrics, all silks and acetates and well-made garments with more delicate construction.

Slow agitation is for anything that, because of fiber, fabric or construction, requires the gentlest of care. Typical examples are a wool blanket, lace tablecloth, or fragile lingerie and other items.

Spin Speeds

Normal spin speeds handle most wash loads.

Slow spin is designed for permanent press, wash-and-wear and other synthetics that may have wrinkles "set" in by excess spinning, and for very delicate fabrics and construction.

If your automatic has cycles marked for various kinds of fabrics and loads, use them. These cycles provide the proper water temperature, agitation and spin speeds for the loads indicated. Manu-

facturers of appliances spend huge sums of money determining the exact care necessary for all the items you wash. The cycles are "programmed" to take advantage of the latest research.



Rinsing



Most automatic washers give a choice of warm or cold rinse temperature.

Warm is used for the bulk of the wash.

Cold is used for permanent press, wash-and-wear and synthetics to minimize wrinkling.

Extra rinsing may be desirable for diapers, when tinting in the washer and after an extra sudsy wash. Check your owner's manual for directions on resetting the controls for an extra rinse. Some washers provide an optional automatic second rinse.

Water Level

Many automatic washers allow you to vary the water level to fit the size of the load. In using this feature, be sure you always have enough water to let the clothes roll or tumble freely in the washer. Overloading can be as much a problem at low water levels as at high level.

For permanent press and wash-and-wear it is best to use a full tub of water. This avoids crowding and minimizes wrinkling.

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8 The Family Wash
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RECOMMENDED WATER TEMPERATURE, AGITATION AND SPIN SPEEDS









Soaking or Pre-Wash

As with water temperature, agitation and spin speeds and amount of detergent, wash time varies with the amount of soil and type of load. In general, lightly soiled items can be washed for shorter times than those heavily soiled. Delicate fibers, fabrics and construction call for short wash time. Consult operating instructions for your washer, since each manufacturer recommends times best suited to his machine.

Anything (except wool) that is heavily soiled or has difficult-to-remove soil benefits from either soaking or a prewash. Soaking or a pre-wash also aid in stain removal. It is also a safe way to treat fabrics that cannot tolerate hot water or chlorine bleaches. Pre-washing or soaking should always be done with warm or cold water, depending on the type of fabric. Use detergent in both the pre-wash or soak water and the regular wash water for the best results.

Most washers provide either an automatic pre-wash cycle or give instructions for a pre-wash or soak. Check your owner's manual.

32
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}

1

Laundry Aids and Dispensers

For information on the various laundry aids and their usage, see the chapter beginning on page 12. Pay special attention to the instructions for liquid chlorine bleach. It must be diluted with water before being added to the wash water.

Washing By Hand

Hand washing is never as satisfactory as washing by machine for getting items clean. But there are a number of things you can do to get good results.

Use water as hot as fabric and color will allow. Soak in this water, with extra detergent, for 20-30 minutes. Use water conditioner if you use soap or if your water is hard. Repeat if necessary. At the end of the soaking period you can add enough cool water to handle items comfortably.

Rinse until the rinse water is clear, using warm or cool water. Add fabric softener to the final rinse, if desired.

The many special items you wash in your machine are covered in the next chapter, along with hints for starching and tinting by machine.

Dispensers

Many washers now have dispensers that add detergent, bleach and fabric softener at just the right time during the wash and rinse. For instance, a washer with a liquid bleach dispenser introduces bleach at the proper time in the wash cycle, usually during the last 4 minutes of washing. The fabric softener is fed in during the last rinse. Follow the manufacturer's recommendation for your machine.
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special 1


I Cl

With the new automatic washers and laundry aids available, many of the things that were considered "special items" just a few years ago are now washed routinely with the regular family laundry. But there are still a few things that need special care.

Blankets

As with everything you wash, check the label first. If it says "For best results, dry clean," by all means do. For blankets that are washable, use the following methods:

Orion, Acrilan and other synthetics: Use a wash-and-wear cycle to reduce wrinkling, if your washer has one. If not, use warm water for washing, a cold rinse and, if available, slow spin speeds.

Wool, Rayon and Electric: Use the

washable woolens cycle if your washer has one, with the high water level. Add detergent to the wash water and a fabric softener to the rinse water. In front loading machines, use the same cycle, a low sudsing detergent and a fabric softener in the rinse.

For top loading automatic washers without specific cycles, use the following method:

—Fill washer to high level with warm water.

—Add detergent and agitate for short time to dissolve detergent. Add blanket.

—Soak blanket in washer for 15-20 minutes.

—Agitate 1-2 minutes at slowest speed available.

—Drain and spin out water.

—Refill washer with warm water, mixing fabric softener, and rinse at slowest speed for 1 minute.

—Drain and spin out water.

—Rinse a second time if desired, but add fabric softener only to second rinse.

For tumble washers (front loading) without specific cycles, use the same method, but with a low sudsing detergent.

For a wringer washer, use the method given for an automatic washer without specific cycles. Caution do not put electric blanket through wringer. Wring water out by hand.

Woolens

Unless the label or tag specifically says "washable," don't wash knitted woolen fabrics or blends of wool and other fibers.

For those that are labeled machine washable follow laundering instructions that come with the item or use one of the methods for wool blankets.

Refer to page 43 for instructions on drying woolens and blankets.

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Curtains, Draperies, Slipcovers

In general, curtains, draperies and slip covers are washed according to the type of fabric and color, just as you wash other items. However, curtains and draperies are likely to be weakened by exposure to sunlight, which means they may have to be treated as "delicates," with slow agitation and spin speeds.

For best results, wash only those that are tagged "colorfast" and "shrink resistant."

If these items are heavily soiled or badly discolored, use the concentrated overnight soak method (see the chapter beginning on page 19).

Remove pins, hooks and non-washable trims and then shake off loose dirt before washing.

Glass fiber curtains and draperies must be washed by hand unless stated otherwise on washing instructions packaged with the item.

Diapers

To prevent permanent staining, rinse diapers immediately after use and store them in a pail of water to which you have added a diaper conditioner, Borax or Borateem.

Wash no more than 30-36 diapers at one time for best results. They can be washed as regular white cottons in hot water. But, before washing, spin or wring out the water in which they have been soaking.

You may wish to pre-wash diapers or give them an additional rinse, or both.

Check your washer's operating instructions on how to do this.

Pillows

If you have an automatic washer or a conventional type with spin basket, you can wash all but kapok pillows. The kapok mats when wet and cannot be re-fluffed. Both types of washers spin out the water so that the pillows can be dried on the line or in the dryer. Don't try to put a pillow through a wringer; it's too large and bulky.

Wash foam rubber pillows in their own covering. Sew or pin other pillows into a pillow slip to avoid a mess in case the ticking breaks. It's a good idea to check the ticking before you wash and mend any weak seam.

Use a short or delicate washing cycle with a warm water wash. Fill machine with warm water and detergent and agitate until detergent is dissolved. In an agitator washer (top loading), pillows tend to float. Stop the washer part way through the wash and push pillows under until completely submerged.

Always wash two pillows at a time to balance the machine.

Refer to page 42 for drying instructions. Foam rubber pillows cannot be dried with heat. They must be hung on the line or dried on an Air setting, if your dryer has one. Feather pillows should not be washed unless a dryer is available. Otherwise, they will mildew.

cf Ifc?

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9 Washing Special Items Starching and Tinting
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Starching In the Machine

Starching by machine takes all the fuss and mess out of starching and gives you clothes with an even crispness. Liquid, instant or cooked starch can be used. The product package will give you instructions on how to dilute and amount to use.

Fill your automatic washer to the lowest water level with warm or cold water. In a wringer washer, judge water level by size of load. Add the starch, according to package directions, and allow machine to run for a minute or so to mix thoroughly. Add clothes and let tumble or agitate for a few minutes.

Drain washer and spin or wring water from clothes. Do not rinse clothes. If your washer has a spin-spray rinse, bypass it or turn off water faucets.

After removing clothes, put the washer through a deep rinse cycle to clean out all traces of starch.

Tinting In the Machine

One of the delights of owning an auto-

matic washer is the ease with which you can tint large items, such as sheets, curtains and bedspreads.

Each package of dye for home tinting gives specific instructions for tinting by machine. Follow these for best results. If you are using a wringer washer, be sure clothes are thoroughly rinsed before putting through the wringers to avoid staining wringers.

Wipe the inside of the washer with a clean white cloth after removing the clothes. If there is any trace of dye on the wiping cloth, run the washer through a wash-and-rinse cycle with liquid or powdered chlorine bleach added to the wash water only.

Be sure you don't spill the dye on the outside of the washer because it may discolor it. The dye may also stain the inside of the washer, but this will not affect later washes.

Never use Color Remover in any washer.

It is best not to use a combination washer-dryer for tinting because tinted lint remaining in the machine may stain the next wash. However, it can be done if special precautions are observed. Check your owner's manual for instructions.

The next two chapters will suggest ways of drying your clothes to save ironing time.

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Section III Ways To Dry and Iron

from clothesline to push button

The first clothesline probably was a vine strung from tree to tree. Consider how little clothes drying changed from prehistoric times to World War II. Man had taken to the air in planes, to the road in automobiles and to the sea in diesel-powered ships. But clothes still flapped in the breeze across the back yards of the world.

Engineering know-how finally was turned toward the home and ways to make living more leisurely, housework less of a drudgery. First, the automatic washer and then, the automatic dryer became realities.

Line drying and flat drying still serve .a useful purpose, but more for special items than for the entire family wash.

Line drying, for instance, is recommended for the final drying of blankets that must be taken from the automatic dryer while still slightly damp to prevent shrinkage. Knit woolens and cottons, such as sweaters and baby clothes,

should be stretched gently to original shape while slightly damp and then dried on a flat surface.

Automatic Dryers

What sun and breeze can do in four hours (or more), the automatic tumble dryer does in 30 minutes to an hour. For the dryer "irons", too, particularly the new permanent press, wash-and-wear, and synthetic fabrics and blends.

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10 From Clothesline to Push Button
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Today's dryers are a far cry from the first machines that had to be checked periodically to prevent overdrying or even scorching. Even the least expensive dryers now have some means of setting the drying time and amount of heat. Most of these machines also have an Air setting for fluffing pillows, removing dust from curtains and draperies and for drying items that cannot be dried with heat.

