VINTAGE OWNER'S MANUALS, SERVICE MANUALS, BROCHURES AND PUBLICATIONS
FAQ
Your Recent Purchases
Contact Us
Home
Welcome to Automatic Ephemera, an independent organization/library for historical research and education, sharing public domain documents relating to vintage products.


 


Please search through our database, we have hundreds of available documents...

Search Publisher: 
   Restrict to Product: 

Full Text Search of Automatic Ephemera:   

Clear and Start New Search


Review Selections & Checkout


The Quick and Easy Way to Beautiful Ironing


Published by Ironrite in 1960-- "Instruction handbook for use with Ironrite Automatic Ironer"

Full owners manual and operating instructions to the Model 95 Ironrite Automatic Ironer.

Number of Pages: 20
File Size: 11mb
Download Fee: $3.99

  Add The Quick and Easy Way to Beautiful Ironing to cart
Please note that all publications presented here at Automatic Ephemera are on average between 35 and 85 years old. This information is presented as a educational/historical reference on vintage products of the past. Any trademarks or brand names appearing on this site are for nominative use to accurately describe the content contained in these publications. The associated trademarks are the sole property of their registered owners as there is no affiliation between Automatic Ephemera and these companies. No connection to or endorsement by the trademark owners is to be construed.


Review Selections & Checkout

Here is an automated summary of some of the text contained in:
The Quick and Easy Way to Beautiful Ironing
Published in 1960

Important: Please note the summary text below was created by electronically reading the scanned images with optical character recognition software (ocr). OCR technolgoy is not yet perfected and you might see some spelling and formatting errors in the preview text below. These errors are not actually in the final product, the download file you will receive is a pure clean high-resolution scan of the original document, containing all text, graphics and photos exactly as originally printed.
Page 1:

INSTRUCTION HANDBOOK FOR USE WITH IRONRITE AUTOMATIC IRONER

Page 2:

Custom Ironrite Automatic Ironer

This is your new Ironrite 95 Automatic Ironer. It has certain unique features which contribute to speed and ease of ironing.

Ironrite

Special Feature

Two completely usable open ends allow you to use both ends of your ironer. This makes for greater versatility, and enables you to iron any and all types of garments.

IRONING PLATE-the cast iron heating element that does the ironing. It is placed under the roll for greater safety. Two points (one at each end of the ironing plate) enable you to easily iron hard-to-reach sections.

THERMOSTAT CONTROL-gives you just the right heat for various types of materials (chart page 2).

HEAT SWITCH-safety light indicates when heat is on.

MOTOR SWITCH

FOLDING WINGS-for added work space.

FOLDING LAP BOARD- provides more work space.

IRON CONTROL-for starting, and raising roll while ironing.

PRESS CONTROL-for stopping.

ADJUSTABLE CASTERS

When the forming board is tipped up it may be moved to the right or the left making it easier to use the ironing points.

AUTOMATIC LIGHT

MANUAL RELEASE-to raise roll from ironing plate. Use for steaming garments, and to release garment in case of a power failure.

FORMING BOARD-for arranging garments to be ironed.

HANDLE

Your Ironrite has a number of specially patented features - all of which are designed to make your ironing easier, faster, and better. Use the diagram to locate these features on your machine, and to familiarize yourself with their purpose. When you're ready to start ironing:

1. Open cabinet. Adjust folding wings and lap board for greater working area. Plug cord into wall connection.

2. Turn on heat switch and let ironing plate heat for 4-6 minutes.

3. Turn on motor switch. Press iron control (right knee control) lightly to bring roll down to ironing plate and start it revolving. (Do not keep knee against control.)

To stop roll momentarily while ironing (to give extra pressing or drying action for especially thick or damp portions of garment, or when you need time to arrange fabric), use press control (left knee control).

4. When you have finished, raise roll and turn off heat switch. Switch off motor, and disconnect cord. Let ironing plate cool for 20-30 minutes before covering and putting away for "next time."