Middle-of-the-line dryer models offer additional flexibility, with programmed cycles for various kinds of loads that require different drying temperatures and times. Other models are more versatile, providing automatic temperature control for all loads plus a variety of user —selected dryness levels. Some of these machines have a choice of two drying speeds, air fresheners and dampening devices to prepare items for ironing.

Top-of-the-line dryers approach complete automation, with a sensing system in some that shuts off the dryer when the clothes are dry. Some models can be set to shut off when a chosen amount of moisture is reached in the items being dried.

In Section 5, "Laundry Appliance Buying Guide," we will explain how to match your needs with your pocketbook when shopping for an automatic dryer.

Advantages of Automatic Dryers

Many of the advantages of an automatic dryer are obvious: it keeps children, pets, birds and dirt off clothes being dried; it is ready to be used in all kinds of weather; and it saves time.

But other advantages just cannot be appreciated until you have had the experience of using a dryer.

Towels are fluffy and soft.

Children's play clothes, many work clothes and sportswear come out ready to be smoothed, folded and put away. Permanent press, wash-and-wear, and synthetic fabrics really live up to their claims when tumble dried.

Most delicate things you formerly washed by hand and then "drip" dried can go into the dryer. No mess, no puddles.

The advantages all add up to one thing: a saving in time. For with the automatic dryer, your clothes not only are softer and fluffier, but many need only touch-up ironing.

In the next chapter, you'll find hints on drying everything you wash (whether you dry on a clothesline or in a dryer).
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ways to dry

On the Line



Most items you wash dry smoother and fluffier in the automatic dryer because the dryer actually flexes the fibers while it is drying. Clothes not only dry faster, but with less wear. But, there are a few basic rules that can help you get the best results possible with line drying.

Since clothes dried on the line tend to be stiff and rough feeling, it is a good idea to use a fabric softener in the final rinse in your washer. However, don't use fabric softener on items that are to be starched. Starch and fabric softener on the same item combine to stick to your iron. If this occurs, the only solution is to re-wash the item.

Sun fades some colors. Turn colored clothes inside out.

To protect delicate fabrics, place a handkerchief between the item and the clothespin. Spring-type pins are less likely to snag or stain because they do not have to be pushed down to secure clothes on the line.

Shake clothes sharply to remove as many wrinkles as possible before hanging. Large items, such as blankets, bedspreads and draperies, will dry with a crease if hung over the line. Fasten them instead by the bottom and top edges on two parallel lines, if possible.

Tablecloths, sheets and other flat arti-

cles that are to be ironed, can be taken off the line while still slightly damp, folded and smoothed. This prevents "setting in" wrinkles. If they are to be ironed later, roll carefully and wrap in a plastic bag. Place in the refrigerator or freezer until ready to iron.

Flat Drying

Clothing that must be stretched back to shape, such as washable woolen sweaters, usually are dried on a flat surface. Squeeze (don't wring) out excess water. Roll in a bath towel to absorb as much more water as possible to speed drying. Spread on a dry towel and gently stretch back to shape. If exact fit is important, draw an outline of the piece on plain paper before washing and reshape while damp to fit the outline. It's easier to take a little extra trouble when washing and drying than to lose five pounds so you can wear it again.

Drying screens that allow air to get at both sides of the garment are available. These screens can be hung on the line.

In the Dryer

Usually loads that are washed together can be dried together. Heavy fabrics are best dried together, since they take a longer time than lightweight items.
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As in washing, be sure clothes have enough room to tumble freely. They dry more quickly and with fewer wrinkles. Large and bulky pieces should be dried in small loads. Very small loads of just a few lightweight items dry better if two dry terrycloth towels are added for better tumbling.

Check the owner's manual for your dryer to determine the proper size of load. Remember, the proper load in the dryer means more even and faster drying and much less ironing.

Drying Time

Drying time depends on:

The size of the load:

The kinds of fabrics, lightweight or

heavy:

The amount of moisture in the load before drying starts.

Room temperature, humidity and venting conditions also can affect the drying time.

All Dryers offer some control of the two most important elements in clothes drying—TIME and TEMPERATURE.

Many Dryers control Time by means of a manual timer which can be set for any length of time desired up to 90 minutes. (Some slower drying models offer timer selection up to 3 hours).

The most modern Dryers have eliminated this need to guess at the time. They provide a direct "sensing" system which actually "feels" the clothes and senses when they are dry, at which point it automatically turns the Dryer off. This eliminates the annoyance of underdrying and also prevents overdrying which is both harmful to fabrics and wasteful of fuel. These models have a control which you can adjust for more or less dryness.

40
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The basic Dryer models also offer a choice of temperature control. This will vary from a simple two-position (Hi—Low) control to one which offers an infinite number of settings.

Some of the newest Dryers on the market today have even eliminated this need to guess at which temperature is best for each type of drying load. They accomplish this by automatically reducing the heat as the clothes near the end of their drying cycle. This insures that you get only as much heat as the clothes can absorb.

To test for dryness, pull an item partway out of the machine, allowing it to cool.

For a load that you may want to iron, set the control to Damp Dry, or, if your dryer does not have this feature set the timer for a shorter-than-normal drying period.

"Ironing" in the Dryer

Overdrying and overloading the dryer cause wrinkling. Leaving clothes in the dryer after it stops has the same effect. Properly used, a dryer should turn out many items either ready for just touch-up ironing or ready to be smoothed, folded or hung and put away.

Permanent press and wash-and-wear

garments must be tumble dried for best results. The heat in the dryer actually smooths out wrinkles. Drip drying is not only messy but makes touch-up ironing necessary.

These types of fabrics can be "ironed" in the dryer to remove wrinkles from store

packing, hanging in a crowded closet or packing in a suitcase. It is only necessary to tumble the clothes in the dryer with heat for 10 minutes. Clothes left in the dryer after it shuts off can also be dewrinkled by retumbling for 10 minutes with heat.

Cotton knits may shrink from overdrying. Remove from dryer when slightly damp, smooth to shape, fold and finish drying on top of the dryer. If shrinkage occurs due to complete drying, merely rewet item and start drying process again. Shrink-controlled cotton knits that need no reshaping are available.

Curtains, draperies and slipcovers

may need no ironing if they are dried in small loads and hung at windows or replaced on furniture while slightly damp.

Glass fiber fabrics should not be tumble dried unless otherwise stated on label. Always check the tag to be sure the fabric, whatever its fiber content, is machine dryable.

Drying Special Items

Almost everything you wash can be dried in an automatic dryer except glass fibers, knitted woolens, pleated skirts that are not permanent press, rubber and other temperature sensitive items. Check the label or hang tag for washing and drying instructions. If there is no label or tag and you are not sure of the fiber content, have the item dry cleaned.

Flammable cleaning fluids and dryers don't mix; together, they can be combustible.

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11 Ways To Dry
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Take out spots with a non-flammable agent, such as Energine (see pages 22-24 for Stain Chart) and hang the item out doors until the fluid has entirely-evaporated.

Starched Fabrics

Dry starched items in a separate load, but be sure not to overdry or the starch will flake off. Remove while still damp if you intend to iron immediately. While the dryer is still warm, wipe the inside with a damp cloth to prevent starch buildup or transfer to other loads.

Tinted Fabrics

Be sure tinted items are rinsed thoroughly (until the rinse water runs clear) before drying in your dryer.

After removing fabrics from dryer, wipe the inside of the dryer with a damp cloth to be sure no dye is left to stain the next load.

Plastics

Shower curtains, tablecloths, baby panties and other plastic or plastic coated items must be dried at low heat for about 2 or 3 minutes. Be sure to remove from dryer immediately. A few minutes in a slightly warm dryer removes water spots and wrinkles from plastic. Never dry rubber with heat. If you are not sure of fiber content, use the Air setting if your dryer has one.

Rubber and Foam Rubber

Rubber-backed rugs, foam rubber pillows, toys stuffed with foam rubber and similar items must be dried on the Air setting (no heat). Rubber creates a fire hazard in a heated dryer.

Tennis shoes, lingerie with elastic and garments with elastic waistbands, etc. can be dried according to fabric type and construction, just as you dry the rest of the laundry. The amount of rubber present in these items would not be

enough to cause spontaneous combustion as in the items mentioned in preceding paragraph.

Stretch Fabrics

Dry stretch fabrics according to the type of fabric. If the fabric is part wool, don't wash or dry it, unless the tag specifically states that you can.

Pillows and Stuffed Toys

Since pillows stuffed with feathers take a long time to dry, use the longest or driest setting on your machine and reset as needed until completely dry. Otherwise, you are encouraging mildew. Remove pillow and plump occasionally to move center feathers to the edge. Dry one at a time and sew into pillow slip in case ticking breaks.

Pillows stuffed with polyester also can be dried at the longest or driest setting.

Stuffed toys, if machine dryable with heat, are dried in the same manner at the longest or driest setting. Reset as needed until completely dry.

Pillows and toys stuffed with foam rubber can only be dried on the Air (no heat) setting.

Bedspreads and Quilted Items

Bedspreads with heavy borders or fringe and quilted items should be removed from dryer while slightly damp, and smoothed to shape or stretched gently.

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Fold and finish drying on the top of the dryer.

Blankets and Woolens

Blankets made of synthetic fibers, such as Orion and Acrilan, are dried just as other synthetic fiber items, for a relatively short time. Remove when completely dry. Only dry one at a time because of bulk. If your machine has a wash-and-wear setting, use it for these materials.

Woolens and electric blankets and sheets should be dried with special care. Check your owner's manual for special instructions for your particular dryer. Otherwise, use the following method:

Preheat dryer for 5 minutes with several dry terrycloth towels. Add one blanket or sheet (leaving towels in dryer) and tumble for 10-15 minutes with heat. Remove while still slightly damp and complete drying on a flat surface or hang over parallel clothes lines.

If necessary, raise the nap by brushing with a stiff brush lengthwise of the blanket. If binding or edges are puckered, stretch and smooth gently.

Woolens labeled machine washable and machine dryable usually have detailed laundering instructions on label or hang tag. If there are no instructions, dry them in the same manner as woolen blankets. Remove while slightly damp and gently stretch to shape. Finish dry-

ing on a flat surface or on the line in a net drying screen. Do not pin directly to the line.

Bonus Features

A dryer can perform many extra chores besides the obvious job of drying the family laundry.

Wet snowsuits, mittens and other wet winter items can be dried and ready for use in short order.

Tumble drying helps remove coarse lint and shreds of face tissues.

Wrinkles in velvet and corduroy can be "steamed" out by tumbling for 15-20 minutes with a damp terry towel in a preheated dryer.

If your dryer has an Air setting, use it to fluff and freshen blankets, bedspreads and pillows; dust curtains, draperies and slipcovers; freshen items stored in moth balls or crystals.

In the next chapter, we'll suggest ways to shorten ironing time with new equipment appearing on the market or by using what you have to the best advantage.
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ironing

shortcuts

The new homemaker has a tremendous advantage in that she can choose to buy garments and household items that require minimum care: permanent press sheets, pillowcases, garments, tablecloths and napkins; glass fiber bedspreads, curtains and draperies.

Established households include many items purchased before synthetic fabrics and finishes became the rule rather than the exception. This means more starching, sprinkling and ironing.

But, young bride or mother of four, the day is still to come when you can discard your iron completely. Fortunately, when the old woodburning stove moved from the kitchen to the antique shop, the heavy, non-electric flatiron went with it.

Ironing Equipment

Modern irons are electric and depend on heat rather than weight to smooth fabrics. Controls maintain proper heat for the type of fabric. Most have dials that can be set for Silk, Rayon, Cotton, Linen, etc. Steam irons and steam and

spray irons have eliminated the need to sprinkle many garments. All irons come with operating instructions that should be followed for best results.

If you have a large family and a great amount of flat work to be ironed, you may want to invest in an ironing machine. They are available in both table top and cabinet models.

Even ironing boards have taken on a "new look." Many are adjustable for height, with open metal work surface to dissipate heat and treated covers to prevent scorching. Be sure the board is well padded. It means smoother ironing results. Sleeve boards and various padded pressing shapes help ease ironing chores and are almost a necessity for the home seamstress.

Washing and drying clothes and household items by machine in small, uncrowded loads gives you a head start with ironing. Fewer wrinkles are "set" in. All permanent press and many wash-and-wear items and synthetics can be put on hangers or smoothed and folded as they come from the dryer, if they are removed as soon as the dryer stops. (Refer to the chapter, "Ways To Dry" on page 39)-

Whether you dry in a dryer or on a clothesline, removing clothes while they are very slightly damp allows you to fold and smooth many things without resorting to the iron. Just be sure everything is thoroughly dry before putting into drawers.

If you plan to iron the same day, take clothes from the dryer or line while they
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are damp dry. Fold or roll carefully to eliminate more wrinkling; wrap in an air-tight plastic bag for at least 30 minutes to allow moisture to spread evenly. If you can't get to the ironing that day, place the wrapped things into the refrigerator or freezer. They'll keep at least two days without mildewing.

If you want to put off ironing, dry items completely and stack loosely (don't pack) in container.

When you are ready to iron, either sprinkle with warm water (it absorbs faster than cold) or use the automatic sprinkler feature in your dryer, if it has one. Check the dryer's operating instructions. After sprinkling, fold or roll clothes; place in plastic bag for at least 30 minutes.

If possible, plan to allow enough time for an hour or more storage in the refrigerator or freezer. Chilled items iron more easily.

Ironing Technique

A general rule is to iron lengthwise of the fabric to prevent stretching. Collars, cuffs and facings usually are ironed first,

since they take the longest to dry and the most handling.

Hang clothes or fold immediately, fastening hooks, buttoning and closing zippers. Allow to dry completely before putting away or wearing, because damp garments will wrinkle and the creases will relax.

Pile fabrics, such as velvet and corduroy, and nubby textured fabrics will retain their texture if ironed on the wrong side over a terrycloth towel. Laces, cutwork and materials with a raised pattern are ironed the same way.

Dark fabrics, silks, acetates, rayons, linens and some wools must be pressed on the wrong side to prevent shine.

For fabrics of this type, use a pressing cloth for ironing on the right side. A damp pressing cloth will also help remove shine from the seat of trousers, etc.

When ironing an item for the first time, check the label before you start. If there are no instructions and you are not sure of the fiber content, use a low heat setting for an inside seam as a test. Test trim or lace the same way. If the fabric is a blend of fibers, set the iron for the fiber that requires the lowest heat setting.

Be sure pre-starched clothes are uniformly damp. If you are using a spray starch, follow instructions on the starch can. Don't use any type of starch on fabrics that have been rinsed in a fabric softener. The combination makes clothes stick to your iron.

Remember, clothes washed and dried with care will return the favor by needing less ironing (and they'll wear longer, too).

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12 Ironing Shortcuts
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Section IV Laundry Area Planning

providing for total clothes care

Kitchens, bathrooms, family rooms— all receive careful planning for both function and appearance. Why not the laundry area? It need not be elaborate, but it should suit you and your living and work habits. Whether you have space to spare or just a nook to work in, a little planning can make your laundry

job more pleasant and easier.

There are many steps involved in total clothes care. (Some are illustrated below.)

If you make provisions for as many of these steps as possible in one location, you can save time and effort.

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Minimum Needs for the Laundry Center

The new homemaker can start planning her laundry area with her first appliance purchase, adding as she goes. If you are already an "old pro" at clothes care, you may already have most of the equipment. For you, it is a question of improving your work area, possibly even relocating it for greater efficiency, or fitting it into a new home.

We'll get into location in the chapter beginning on page 54. Here, we discuss basic requirements.

Gathering and Sorting

A wheeled cart is a true convenience. With it you can go from room to room, gathering soiled washables. If it has several sections, you can also sort as you go (white and colorfast, non color-fast, extra-soiled).

In a multi-story house or a one-story with basement laundry, a clothes chute from bathroom or bedroom area can empty into a container near the laundry center.

Bins, hampers or baskets in the laundry area allow you to sort and then store soiled clothes until ready to wash. Adequate counter space is an absolute necessity for both sorting and folding when clothes come from the dryer or off the line. Allow five feet of space, if possible.

Because synthetic fabrics, wash-and-wear and permanent press require hanging as they come from the dryer, you will need a rack of some sort.

Washing and Drying

However you wash and dry your clothes now, leave room in your plans for more complete equipment later. You may have

an automatic washer, but no dryer at present, for instance. Leaving space can save you headaches later. If your next machine is to have a Suds Saver feature, provide either a single or double laundry tub, each tub holding at least 20 gallons of water. These tubs also come in handy for pretreating and spotting.

Obviously, there must be a supply of hot and cold water, adequate drainage, and electrical and gas lines (if dryer is gas). Although a few models of dryers and combination washer-dryers vent down the drain pipe, most dryers require some sort of outside venting to carry off the moist air. This means installation at an outside wall where the vent can go through the wall or through a window.

Proper plumbing is essential to proper operation of an automatic washer. Threaded hot and cold water faucets should be within five feet of the water inlets on the back of the machine, providing a minimum water pressure of ten pounds per square inch and a maximum of 120 pounds per square inch. The drain must have a capacity of 14 gallons a minute.

Automatic washers require a 120-volt, 60-cycle, 15 or 20 ampere fused electrical supply. Most manufacturers recommend that an automatic washer or dryer be served by a separate circuit— not one shared with other appliances.

Conventional washers (with wringers or spin basket) can be plugged into a regular 120-volt wall outlet. Most dryers require a 120/240-volt, 60-cycle circuit, fused to 30 amperes and used for the dryer alone. Dryers that operate on gas also require electricity to operate the drum, but only a 120-volt line (on a separate circuit).

These are only guidelines. Your plumber and electrician will have complete information on local codes that apply to hooking up the automatic equipment.

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13 Providing For Total Clothes Care
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If you dry clothes on a line, allow 20 feet per person, with lines at least 8 inches apart.

Other Facilities

For best washing results, your water heater should provide water at 130\xB0 to 140\xB0 F at the washer. If the heater has a small capacity (less than 30 gallons) or is at some distance from the washer, you may want to install an auxiliary water heater in the laundry area. There are models available that fit under a counter, giving you the added benefit of extra space for sorting and folding.

Plan to store all of your laundry aids near the washer, preferably in an overhead cabinet if you have small children.

But whether you use cabinets or shelving, adjustable shelves are a help because cleaning products come in assorted sizes and shapes.

Don't try to work in the dark. Cheerful, non-glare lighting is as important when doing the laundry as for cooking or reading.

The Total Clothes Care Center

Your space will put some limitations on what auxiliary jobs you will do in the laundry area, but careful planning can make the space do double duty. For instance, a laundry tub not only allows you to re-use wash water but can be used for spotting and pretreatment. An undercounter water heater serves as folding space.

Having mending supplies on hand encourages the "stitch-in-time saves nine" habit. If you incorporate both a sewing machine and ironing board (plus ironing machine if you have one), you have a complete home laundry and sewing center in one, taking less space than two separate areas since they share counter space, storage, etc. A wall or panel of perforated hardboard can be used to mount shelves as well as sewing supplies and measuring utensils for the laundry.

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The Clutter Room

Think of all the once-in-a-while projects you do in some handy corner of the house:

Gift wrapping

Potting plants, arranging flowers Furniture refinishing Handicrafts or hobby, such as painting, typing, letter writing

These are all activities that create clut-

ter, give your home a "lived-in" look that you would probably not want guests to share. A clutter room can give you space to enjoy these projects without having to tidy up when the doorbell rings. This is, of course, the logical place for your laundry and sewing room also, since many of the facilities can be shared.

If you are remodeling or building, outline for your architect or builder what activities the room must encompass, so that wiring, plumbing and lighting are adequate. Cabinets, shelves, countertops and even worktables can be built-in during construction and included in the remodeling loan or mortgage.

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13 Providing For Total Clothes Care
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The sketch shows a clutter room that includes all the basic elements for a complete work center. Although this is an "ideal" room from both size and equipment standpoints, many of the ideas can be adapted to the space you have and the money you can spend.

Your present home may offer space for a clutter room. Possible sites are a basement, garage, den or family room. Just be sure it has a door to close on the "clutter."