NOTE-Certain models may not have custom features such as light, movable forming board, adjustable casters, etc.
Page 3:

Upside-Down Ironing

... A new concept

ONCE UPON A TIME, garments were pressed with smooth stones which had been heated in the sun. A pretty primitive way of operating-and improvements came slowly. As recently as the early 1900's, most homemakers still had only flatirons, which were heated on the stove and were heavy and hard to use. Then came the electric hand iron-a wonderful innovation. But more wonderful yet is today's modern automatic ironer which makes home laundering one of the most satisfying of household tasks- enabling you to give every item in your family's wardrobe the smooth, crisp look of elegance- and to do it with a minimum expenditure of time and energy.

Your automatic ironer operates on a totally new concept, UPSIDE-DOWN ironing, which means that the ironing board (the roll of your automatic ironer) is

on top, and the iron (the metal ironing plate which contains the heating element) is underneath. Just the opposite of hand ironing. Garments are ironed by passing between the roll and the ironing plate, and in this way, the pressure necessary to achieve that smooth, crisp look, comes from the roller-not from the arm that pushes the iron!

This is the truly wonderful thing about upside-down ironing; the reason why your automatic ironer is faster, easier, and does a better job. Additionally, when an automatic ironer has two open ends, as this one has, garments can be ironed at both the right and left ends. This makes for versatility and ease of operation; allows you to iron-beautifully- anything you can wash!

Noio, just turn the page...AND

DO IT YOURSELF!
Page 4:

Starching:

Because of the increased pressure exerted by the roll, you do not need as much starch with an automatic ironer as with a hand iron.

Flatware requires no starch at all.

Shirt collars, cuffs, and buttonhole fronts require a little more than housedresses, children's clothes or curtains.

Check directions on your starch package or bottle.

Dampening:

Use only half as much moisture as you did for hand ironing. (If you have an automatic dryer, remove clothes before they are completely dry.)

When dampening wearing apparel, sprinkle only one half of garment -then fold dry sections inside moistened part. With towels, napkins, handkerchiefs, etc., dampen only every other one, then fold several together.

Linens take heavy dampening; cottons, medium; silks, woolens, rayons, acetates and cotton blends need be only slightly damp. Some of the newer synthetics can be ironed without sprinkling, although appearance will be improved with slight dampening.

Temperature:

Set your automatic ironer at the correct temperature for the fabric you are ironing. (Be sure to read and follow hang tag instructions.)

When ironing blends of several fibers use the setting for the most sensitive fiber. If garment has been dampened, a slightly higher temperature may be used.

Use the chart below as your guide to temperature control.

(please see download file for fabric chart)
Page 5:

Some Basic Tips and Techniques

As you work with your automatic ironer, you'll find there are certain basic principles which can be applied to the ironing of many different items. Because we think it will be helpful for you to have these fundamentals together in one place, we've devoted the next three pages to a series of general tips, and techniques you'll use over and over again.

A good habit

Use both ends of your ironer equally, so padding on the roll will not become matted.

Two ways to avoid wrinkles

1. When ironing several thicknesses of material, raise roll and adjust fabric when it requires smoothing. Drop material 3" down over ironing plate before continuing.

2. Make sure that you have ironed the material thoroughly dry. Good ironing is thoroughly-dried-out ironing.

How to dry thoroughly

To dry out damp, double thicknesses (as on collars, cuffs, etc.) "hold to press." This means, stop roll from revolving by using the press control. (See diagram inside front cover.) Hold for a second or so, then start roll revolving again and continue to iron. Avoid using press control for long periods with synthetic fabrics.

When to use press cloths

Press cloths should be used for steaming, and with any fabrics that tend to develop a shine when ironed. Place cloth over forming board and ironing plate. Arrange garment to be ironed on top of press cloth.

Use with acrylics and acrylic blends of dacron, viscose and mohair; and with all blends resembling wools, wool jerseys, and gabardines.

What to do about zippers

Iron them with teeth against the roll. Dry them out thoroughly by using press control.
Page 6:

Some Basic Tips and Techniques-Continued

Button, Button

With soft plastic or shank buttons, iron between buttons over either ironing point (Fig. 1).

(Note: Before laundering, remove buttons with jeweled centers, or buttons of glass or plastic that will not withstand high temperature or pressure. Mark spot with contrasting colored thread).