In the next chapter, we'll give space requirements for appliances, storage and "elbow room."

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how much space do you need?

The elements of a laundry center are counters for sorting and folding; shelves for storage of laundry aids; a place to hang things after ironing or drying; washer and dryer. To this basic list can be added storage for soiled and for clean clothes; sink or stationary tubs; ironing board and mending equipment.

How these things are arranged depends somewhat on the location of the laundry

center; whether everything must tuck away neatly, as in a hallway, or if ironing board, mending, etc. can be left in sight, as in a utility room or basement. But wherever it goes, the laundry area will be most convenient if it is planned for the way you work.

Each homemaker handles her laundry a little differently, but the usual work flow goes like this: sorting soiled clothes; mending; spot and stain treatment; washing and starching; drying; folding and hanging from dryer; sprinkling and ironing.

This means counter space, washer and sink or stationary tub grouped together; shelves or cabinets above washer for laundry aids and basic mending supplies; possibly bins or hampers under counter topping for storing soiled clothes.

Facing or next to this area would be the dryer, flanked by counter space; ironing board; rack or clothes closet for hanging; shelves over dryer or counter for temporary storage of folded and ironed items; possibly a place to store ironing board; iron, etc.
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Depending on how much space you have and where the laundry center is located, counter tops, shelves and cabinets may have to do double duty.

Minimum Space Requirements

The question usually resolves itself into how to use available space to best advantage and still have "elbow room" in which to work. You will need two sets of dimensions to plan your laundry center; equipment dimensions and minimum working space.

Equipment Dimensions

Although your present laundry area will be based on the equipment you have now, think ahead to what you hope to add in the future. For one thing, it is less expensive to have all wiring and plumbing installed at the same time. And, don't tie yourself down to space that cannot be adapted to later purchases.

The following dimensions are based on maximum size of equipment now on the market, including space for wiring and plumbing.

Washing

Automatic washers—up to 31" wide, 30" deep.

Combination washer-dryer—up to 36" wide, 30" deep.

Wringer washer—up to 31" wide, 31" deep.

Washer with spinner—up to 44" wide, 24"deep.

Laundry tubs—single, up to 24" wide, 24" deep.

—double, up to 48" wide,

24" deep.

Drying

Automatic dryer—up to 32" wide, 30" deep.

Clothes line drying—20 feet per person, at least 8" apart.

Ironing

Electric ironer (opened)—up to 65" wide, 30" deep.

Ironing board—up to 54" wide, 15" deep.

Chair—up to 18" wide, 20" deep. Hanging rack—up to 24" wide, 24" deep.

Counter space

Minimum of 30" wide, 24" deep; 60" wide, 24" deep, if possible.

Laundry cart or basket

Single—up to 15" wide, 20" deep.

Minimum Working Space

The location of the laundry center affects the work space needed. Is it a main passageway? Will appliances be facing each other across an aisle? Where will you set up the ironing board, or will it drop down from a closet door or cupboard?

If the laundry area is in a passageway, the aisle should be at least 4 feet wide. If appliances will face each other across the aisle, even though it is not a main thoroughfare, again allow 4 feet. This gives you room to maneuver without acrobatics.

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For the Washer, Dryer, or Combination Washer-Dryer

Minimum work space in front of washer, dryer or combination washer-dryer is l>l/2 feet- All dryers and combinations

and some washers are front, rather than top loaders. Be sure these machines are placed for convenient door opening. You should be able to easily transfer clothes from washer to dryer.

For Ironing

For either ironing board or ironing machine, work space should be at least 5'10" wide. Allow a minimum depth of 6 inches behind the board and 21/2 feet in front of it, or a total of 3 feet (plus 15" for the board). This gives you room for a chair or laundry cart or basket.

If you use a rack for hanging, allow a minimum of 2'4" at one side of the rack and at the end of it.

Now that you have a mental picture of what you want in your laundry center, consider the best location. The next chapter shows what you do with what you have; planned remodeling; and the new home.

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14 How Much Space Do You Need?
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location of the laundry center

As automatic washers and dryers have become more attractive and compact, the laundry center has moved up from the basement and into the family living area.

The combination washer-dryer, taking up only one half the space of separate units, is particularly adaptable to cramped quarters and odd-sized areas.

These new appliances make it possible to create a laundry center in any area of your home where plumbing facilities and venting, when necessary, can be provided.

This often makes it possible to bring the laundry center closer to the clothing center of the home and save time and steps in the collecting and distribution of the laundry.

Points to Consider

Your laundry center, wherever it is located, must meet your own needs. You can weigh the advantages and disadvantages of various locations by considering these factors:

• Available plumbing (water and drainage).

• Outside venting (for dryer).

• Noise level.

• Facilities that can be shared (counters, sink).

• Distance to where soiled laundry accumulates and where clean clothes and linens are used.

• Stairs to climb.

• Place to leave things out (ironing board, sewing).

• Total space available.

Places to Consider

The Utility Room

A separate utility room is a great boon to the homemaker. It is usually located next to the kitchen and offers space for combining several activities. If your home does not have a separate utility room, consider converting part of the garage, breezeway or nearby little-used bedroom. If you have a utility room, consider the addition of extra cabinets, shelves and counters for added convenience and activities.

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Unfinished Utility Room—Basic Laundry Center

Finished Utility Room—Full Laundry Center

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15 Location of the Laundry Center
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PC*.

In the Bedroom Area

Most of the soiled linens and clothing originate in the bedroom area of your home. What better spot for the laundry then, than at the source. The bedroom area is used less during the day than any

other area in the home. Folding or sliding doors can shut off the view of the appliances at other times. If your dryer or combination washer-dryer requires outside venting, be sure the location can be vented.

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In the Bathroom

Large old fashioned bathrooms and bath-dressing room combinations offer the space needed for a fairly complete laundry area. Here again, you are close to the source of soiled clothing and linen.

Venting, plumbing and noise usually are no problem and there is a sink handy for spotting. However, it is doubtful that you would have the space (or the inclination) to iron here.

Before Addition of Laundry Area

Remodeled Bathroom Area After Addition of Laundry Appliances

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15 Location of the Laundry Center
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In the Family Room

Close to family activities and probably the television set, the family room offers you a place to carry on all of the steps involved in total clothes care—washing, drying, ironing and sewing—while enjoying your family's company. The

laundry can be closed off behind folding doors when necessary. These advantages should be weighed against the distance of the family room from the bedroom-bathroom area where soiled laundry accumulates and noise that may interfere with family activities.

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The Kitchen

Although the kitchen is convenient to many of your homemaking activities, with plumbing, counters and cabinets at hand, it poses the problem of handling soiled clothing in the same area where you prepare food. It is wise to

separate the two work areas with a counter or divider of some sort. A hallway or back entry leading into the kitchen is a convenient spot for a laundry center. Distance from the bedroom-bathroom area may be a disadvantage.

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15 Location of the Laundry Center
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In the Basement

Although a basement laundry means stairs to climb, it has points in its favor— space, plumbing, outside venting and no worry about noise level. Unfinished work can be left in sight. This is an excellent location for a complete clutter

room, combining laundry, hobbies, sewing, etc. There is no reason why this area should be dim and strictly utilitarian. Painted or tiled floor, painted walls, glare-free lighting and brightly painted shelving and cabinets lighten the work and brighten the outlook.

Basic Basement Laundry Center

Finished Basement Clutter Room and Full Laundry Center
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In Nooks and Crannies

There are all sorts of spaces that can be adapted to the laundering. Typical areas are under stairways, pantries, service porches, closets and wide hallways.

Suitability is based on nearness to plumbing, ventilation or venting and clothing source. Unless you live in a very mild climate, the space must also be heated.

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15 Location of the Laundry Center
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Utilizing a Hallway or a Service Porch for the Laundry Center

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When You Build

This is your opportunity to put your full talents to work as an organizer and as a decorator. For even the laundry center can be both attractive and functional.

Because you are starting from "scratch," you can review the house plans with builder or architect for the most convenient location for the laundry area. At this stage, it is also possible to add a little extra space for the laundry at very little extra cost.





























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15 Location of the Laundry Center
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While the house is still in the blueprint stage, is also the time to decide on the environment in which you will work. Washable woodwork and paneling; canvas-backed wallpaper, and vinyl flooring and counter-tops lend themselves to easy upkeep and pleasant surroundings. Plan for good lighting, too,

and enough electrical outlets. If built-in cabinets and shelving are beyond your budget, consider unpainted furniture that you can finish yourself.

Make it as pleasant and convenient as possible.

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Section V Appliance Buying Guide

know what you are looking for

A washer and/or dryer is a long term investment. When you shop, know your needs, what you expect of each appliance and how much you can afford to pay for it.

And don't forget that your needs will change in the future. Choose the appliances that fit your way of living now.




And will still be adequate as your family grows.

The type of clothes you wash (work clothes, play clothes, lightly soiled clothes) will determine the type of wash and rinse cycles on the washer and the time and heat controls on the dryer.

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16 Know What You Are Looking For
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Where the appliance will be located (basement, kitchen, closet) has a bearing on size, type of venting and type of controls. If washer or dryer is at some distance from the center of household activities, a completely automatic (programmed) appliance can save time and steps. A combination washer-dryer relieves you of transferring clothes from one unit to another, while it fits into half the space.

Your budget may have the last word on an appliance purchase. A low priced model of a name brand automatic appliance that carries a good warranty and can be serviced no matter where you move, will give you years of use at

an economical price. The same is true of conventional washers.

Shop and Compare Values

Armed with a firm idea of what you want, shop and compare values, based on available features, reliability (of both the product and the seller), quality, parts and service warranty, service availability and price.

First, decide where or how you want to shop:
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What name brands you want to inspect.

Which model best suits your needs and budget.

Programmed Automatic Washer

Automatic Washer
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Take Your Time

As you shop, take your time. Ask questions. Don't settle for a "canned" sales talk or vague answers. You are making a purchase which you will use for a number of years. Plan to allow the salesman sufficient time to explain the features that are available to you. If this is your first automatic washer, you will find this explanation very educational. If you have previously owned an automatic, you will be amazed at the new benefits available to make your clothes care easier.

Ask for a demonstration of what the laundry appliance will do and how each step is controlled. Read the warranty, especially the fine print.

Types of Washers and Dryers

The basic types of laundry equipment on the market today fall into one of these categories: automatic washer, conventional washer (with wringer or spin basket), combination washer-dryer, separate dryer (gas or electric). All of these are described in the section, "Ways to Wash," beginning on page 27.

Expect a warranty with the following minimum provisions:

Item Guarantee Length Free Parts Replacement Labor
Mechanical or electrical parts 2 years 2 years 1 year
Porcelain enamel service parts 30 days 30 days 30 days
Gear Case Parts (automatic only) 5 years 5 years 1 year

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washer and dryer design features

Automatic Washers

All name brand washers being sold today get clothes "really clean". Therefore, when you shop for a washer, concentrate more on choosing design features that best satisfy your needs for the amount of money you have to spend, rather than the machine that washes cleanest.

These features include choice of agitation and spin speeds; number of rinses; choice of wash and rinse water temperatures; water level controls; lint removal and dispensers. Washers also vary in just how automatic they are, as discussed in the section, "Ways to Wash", beginning on page 27. The more choices of temperature and speed, the more different types of clothing and household items can be washed by machine; the more automatic its operation the more free time for you.

In this chapter, we'll tell you what features you can expect to find on low priced, medium-priced, and top-of-the-line models.

Agitation and Spin Speeds

Only the very lowest priced washers now offer just one agitation speed. Two agitation speeds are fairly standard, with some manufacturers offering a top

model with infinitely variable speeds, between the HIGH and LOW SPEEDS.

Low-end models may have one spin speed (about 600 revolutions per minute) but most now offer an additional slow speed (about 400 rpm) for wash-and-wear and permanent press. One top model has infinite speed selection between maximum and minimum speeds.

Rinses

All machines have a deep rinse plus a variety of extra rinses to flush away loosened dirt, detergent, lint, etc. Automatic washers with solid baskets may provide an overflow rinse during which water is pumped into and out of the machine without agitation. Washers with perforated baskets may provide a deep rinse during which water flows out through the basket and then a spin to carry out heavy soil. Other types of rinses include spray rinses that subject the load to a hard spray of water either before or after the deep rinse; an automatic second deep rinse; and cool down rinses for wash-and-wear and permanent press.

Soak or Pre-Wash

Most middle and top-of-the-line models offer an automatic soak or pre-wash cycle for extra soiled items, such as diapers. In models with a detergent dispenser, with an automatic pre-wash, you add detergent to the tub before

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17 Washer and Dryer Design Features
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adding clothes. Additional detergent is put into the detergent dispenser. When the pre-wash is complete, the tub drains and spins out the dirty water before refilling for the regular wash cycle. The detergent in the dispenser then is added automatically at the proper time in the wash cycle.

Water Temperature

All washers give you at least a choice of hot or warm wash water and warm or cold rinse water. Top models have hot, warm and cold wash water settings. One even has a medium wash water selection. (Remember, however, the water will never be hotter than your house supply.)

Water Level and Suds Return

At least two water levels are standard on most washers—full tub and partially full tub. Top models provide several water levels; in many you can fill the tub to any desired level between low and high. Positive (or pressure) fill machines do not begin to wash until selected water level is reached. Timed fill models have a set number of minutes in which to reach a certain level. If water pressure is low, the tub will not fill completely in the time allotted.

INFINITE WATER LEVEL LO---HI---RESET

Suds return, allowing you to reuse wash water, is available on most models at extra cost. (This could be important if your hot water supply is limited.)

Lint Removal and Automatic Dispensers

Look for a lint filter that is easy to remove for cleaning. Some top models have self-cleaning filters. Always sort clothes so that those that produce lint

are not washed with those that collect lint.

Bleach, detergent and fabric softener dispensers are offered on most top-line washers, although not all manufacturers furnish all three. Some medium-priced models also provide one or more of these dispensers. Automatic dispensers not only free you from running back and forth to the machine, but add laundry aids at exactly the right time.

Cycles and Automation

To take the guesswork out of washing, manufacturers have actually "programmed" washers to make all choices for you once you have pressed the button or dialed for the type of load and amount of soil. Programmed cycles are available in both middle and top price models.

On lower priced models you choose all of the washing conditions yourself. Many of the programmed washers also give you the option of manual selection.

Wash-and-Wear/Permanent Press Cycles

Most appliance manufacturers have incorporated some kind of special feature to help you realize the maximum benefits of both wash-and-wear and permanent press fabrics and garments. These include a cool down period between washing and spinning and/or gentle agitation and spin speeds. One manufacturer provides a cold water spray rinse with a gentle spin cycle; another, reduction of agitation speed from high to low, partial drainage of wash water and refill with cold water to cool clothes gradually.

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Automatic Dryers

Dryers also are offered in bottom, middle and top-of-the-line models, with price dependent on number of features or flexibility.

Most low-priced dryers give you a choice of drying time and temperature, lint screen, a choice of venting, and cool down cycle.

Middle-of-the-line machines give you the flexibility needed to dry almost anything you wash. Some provide time

control plus a measure-of-dryness control; others, a reduction of heat input as dryness progresses; tumble and no tumble drying; dewrinkling cycle and Air setting.

Controls on the top-of-the-line models (and on some medium-priced models) "sense" moisture content of the load and shut off automatically when clothes are dry. Some dryers have controls that can be set for degree of dryness desired. Other features on top models are two speeds, programmed cycles, air fresheners and automatic dampeners.

There are no-vent dryers available for situations where outside venting is impossible. However, the choice is very limited and these dryers are expensive.

Programmed Automatic Dryer

Automatic Dryer

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17 Washer and Dryer Design Features
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Combination Washer Dryer

Conventional Washers

Both types of conventional washers (with wringer and with spin basket) can be used wherever there is hot and cold water available and a sink or drain. They are usually on rollers, not perma-

Combinations also are available in various price ranges, with the same types of features found on the separate units.

nently installed.

Lowest priced models offer only one agitation speed, limiting the types of items that can be washed safely. Size and pressure choices of the wringer rollers increase from low to medium and medium to top-line models.

Top models feature such conveniences as end-of-wash signals, automatic shut-off, lint filters and two speeds.
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before you call the serviceman

suggestions and you can save yourself time and money.

First Aid for the Washer

There you are with a huge mound of soiled clothes and a washer, dryer or combination washer-dryer that won't operate. What to do? Stop! Don't call the serviceman yet.

The trouble may be so simple that you can correct it right now and get on with the laundry. Each make of washer, dryer and combination is different, but the following checklist applies to most manufacturers' products. Follow the

If water doesn't fill or fill is slow:

— Make sure inlet hoses are not kinked, or hooked-up improperly—i.e. — hot to cold and cold to hot!

— Check to see that hot and cold water faucets are on all the way.

—Check water flow and pressure at a nearby faucet or at inlet to the machine.

— Check for clogged inlet hose screen at water faucet and the screen in the inlet valve (where hoses are attached to machine.)

If water is too hot or too cold:

— Make sure both water faucets are on all the way.

— Check to see if water inlet hoses are reversed.

—Check hot water temperature at nearby faucet.

— Check cycle setting against owner's manual to be sure you have chosen the right cycle for the temperature you want.

If the Machine Won't Run

Check to see that the electric cord is plugged in. Make sure control is set in operating position. Some knobs must be pushed in or pulled out to start the machine. Check fuse box for blown fuse. Combinations and separate electric dryers have two fuses in your house fuse box. Make sure door or lid is closed.

18 Before You Call the Serviceman
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If timer does not advance:

—Timer may be in Fill position with no water coming into the machine. See "If water doesn't fill."

—Timer will not advance and washer will not agitate until water has filled to the correct level on most washers.

If clothes do not spin dry:

—Be sure door or lid is closed. As a safety feature, most machines do not spin unless door or lid is closed.

— Check to see if you have chosen proper cycle for high speed spinning.

—In combination washer-dryer, clean wash filter and rubber gasket under filter lid.

— Put clothes through a second deep rinse. You may have a "suds lock" from too many suds.

If water is leaking onto floor:

—Oversudsing will cause foam to over-

flow drain pipe.

—Tighten hose connections at faucets.

—Check drain hose for proper location in standpipe or tub.

—Be sure drain is open.

— If machine has removable filter, make sure filter is tightened securely.

If bleach, fabric softener or detergent

dispenser doesn't work:

—Clean reservoir according to directions in your owner's manual.

—A few specialty detergents and soap flakes are difficult to dissolve and may not dispense completely. It is best to put these products directly in the washer tub before water and clothes are added. Fabric softeners should be diluted before putting in dispenser.

If machine moves on the floor:

—Make sure all four feet are solidly on

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the floor. If not, adjust according to instructions in installation instructions.

—Be sure shipping blocks have been removed from machine if the machine has just been installed. See installation instructions.

—Check to see that load is evenly distributed.

First Aid for the Dryer

If dryer doesn't heat:

— If you have a gas unit, check to see if gas supply is on.

— If your gas dryer has a constant burning pilot, check to see if it is on.

— For an electric dryer, check both fuses in the house fuse box. It is possible for dryer to operate without heat if just one of the fuses is blown.

—Make sure machine is not set for AIR only operation.

If clothes are too dry or not dry

enough:

—Adjust dryness control for more or less dryness; timer for more or less time.

—Be sure exhaust pipe is not clogged.

—Check lint screen and clean if necessary. Lint screen should be cleaned after every load.

If the timer does not advance:

— In the automatic cycle of some dryer and combination washer-dryer models, the timer does not advance until the clothes are almost dry.