Steaming

Set ironer temperature on high setting. To steam knitwear, or materials like velvet, corduroy, suede, etc., place a well-moistened terry cloth towel over ironing plate. Drape garment, nap side up, over towel (just as you would over regulation ironing board). Do not use roll, but shift garment around, brushing nap gently in one direction. Move towel frequently to release more steam.

Collars

STRAIGHT: If collar is straight, as on a man's shirt, iron flat, and press to dry (Fig. 2).

TWO-SECTION: Start half of a 2-section collar at center front. Feed in at an angle (Fig. 3). Turn on forming board to finish. Do other half in same manner.

CIRCULAR: Iron flat from outer edge to neckline. Press to dry. Iron a section at a time until collar is completed (Fig. 4).
Page 7:

Sleeves and Cuffs

LONG OR THREE-QUARTER SLEEVES: With sleeve opening up, line up cuff edge of sleeve with end of ironing plate (Fig. 5).

Iron part way up sleeve. Raise roll. Straighten fabric and iron into shoulder seam (Fig. 6).

Repeat on other side, using other end of ironer. Iron cuff gathers over point. Open cuff. Press to dry on both sides (Fig. 7). SHORT SLEEVES: Place point of sleeve under roll, with ironing point at underarm seam. Iron up armhole seam to top of sleeve. If sleeve has cuff, hold to press (Fig. 8).

Pockets

Iron patch pockets flat. Press to dry.

Slot pockets (on inside of dress, skirt or trousers) should be ironed before garment itself. To do this, place pocket over end of ironer (Fig. 9).

Ruffles and Gathers

Place gathered end of material over end of ironing plate at an angle, with gathers 1" to 3" from point of ironer. Lower roll, and hold (Fig. 10).

Spread gathers over point, and smooth fabric. Iron point of ironing plate into gathers. Hold. Repeat process until all gathers are ironed.
Page 8:

Sheets (plain)

Fold sheet lengthwise. Iron from wide hem to small hem along open side, dropping folded side off end of ironer (Fig 11). DO NOT TURN, but place sheet in lap as it comes from ironer, lining up small hems. Repeat, ironing from small hem to wide hem. Place in lap as before. Hold fabric taut, raising roll when necessary, to smooth material.

In the same manner, iron folded side from wide hem to small hem. (So far, you have ironed 3 sections of your sheet.)

An easy way to iron 4th section, and fold your sheet at the same time, is to pick up sheet as it comes from the ironer (Fig. 12)

and place in lap in a letter "U" (Fig. 13). Then pick up the four thicknesses of the large hems (Fig. 14). Sheet will fall into easy folds in lap ready for last time through ironer (Fig. 15).

Short Cut for Sheets

1. Fold sheet lengthwise

2. Iron from wide hem to narrow hem on open side

3. Iron from narrow hem to wide hem on folded side

4. Fold
Page 9:

Sheets (contour)

Fold sheet lengthwise with corners folded inside each other. With center fold at right, open side on left, iron on angle from center fold into corner (Fig. 16).

Remove from ironer. Slide to opposite end of ironer. Iron from open side into corner (Fig. 17).

Shift and straighten sheet, and iron down open side to other end of sheet. Angle into corner and continue ironing along open side until fold is reached (Fig. 18). Turn sheet. Iron down folded section to complete half of sheet.

Iron other side of sheet in same manner.

Table Cloths

To iron cloths without a crease: Iron down center. Fold lengthwise; iron, letting ironed center section drop off end of ironer. Remove tablecloth from ironer and place in lap in same position. Continue to iron rest of cloth.

For table cloths with crease: Refer to sheet instructions.

For lace or cutwork: Place raised or pattern section next to roll.

For unusually large tablecloths: Iron single. Iron down center for 10"-12". Slide cloth back and over to right, and iron 10"-12". Slide cloth back and to left, and iron 10"-12". Repeat until all of cloth is ironed. (To avoid "ripples" where cloth hangs over edge of ironer, place hands under fabric at both open ends, holding table cloth at level with ironing plate.)

Other Flatwork

TOWELS: Place hem straight on forming board. Drop over shoe 2". Do not pull on edges as towel is being ironed.

PILLOW CASES: Iron from closed end. Hold with press control, to dry hem. Alternate feed-in position from one end of ironer to the other.

For speed, fold and crease later, with stored heat in ironing plate.
Page 10:

Correct Sprinkling Speeds Ironing

• To dampen a man's shirt, line up underarm and shoulder seams, folding back inside.

• Sprinkle button front. Turn over, and sprinkle buttonhole front.

• Smooth left sleeve on left front and dampen.

• Place right sleeve on top of dampened sleeve and sprinkle side that is up.

• Dampen collar.

• Fold collar down to cuff. Fold tail end of shirt up so shirt is folded in thirds. Fold from button front.

Shirts

(size 14.5 and larger)

SLEEVES AND CUFFS: Follow procedure on page 5.

BACK: Starting at tail, with wrong side next to ironing plate, iron up to underarm (Fig. 19).

Raise roll. Pull shirt down, until yoke is over forming board and sleeves move freely over ends of ironer (Fig. 20).

Iron until points of yoke at collar are covered (Fig. 21). Center part of collar will be ironed, also.

Hold until yoke is thoroughly dry.

COLLAR: Iron flat and press to dry. Follow procedure on page 4.
Page 11:

FRONT: With buttons down, iron

across front to sleeves. Be sure point of shirt goes over point of iron (Fig. 22).

To complete front of shirt: Raise roll, draw shirt toward you until buttons are at edge of forming board. Shift shirt to right until sleeve is off board and 3d button is at edge of ironing plate (Fig. 23). Iron across to side seam.

Pick up shirt at center of collar. Turn so collar is at opposite end of ironer. Then iron buttonhole side of front, right side down.

Iron Shirts
in this order...
1. Sleeves 4. Yoke
2. Cuffs 5. Collar
3. Back 6. Two Fronts

Boys' Shirts or men's size 14 and smaller

For shirts too small for back to be ironed as above-boys' shirts, or men's size 14 and smaller:

Fold yoke across back on right side as shown (Fig. 24). Iron other half on opposite end of ironer. Follow directions above for rest of shirt. Angle back to complete below yoke. Iron collar.
Page 12:

Slacks

(Iron with fly opened).

Iron pockets: Follow procedure on page 5.

Iron top from center back to side pocket (Fig. 25).

As soon as center back seam has fallen below ironing plate, raise roll and turn slacks, so belt is parallel to roll. Lower roll, and hold (Fig. 26). Smooth material and arrange pleats-keeping them taut. Iron down to bottom of fly.

In the same manner iron other half on other end of ironer.

Place cuff of trousers between roll and ironing plate, and hold (Fig. 27). Be sure seams are lined up so front crease will coincide with front pleat. Iron legs from cuff to 6" from crotch. Raise roll to adjust extra fullness away from crease. Angle so end of point follows back seam.

Raise roll, slide trouser over to other end of ironer to finish crease (Fig. 28).

Steam Pressing

Use pressing cloth placed over ironing plate, following procedure on page 4. For tops, follow slack procedure. For legs, press one crease (Fig. 29) ; reverse trouser leg and press other crease and seam.
Page 13:

Jeans and Pajamas

Place seam edge of leg lengthwise on forming board with point of ironer at crotch. Iron across leg from inner to outer edge (Fig. 30). Raise roll and turn pants so leg drops below ironing plate. Continue ironing to waistline (Fig. 31). Iron other half on other side of ironer.

Men's Shorts

Fold one leg inside the other. Starting with fly front, place over ironing plate and iron around (Fig. 32). Turn inside out while still folded, and iron other leg on opposite end of ironer.

When The Ladies Wear The Pants

Iron pockets: Follow procedure on page 5.

Slip top of garment over end of ironing plate and iron completely around, raising roll and smoothing, when necessary. Hold, to dry double thicknesses. (Or, if puckering occurs because of fitted darts, remove garment, fold on a seam, and iron double to dart.

Continue pressing in this manner until top is completely ironed.)