The Combination Washer-Dryer

The checklist given above for separate washers and dryers also applies to the combination units.
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General Index

Page

Acrylics (Orion, Acrilan, Creslan, Sayelle)

Drying..................................3. 40, 43

Properties........................................3

Washing.............................3, 29, 32, 34

All-Purpose Cleaners.................................18

Ammonia..............................................18

Bedspreads and Quilted Items

Drying...........................................42

Washing..........................................32

Blankets

Drying.....................................37, 43

Washing..........................................34

Bleaches

All-fabrics bleaches.............................15

Liquid chlorine..................................14

Powdered chlorine................................14

Warnings about mixing with other aids .. 15, 18

Bluing...........................................15, 16

Coated Fabrics........................................6

Combination Washer-Dryer Problems

See "Washing Machine Problems".. .73, 74, 75

See "Dryer Problems".............................75

Cottons

Drying.......................................40, 41

Ironing dark cottons.............................45

Properties........................................2

Washing.......................................29-32

Curtains and Draperies

Drying...........................................41

Washing......................................32, 35

Detergents (synthetic)

Amount to use................................29, 30

Normal-sudsing...................................13

Low-sudsing......................................13

Properties.......................................12

Warnings about mixing with other aids............18

Diapers

Conditioners.....................................17

Drying..............................See "Cottons"

Pre-treatment................................17, 35

Washing..........................................35

Disinfectants........................................17

Dryer Problems.......................................75

Drying Clothes (general types)

Flat drying......................................39

Line drying......................................39

Machine drying................................39-43

Ironing in dryer..............................41

Time and Temperature..........................40

Drying Special Items

Bedspreads and quilted items................42, 43

Glass fibers.....................................41

Knitted cottons..................................41

Knitted woolens..................................39

Pillows..........................................42

Plastics.........................................42

Pleated skirts...................................41

Rubber and foam rubber...........................42

Page

Starched items....................................42

Toys..............................................42

Durable Press

See "Permanent Press".............................41

Electric Sheets and Blankets

Drying............................................43

Washing...........................................34

Fabrics

Buying..........................................9-11

Bonded.............................................5

Knitted............................................4

Non-woven..........................................5

Stretch............................................5

Woven..............................................4

Fabric Softeners

JJse..............................................15

Warnings about mixing with other aids.............18

Fibers

Man-made.........................................2-4

Natural............................................2

Finishes (Koratron, Sanforizing,

Scotchgard, Zelan, Zepel)..........................5

Glass Fiber

Drying............................................41

Washing...........................................35

Gray Laundry

Cause.............................................19

Cure..............................................19

Prevention........................................30

Ground-In Dirt

In delicates......................................32

Pre-treatment.....................................21

Hand Washing.........................................33

Hard Water

Cause and cure (chart).............................8

Causes grayed laundry..............................8

Measurement....................................... 8

Heavy Soil

In delicate fabrics...............................32

Overnight soak....................................19

Pre-treatment.....................................21

Ironing

Boards and pressing shapes........................44

Dark fabrics......................................45

In the dryer......................................41

Laces.............................................45

Pile fabrics......................................45

Sprinkling........................................45

Storing dampened clothes..........................45

Wools.............................................45

Laundry Area

Equipment dimensions..............................52

Location.....................................54-64

Minimum needs.................................47, 48

Planning work flow............................51, 52

Total clothes care center....................48-50

Working space................................52-53

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Page

Page

Laundry Supplies.................................12-18

See type of product

In final rinse......................................18

in wash water.......................................18

Warnings about mixing with other aids...............18

Linen

Drying..............................................40

Ironing.............................................45

Washing.........................................29, 32

Modacrylics (Dynel, Verel)

Drying..............................................40

Washing.....................................29, 32, 34

Nylon

Drying..............................................40

Stretch fabrics......................................5

Washing.........................................29, 32

Olefins..................................................3

Permanent Press

Buying..........................................10, 11

Definition............................5, 6, 10, 11

Drying..............................................41

Washing.....................................29, 31, 32

Pillows

Drying..............................................42

Washing.............................................35

Plastic and Plastic Coated Fabrics

Drying..............................................42

Washing..............................................6

Polyesters (Dacron, Duralon, Fortrel, Kodel, Vycron)

Drying...........................................3, 41

Properties...........................................3

Washing.....................................29, 32, 34

Pre-Wash................................................32

Rayons (Acetates, Triacetates, Viscose)

Drying.......................................2, 3, 40

Ironing.............................................45

Properties......................................2, 3

Washing...............................29, 31, 32, 34

Rubber and Foam Rubber

Drying..............................................42

Washing (See "Pillows").............................35

Silk

Drying..............................................40

Ironing......................................... 45

Properties...........................................2

Washing.....................................29, 31, 32

Slipcovers

Drying..............................................41

Washing.............................................35

Soaking

Delicates...........................................32

Overnight soaking...................................19

Soaps...................................................13

Sorting Clothes..................................25, 26

Sample loads........................................26

Size of load........................................26

Spandex Fibers (Lycra, Numa, Vyrene)

Drying..............................................42

Properties.........................................4

Washing...........................................32

Spot Treatment

Chart..........................................22-24

Procedures........................................21

Supplies..........................................21

Stain Treatment

See "Spot Treatment"

Starching

Drying starched items.............................42

In the machine....................................36

Ironing...........................................45

Types of starch...............................16, 17

Stretch Fabrics

Drying.........................................5, 42

Types...........................................5, 6

Washing.........................................4, 5

Synthetic Fabrics

Drying............................................41

Ironing...........................................45

Washing.................................26, 32, 34

Tinting

Drying tinted pieces..............................42

Tinting in the machine............................36

Toys

Drying............................................42

Washing (See "Pillows")...........................35

Wash-and-Wear Fabrics

Drying............................................41

Washing........................................29-35

Yellowing.........................................20

Wash and Rinse Water

Temperature, agitation and spin speeds..........32

Extra rinse.......................................31

Laundry supplies............................12-18

Amount of detergent..................... .. 30

Washing Machine Problems..............73, 74, 75

Washing Special Items See name of item Water

Contaminants.....................................7,8

Problems, cures....................................8

Water Conditioners (packaged)

Use.........................................13, 14

Warnings about mixing with other aids.............18

Whiteners (brighteners)..............................16

Wool

Drying....................................37, 39, 43

Ironing...........................................45

Properties.........................................2

Washing...................................29, 32, 34

Yellow Laundry

General yellowing, cause and cure...........19, 20

Prevention..............................20, 30

Iron, Rust, Red Clay cause, cure..................20

Prevention....................................20

Wash-and-Wear, cause, cure........................20

Prevention....................................20

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How to Plan your own Laundry Area

\xA6

mmmm
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It's easy to plan your own laundry area!

The graph-like page opposite is scaled so that each quarter-inch square represents one square foot in your home. The laundry appliances and accessories printed below are scaled proportionately in size.

Just measure the area you are planning to use or remodel for your laundry center and outline the full area on the opposite page.

Cut out the laundry appliances and accessories that you plan to include in your laundry. Full cutout represents maximum dimensions for appliances. If you plan to use Kenmore appliances, cut off shaded areas for exact dimensions of Kenmore laundry equipment.

You can make your own additional planning "cut-outs" for tables, cabinets, chairs, etc. by drawing them at 1/2" size for each measured foot and arranging them in your master plan. It's fun and you'll be amazed at your ability to plan an efficient, workable laundry area to minimize your clothes care chores.

AUTOMATIC

WASHER

-------------1

COMBINATION WASHER DRYER

WRINGER

WASHER

WASHER

SPINNER

SINGLE

TUB

DOUBLE TUB

AUTOMATIC

DRYER

IRONER

(OPEN)

HANGING

RACK

COUNTER

SPACE

COUNTER SPACE

LAUNDRY CART

IRONING BOARD

79
Page 79:

Laundry Notes

80


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Thumbnail Image of Download Blackstone Automatic Washer 350 Owners Manual
Complete owners manual and operating instructions pack with every Blackstone model 350 washer in the mid 1950's.


Automatic Washers
Published by:
Blackstone
1957 28 22mb $5.99
Introductory Price of $3.99


ends in:
1 day
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Thumbnail Image of Download 1942-1952 Frigidaire Electric Range Parts Catalog
Complete parts listing for all 1942 to 1952 Frigidaire Ranges.

Models include: A 6-42, Al-6, B 10-42. B 15-42, B-17. B-17-LL. B-17, BI-17C, B50-42, B 60-42, Bl-60, B 70-42, BC 5-42, BC 6-42, B 50-42, B 60-42, Bl-60, B70-42, BC5-42, BC 6-42, RK-3, RK-3D, RK-3S, RK-4, RK-4D, RK-10, RK-20, RK-205, RK-40, RK-60, RK-70, R-15, R-17, RM-10, RM-17, RM-3, RM-4, RM-27, RM-30, RM-35, RM-65, RM-45, RL-45, RM-75, RO-10, RO-20, RO-20-2, RO-30, RO-35, RO-30-2, RO-35-2, RO-10-2, RO-12, RO-15-S, RO-40, RO-40-2, RO-50, RO-50-2, RO-60, RO-60-2, RO-70, RO-70-2.

Shows all parts and part numbers, including special accessories. Having the manufacturers part number for the part you need is essential for doing internet/eBay searches to locate these rare, no longer available parts. In many circumstances they can be found once you know the part number. This guide is essential for anyone who has any 1938 to 1952 Frigidaire Range.
Ranges/Stoves
Published by:
Frigidaire
1952 179 66mb $7.99
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Thumbnail Image of Download 1938-1945 Frigidaire Electric Range Service Manual
Complete Service Manual including wiring diagrams for the earliest of the GM Frigidaire Electric Ranges. 1938-1945 Models.

Models include: L-20, B-20, B-60, L-40, B-40, A-5, L-10-39, B-20-39, B-30-39, B-40-39, B-60-39, A-6, BC-5, BC-6, L-10-40, B-15-40, B-20-40, B-30-40, B-40-40, B-60-40, B-70-40, A-6, B-10-41, BC-5, B-15-41, BC-6, B-35-41, B-45-41, B-60-41, B-70-41, B-17, B-17 LL.

If you are looking for the parts catalog to these models, please check this document:
1942-1952 Frigidaire Parts Catalog
Ranges/Stoves
Published by:
Frigidaire
1952 107 114mb $7.99
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Thumbnail Image of Download 1946-1951 Frigidaire Electric Range Service Manual
Complete Service Manual including wiring diagrams for the GM Frigidaire Electric Ranges for 1946-1951 Models.

Models include: BI-17, BI-17C, BI-60, RJ-30, RJ-10, RJ-20, RJ-30, RJ-40, RJ-60, RJ-70, RK-3, RK-3D, RK-4, RK-10, RK-20, RK-40, RK-60, RK-70, R-15, RM-10, RM-35, R-17, RM-17, RM-45, RL-45, RM-3, RM-27, RM-65, RM-4, RM-30, RM-75, R0-10, R0-20, R0-30, R0-35, R0-40, R0-50, R0-60, R0-70.