When ironing legs, place one on the ironing plate lengthwise and iron from the outside seam to middle of leg.

Raise roll and fold leg so crease will fall where desired (Fig. 33). Then place on ironing plate lengthwise and iron from crease to next seam. Repeat for other side of leg.

Use same procedure for other leg.
Page 14:

Sugar 'N' Spice

Little Girls' Dresses

CLOSED SECTION OF BODICE (front or back) : Iron underarm seam of left sleeve to waist, open section, up (Fig. 34).

Raise roll, and slip bodice onto ironing plate, dropping sleeve below plate. Iron across half of closed section of bodice to waist. (Fig. 35).

Slide bodice off end of ironing plate, and iron sash diagonally.

Repeat for other side using opposite end of ironer.

COLLAR: Follow procedure on page 4.

OPEN SECTIONS OF BODICE (front or back) : Iron singly over one open end from waistline to collar, dropping skirt below ironing plate (Fig. 36). Raise roll. Fold collar down in place and iron over shoulder (Fig. 37). Using opposite end of ironer, iron other half of bodice and collar in same way.

SLEEVES: For cartwheel type, bring gathers at cuff and shoulder together, creasing in center. Iron into gathers -about 4 movements (Fig. 38).

For balloon sleeve, iron on wrong side in sections, from top of sleeve to lower edge.

SKIRT: Set hem. Iron into gathers with skirt on angle, following procedure on page 5.

Iron Little Girls' Dresses in this order...

1. Underarm Seams 4. Collar

2. Closed Sections 5. Open Sections

3. Sash 6. Sleeves

7. Skirt
Page 15:

UNDERARM: Fold double at side seam. Place lengthwise on forming board with closed section on top. Iron to dart (Fig. 39).

SLEEVES: Follow procedure on page 5.

SHOULDERS: Raise roll, drop sleeve below roll and iron across shoulder to collar (Fig. 40).

CLOSED FRONT OR BACK: Place closed section singly over ironing plate. Begin at center and iron to sleeve (Fig. 41). Angle, and iron to complete top of closed section (Fig. 42). Use opposite end of ironer to complete closed section.

OPEN FRONT OR BACK: Place tail of one open section in ironer, and hold. Iron to top. Hold to press at pockets, and when necessary, tc arrange darts. Iron from bottom of half section of blouse to armholes (Fig. 43). Raise roll, shift blouse and iron to shoulder seam.

COLLAR: Follow procedure on page 4.

BUTTONS: Follow procedure on page 4.

Iron Blouses in this order...
1. Underarms 4. Middle of Closed Section
2. Sleeves 5. Open Sections
3. Shoulders 6. Collar

Page 16:

All Dressed Up

Ladies' Dresses

SLEEVES: Follow procedure on page 5.

SHOULDERS: May be ironed double. Raise roll and shift after ironing sleeve. Fold at shoulder seam. Drop sleeve off back of ironing plate and iron across to collar. For dress with yoke, see Fig. 40, Ladies' Blouses.

UNDERARM SECTIONS: Iron double from armhole to waistline (Fig. 44). Iron other side on opposite end of ironer.

OPEN SECTIONS (front or back) : Iron from waistline to neckline or collar. If gathered at shoulder or waist, raise roll and shift to iron into gathers. Iron other half of open section on opposite end of ironer.

YOKE: If dress has yoke back, fold at bottom, on inside of dress. Place yoke on ironing plate, dropping sleeve below roll. Iron to center back. Iron balance of yoke on opposite end.

CLOSED SECTIONS (front or back) : Turn dress wrong side out, and fold bodice double at center or at seams. Place over end of ironing plate, dropping waistline gathers below plate, and iron to neckline-or to yoke, if dress has yoke (Fig. 45).

Raise roll and iron into waistline gathers, following procedure page 5. Use other end of ironer for other side of bodice. (If you wish to remove crease down center of closed section, slip opened bodice over shoe lengthwise. Hold to press.)

COLLAR AND POCKETS: Follow procedures on page 4 and 5 respectively.

SKIRT: See page 15 for procedures for different types of skirts. If skirt has unpressed pleats, iron these before doing bodice.