If you are looking for the parts catalog to these models, please check this document:
1942-1952 Frigidaire Parts Catalog
Ranges/Stoves
Published by:
Frigidaire
1952 93 112mb $7.99
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Thumbnail Image of Download 1958 Frigidaire Dishwasher Tech-Talk Service Manual
Here is the full Tech-Talk service manual for all 1958 Frigidaire Under-counter made by General Motors and Portable Frigidaire dishwashers made by D&M.

Models include:
DW-IUZ Under-counter Model,
DW-DUZ Under-counter Model,
DW-IFZ Free Standing Model,
DW-ISZ Sink Combination Model,
DW-SMZ Super Mobile Model

Specifications, Cycle charts and full servicing information included.
Dishwashers
Published by:
Frigidaire
1958 60 56mb $5.99
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Thumbnail Image of Download 1961 Frigidaire Portable Dishwasher Tech-Talk Service Manual
Here is the full Tech-Talk service manual for all 1961 Frigidaire D&M made portable dishwashers.

Models include:
DW-STB and DW-DTB Frigidaire Automatic Dishwashers

Specifications, Cycle charts and full servicing information included.
Dishwashers
Published by:
Frigidaire
1961 60 35mb $5.99
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Thumbnail Image of Download 1965 Frigidaire Dishwasher J-Line Tech-Talk Service Manual
Here is the full Tech-Talk service manual for all 1965 Frigidaire Under-counter made by General Motors and Portable Frigidaire dishwashers made by D&M.

Models include:
DW-DUJ, DW-IUJ, DW-SMJ, DW-DMJ,
DW-IMJ Dishwashers

Specifications, Cycle charts and full servicing information included.
Dishwashers
Published by:
Frigidaire
1964 64 59mb $5.99
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Thumbnail Image of Download 1955 Frigidaire Range Parts Catalog
Complete parts diagrams with breakdowns and part numbers for all 1955 Frigidaire Ranges.

Models included: RV-3, RV-4, RV-10, RV-15, RV-20, RV-25, RV-26, RV-30, RV-35, RV-38, RV-45, RV-60, RV-70. RV-25G, RV-251G, RV-252G, RV-38G, RV-381G, RV-382G, RV-45G, RV-70G, RV-701G AND RV-702G.

Shows all parts and part numbers, including special accessories. Having the manufacturers part number for the part you need is essential for doing internet/eBay searches to locate these rare, no longer available parts. In many circumstances they can be found once you know the part number. This guide is essential for anyone who has any vintage Frigidaire Range.
Ranges/Stoves
Published by:
Frigidaire
1955 66 40mb $7.99
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Thumbnail Image of Download Modern Home Laundry Planning Guide by Hamilton
Here is a beautiful guide filled with wonderful water-color images of different areas of the home where a laundry can be installed.


Automatic Washers & Dryers
Published by:
Hamilton
1961 16 40mb $5.99
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Thumbnail Image of Download Maytag Wringer Washer Service Manual
This is a comprehensive service manual for many of the electric Maytag Wringer washers made from 1933 thru 1957 and beyond. Serial number identification chart is included to help determine the approximate date of your machine. Full repair and rebuild instructions are included.

Models included: 80, 90, F, 15, 10, 110, 18, 25, N10, A, 30, 32, E, J, N, E2, J2, N2.

If you are looking for the gas Maytag wringer washer service manual please see this manual...

Maytag Gas and Electric Washer Service Manual
Wringer Washers
Published by:
Maytag
1957 56 51mb $7.99
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Thumbnail Image of Download Hoover Cylinder Vacuum Salesman Flip-Chart Book
Here is the advertising flip-chart book that Hoover salesmen took into prospective buyers homes to show the housewife the great new Hoover Cylinder vacuum cleaner!!


Vacuum Cleaners
Published by:
Hoover
1950 19 18mb $5.99
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Thumbnail Image of Download 1972 Blackstone Automatic Washer Service Manual
Complete service manual to Blackstone washers models BA-415, BA-525, BA-625 and BA-825.


Automatic Washers
Published by:
Blackstone
1972 36 27mb $5.99
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Thumbnail Image of Download 1972 Blackstone Washers and Dryer Brochure
Here are some beautiful brochures for Blackstone Automatic Washers models BA-825, BA-525, BA-415 and Dryers BE/BG-525. Images and Specifications included.


Automatic Washers & Dryers
Published by:
Blackstone
1972 12 30mb $5.99
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Thumbnail Image of Download Whirlpool Automatic Washer Operating Instructions
Complete Use & Care Guide and Operating Instructions packed with Whirlpool washer models: LWA7700 and Suds-Miser Model LWA-7705.


Automatic Washers
Published by:
Whirlpool
1970 24 32mb $5.99
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Thumbnail Image of Download 1969 Maytag Top Loading Portable Dishwasher Service Manual
Here is the service manual to Maytag's very first portable dishwasher model WP600.

Sections include:
Loading and Operating Instructions,
How it Works,
Wiring Diagrams and Circuits,
Complete servicing procedures.
Dishwashers
Published by:
Maytag
1969 49 53mb $5.99
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Thumbnail Image of Download 1971 Maytag Dishwasher Service and Parts Manual
Here is the service manual to Maytag's very first built-in and front loading portable dishwashers. These were the early direct drive pump models.

Models include WU600, WU400, WU200, WC400, WC200.

Sections include:
Loading and Operating Instructions,
How it Works,
Cycle Sequence Charts,
Wiring Diagrams and Circuits,
Complete troubleshooting and servicing procedures,
Parts listing section.

Parts section shows all parts and part numbers. Having the manufacturers part number for the part you need is essential for doing internet/eBay searches to locate these rare, no longer available parts. In many circumstances they can be found once you know the part number.

Dishwashers
Published by:
Maytag
1970 157 135mb $7.99
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Thumbnail Image of Download 1975 Maytag Dishwasher Service and Parts Manual
Here is the service manual to Maytag's very first built-in and front loading portable dishwashers. These were the belt-drive pump models.

Models include WU601, WU401, WU201, WC401, WC201.

Sections include:
Loading and Operating Instructions,
How it Works,
Cycle Sequence Charts,
Wiring Diagrams and Circuits,
Complete troubleshooting and servicing procedures,
Parts listing section.

Parts section shows all parts and part numbers. Having the manufacturers part number for the part you need is essential for doing internet/eBay searches to locate these rare, no longer available parts. In many circumstances they can be found once you know the part number.



Dishwashers
Published by:
Maytag
1970 109 95mb $7.99
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Thumbnail Image of Download 1974 Kelvinator Washer Line Fold-Out Brochure
Here is a sales literature brochure from Kelvinator showing off their Franklin made automatic washer line. Images, specifications and descriptions of each machine are included.

Models include: W510G, W520G, W610G, W624G, W640G, W840G and W870G.

This poster is scanned in at a very high resolution (600dpi) for close up viewing.
Automatic Washers
Published by:
Kelvinator
1974 2 38mb $5.99
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Thumbnail Image of Download Electrical Dealer Magazine - October 1952
Electrical Dealer Magazine is a fun magazine to read for any collector or enthusiast of vintage appliances, electronics and other vintage home products. This highly entertaining magazine covered the retail sales and merchandising areas of Major Appliances, Small Appliances, Small Electrics, Radios, Televisions and other electric home products from the mid-20th century. This was the Life and Look Magazine of the appliance world, in the same large size 10x13 format.


October 1952 Issue
25th Anniversary Issue


PART 1- THE PAST as recorded by ELECTRICAL DEALER
The Product Story- 20 page pictorial review of the history and significant developments in Appliances: Washers, Dryers, Ironers, Hot Water Heaters, Ranges, Refrigerators, Dishwashers, Vacuum Cleaners, Fans, Air Conditioners, Food Mixers, Housewares, Sewing Machines, Electric Blankets, Clocks, Electric Kitchens, Irons, Toasters, Radios, Television. For the Automatic Washer, they show the invoice of the very first sale of the Bendix in 1937!

The Dealer Story--Pioneers in retailing electrical appliances
The Salesman's Story- A new business was launched by specialists
The Distributor Story--The backbone of modern marketing
The Advertising Story-History of Appliance Advertising
The Time Payment Story- Financing plans make mass selling possible
The ELECTRICAL DEALER STORY-History of a growing magazine
Looking Back-Promotion ideas from the early days

PART II- THE PRESENT as a milestone of industry progress
The Fifth Freedom-A report to consumers on electrical living
There's Always Room At The Top- Little known facts about men in the news

PART Ill- THE FUTURE as viewed by marketing and advertising experts
The Presidents' Forum-Industry executives predictions
Marketing And Advertising Forum-The five -year outlook
Can These Be Tomorrow's "Growth Appliances"- A designer's conception
From Cubby Holes To Showrooms- Appliance centers go modern

Great full page ads including:

Laundry Equipment:
ABC-O-Matic Automatic Washer
Speed Queen Dryer and Wringer Washer
Laundry Queen "Truly" Automatic Washer
Bendix Washer and Dryer
Apex Automatic Washer and Dishwasher
Tide's Frigidiare Washer Promotion
Dexter Wringer Washers
Woman's Friend Wringer Washers
Whirlpool Washer and Dryer showing both St. Joseph and Clyde Plants
Thor Automatic and Semi-Automatic Washers
Easy Spindrier Washers and Easy Wringer
Hamilton Dryers

Dishwashers:
American Kitchens Dishwasher
Crosley Dishwasher

Vacuum Cleaners:
Royal
Lewyt
Hoover
Apex Strato-Cleaner
Cadallic
Universal Jet-99
Eureka
Trade Publications
Published by:
Electrical Dealer
1952 228 125mb $12.99
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Thumbnail Image of Download Here it is - The Great New Maytag Automatic Washer
This is a guide given to dealers and service personnel introduction Maytag's very first automatic washer. It contains adorable mid-century style illustrations describing the new machine in great detail. Explains how it works, what the cycle does and how to take it apart and troubleshoot any issue.


Automatic Washers
Published by:
Maytag
1949 54 35mb $5.99
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Thumbnail Image of Download Assorted Small Appliances Dealer Catalog
Great brochures from a dealer catalog of small appliances and clocks.

Products Include:

Hamilton Beach Mixer

Hamilton Beach Mixette hand Mixer

Wearing Blendors: Deluxe, Chrome, Standard, Duo-Speed and Hand Mixer

Cory Vacuum Coffee Maker, Cory Electric Knife Shapener

Toastmaster Super Deluxe Toaster and Toaster 1B14

Fryrette Deep Fryer

Robeson Percolator Coffee Makers Crown, Princess, Avalon and Copper Classic Models

Durabilt Traveling Irons

Westclox Moonbeam Electric Alarm Clock, Sphnix, Big Ben, Greenwich, Logan, Electric Switch and Bantam Desk Clocks, Melody, Belfast, Orb and Monitor Commercial Electric Wall Clocks.

Lux Swinging Bird, Bobbing Bird, Colorful Clown and Rudolph Red Nose Clocks, Lux Minute-Minder Timers, Lux Claridge, Harvester, Chilton, Spinning Wheel, Fairview and Grist Mill Clocks

Seth Thomas Clocks, Rudder, Glance, Cathay, Belwyn, Accent, Poise, Sharon, Lynton, Filedston, Dynaire, Buckingham, Baxter, Northbury, Legacy, Kenbury, Medbury, Brookfield, Pippin, Homestead, Plaza, Manager clocks.

Arvin Portable Electric Heaters
Small Appliances
Published by:
Generic Catalog
1954 32 81mb $5.99
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Thumbnail Image of Download 1960 Frigidaire Built-In Cooking Appliances Tech-Talk Service and Parts Manual
Very comprehensive service manual for all 1960 Frigidaire Built-In Wall Ovens, Cook-tops and Fold-Back Surface Units. Models include:

BUILT-IN WALL OVENS-MODELS RBB-90, RBB-92, RBB-93, RBB-94, RBGB-94, RBB-98, RBB-99 and RBGB-99

BUILT-IN COOKING TOPS, MODELS RBB-100, RBB-101, RBB-102CH and RBB-201.

FOLD-BACK SURFACE UNITS-MODELS RBB-81, RBB-82 and RBB-84.

Service manual includes wiring diagrams. Parts section shows all parts and part numbers. Having the manufacturers part number for the part you need is essential for doing internet/eBay searches to locate these rare, no longer available parts. In many circumstances they can be found once you know the part number. This guide is essential for anyone who has any vintage Frigidaire Range.
Ranges/Stoves
Published by:
Frigidaire
1963 156 123mb $9.99
Add to download cart
Thumbnail Image of Download Cooper Home Supply Catalog
This is one of the more unusal catalogs I have ever seen. It's a great reference of home products of the mid 1950's. It contains, major appliances, TV and electronics, small appliances and other household goods. Many major manufactures are represented with multiple models of each type of products. A picture, description model number and price of each item offered is shown.

Products and brands include...

TELEVISION
Admiral, Philco, Stromberg-Car lson, RCA Victor, Mitchell, Dumont, Capehart, Zenith,Westinghouse, Magnavox, General Electric, Motorola, Stewart-Warner, Sylvania, Crosley,Bendix, Emerson, Andrea.

RADIOS
RCA Victor, Zenith, Philco, Admiral, Bendix,Westinghouse, Motorola, General Electric,Magnavox, Capehart, Stromberg-Carlson, Emerson, Stewart-Warner, Sylvania.

RECORD CHANGER, RECORDER
Webster-Chicago, RCA, Ampro, Revere, V-M.

REFRIGERATORS, FREEZERS
Servel, Gibson, Kelvinator, International Harvester, Admiral, Philco, Pak-A-Way, Coolerator, Bendix, Deepfreeze, Crosley, Westinghouse, Thor, General Electric, Quicfrez, Norge, Hotpoint, Frigidaire, General Chef, Astral.

ELECTRIC RANGES
General Electric, Deepfreeze, Gibson, Frigi•daire, Hotpoint, Kelvinator, Admiral, Bendix,RCA Estate, Coolerator, Crosley, Thor, Philco, Norge, Westinghouse, Welbilt.

GAS RANGES
Welbilt, Norge, Magic Chef, Detroit-Jewel, Maytag, RCA Estate, Florence.

KITCHEN CABINETS, SINKS, DISHWASHERS
Apex, Crosley, Kelvinator, General Electric,Hotpoint, Cory, Tracy, Kitchenaid, American Kitchens, Youngstown, Westinghouse.

LAUNDRY EQUIPMENT
Thor, Whirlpool, Bendix, Blackstone, Hamilton, Kelvinator, Westinghouse, Maytag, Frigidaire, Easy, Hotpoint, Crosley, Simplex, General Electric, Norge, Ironrite, Apex, Conlon, Naxon, Empire, Launder-King, Handyhot, Monitor.

WATER HEATERS
Westinghouse, Hotpoint, Crosley, Norge, Deepfreeze, Duo-Therm, General Electric, Toastmaster.

HEATERS
DuoTherm, Electromode, Knapp•Monarch,Magic Chef, Arvin, Fresh'nd-Aire, Tropic-Aire, Mimar, LaSalle, Handyhot, Emerson-Electric, Electresteem.

DEHUMIDIFIERS
Berns Air King, Frigidaire, Fedders, Hotpoint,Westinghouse, RCA, Mitchell, Fresh'nd-Aire, Admiral.

SEWING MACHINES
Domestic, Free-Westinghouse.

VACUUM CLEANERS, FLOOR POLISHERS, CARPET SWEEPERS
Royal, Eureka, Lewyt, Apex, Gilbert, Westinghouse, Universal, Hamilton Beach, Hoover, General Electric, Regina, General, Shetland, Wagner, Bissell.

HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCE
Universal, Holliwood, Rotiss-O-Mat, BroilQuik, Broilking, Silv-A-King, General Slicing, Silex, Cory, Nicro, Continental, Sunbeam, Ritz, Dulane, Westinghouse, Waring, Kidde, Darmeyer, Naxon, Casco, Hoover, General Electric,Nesco, Everhot, Tropic-Aire, Knapp-Monarch,Kitchenaid, Manning-Bowman, Gilbert, Sperti,Mimar, Oster, Electresteem, Hamilton-Beach,Camfield, American Beauty, Toastmaster, General Mills, Rival, Juice King, Arvin, Durabilt,Proctor, Presto, Farberware, Wearever, Mirro, Revere, Ekco, Flint, Handyhot, Hankscraft.

SHAVERS
Remington, Rolls, Schick, Norelco.

SCALES
Borg, Detecto, Counselor, Health•O•Meter.

TYPEWRITERS
Underwood, Smith-Corona, Remington.

DOOR BELLS/ CHIME
Nutone, Rittenhouse, Edwards .

CHRISTMAS LIGHTS
Noma.

LUGGAGE

TOYS
Gilbert

CLOCKS
General Electric, Telechron, Jefferson.

STERLING SILVER
International Sterling, Reed & Barton, Gorham.

SILVERPLATED FLATWARE
Community, 1847 Rogers Bros., Wm. Rogers &Son, Gorham, Tudor, Holmes & Edwards.

ELECTRIC TRAINS
Lionel, American Flyer.

TOOLS
Skil, Black & Decker Utility, Revere, Casco.

PENS, PENCILS, CIGARETTE LIGHTERS
Ronson, Parker, Sheaffer, Norma.

PHOTOGRAPHIC EQUIPMENT
Ansco, Ampro, Argus, Weston, Kalart, Victor,Bell & Howell, DeJur, Bolsey, Polaroid-Land,Graflex, Crown Graphic, Speed Graphic, Keystone, Radiant, Dalite, Revere, Kodak.
Full Catalog
Published by:
Cooper Supply
1954 100 165mb $7.99
Add to download cart
Thumbnail Image of Download 1968 Frigidaire Flair and Twin-30 Electric Range Tech-Talk Service Manual
Very comprehensive service manual for all 1968 Frigidaire Flair and Twin-30 Electric Ranges. Service manual includes wiring diagrams. Models include:

FLAIR RANGES Models: RCD-630N, RCD-630VN, RCI-635N, RCI-635VN, RCI-645N and RCI-645VN

TWIN 30 ELECTRIC RANGES Models: RCD-637N , RCI-639VN and RCIE-639VN

Looking for the parts catalog for Flair Ranges, please see this manual:
Frigidaire Flair Parts Catalog



Looking for a Use and Care Guide for Frigidaire Flair Ranges? Please see this manual: Frigidaire Flair Owners Manual

Ranges/Stoves
Published by:
Frigidaire
1966 72 58mb $7.99
Add to download cart
Thumbnail Image of Download 1966 Frigidaire Flair and Freestanding Electric Range Tech-Talk Service Manual
Very comprehensive service manual for all 1966 Frigidaire Electric Ranges. Service manual includes wiring diagrams. Models include:

FLAIR RANGES Models: RCD-630K, RCI-635K, RCI-645K

FREE-STANDING RANGES Models: RSA-30K, RS-30K, RS-35K, RD-35K, RDG-38K, RDE-38K, RD-39K, RCDG-39K, RCIE-39K, RS-1 OK, RDD-15K, RD-20K, RDD-20K, RD-71K, RCDG-SSK, RCIG-75K

TWIN 30 ELECTRIC RANGES Models: RD-637K, RCI-639K, RCJ-639VK, RCIE-639K, RCIE-639VK

Looking for the parts catalog for Flair Ranges, please see this manual:
Frigidaire Flair Parts Catalog



Looking for a Use and Care Guide for Frigidaire Flair Ranges? Please see this manual: Frigidaire Flair Owners Manual

Ranges/Stoves
Published by:
Frigidaire
1966 120 64mb $7.99

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Please note that all publications presented here at Automatic Ephemera are on average between 35 and 85 years old. This information is presented as a educational/historical reference on vintage products of the past. Any trademarks or brand names appearing on this site are for nominative use to accurately describe the content contained in these publications. The associated trademarks are the sole property of their registered owners as there is no affiliation between Automatic Ephemera and these companies. No connection to or endorsement by the trademark owners is to be construed.