PRINCESS STYLE DRESS: Turn dress inside out. Pick up by seam and iron flat to next seam (Fig. 46). Repeat until fitted part of dress is finished.
Page 17:

Skirts

CHILDREN'S PLEATED SKIRTS: Skirts pleated all the way around can be placed over padded roll and pinned. Pin several pleats in place. Turn roll with hand, holding waistband taut, until pinned section is over ironing plate (Fig. 48). Bring roll down, and hold to press.

PARTIALLY PLEATED SKIRTS: Arrange pleats on a slant on forming board. Lower roll and hold, to set pleats (Fig. 49).

CIRCULAR SKIRTS: Iron from hem to waistband following straight of material, not bias (Fig. 50). Take hold of waistband, and turn skirt until bottom fits over right end of ironing plate and waistband is off left end of plate (Fig. 51). Iron with straight of material for approximately 18". Then turn and repeat from first step until completed.

STRAIGHT SKIRTS: Iron waistband double. Hold to press. (Iron front and back of waistband.)

Slip bottom of skirt over ironing plate and iron around, covering as much as possible.

Slip top of skirt over ironing plate; iron around. Angle into top when necessary.

LONGER PLEATED SKIRTS: Arrange one pleat under roll. Lower and press. Arrange next pleat, and iron until it is just caught between roll and ironing plate. Press. Continue around skirt, being sure NOT to raise roll until all pleats are ironed.

SKIRTS WITH UNPRESSED PLEATS: Pick up waistband (for dress, turn to wrong side and drop bodice inside skirt). Place over forming board on angle. Press to set pleats. Raise roll, and continue setting pleats until finished (Fig. 47, page 14).
Page 18:

Caring for your Ironer

ABC's for keeping your ironer in tiptop shape

A. When muslin cover becomes soiled or scorched: Take cover off and wash it. Remove drawstring before laundering. If bleach is used, be sure to rinse thoroughly with a vinegar or lemon solution so cover will not turn yellow due to retained bleach, plus heat.

B. To keep pad soft and fluffy: To give best results, pad should be removed, shaken up and aired occasionally (after 3-6 months use it tends to become tightly packed). Pad may also be refreshed by placing in an automatic dryer for 5-10 minutes at low, or no-heat setting, but DO NOT WASH IT.

C. How to change roll cover and pad:

1. Raise roll, untie drawstrings and unroll cover. Then unroll pad. Underneath pad you'll find a piece of burlap which is glued to roll. Unwind, but never remove burlap.

2. Turn motor switch on. As roll revolves, adjust burlap so there are l˝ turns on roll. (The balance should hang down over forming board and fall into your lap in easy folds.)

3. Press hold lever and lower roll against ironing plate (not revolving).

4. Place pad evenly on top of the burlap remaining on forming board. Start roll revolving. As padding rewinds, be sure to keep outside edges even with ends of metal roll (not extending beyond). If pad seems to be too wide, ease excess toward center.

5. Allow roll to make several turns, then stop, leaving approximately 10" of padding hanging down from forming board. DO NOT RAISE ROLL.

6. Now, place end of muslin cover on top of the padding remaining unwound (Fig. 52). Start roll revolving again and continue until cover is in place. Let roll revolve twice. Stop roll action when end of cover is between roll and ironing plate. Hold. DO NOT RAISE ROLL.

7. Pull up inner drawstring on each end of roll; then outer drawstring. Tie securely (Fig. 53). Wind extra string around bow and tuck loose ends under cover at either end of roll (Fig. 54).

(NOTE: if cover tends to wrinkle when ironing, tighten drawstrings.)
Page 19:

When It's Time for an Oil Change

The gear case in your Ironrite is located just behind the roll. The oil that accompanies the machine when it leaves the factory will keep it operating smoothly for 3 or 4 years. It should then be changed. To do this:

1. Drain off old oil by removing the plug which you'll find in the bottom of the gear case on the right side (fig. 55).

2. When oil has completely drained out, replace plug, then loosen screw in back of gear case and take off the cover (fig. 56).

3. Pour in new #S575 Ironrite oil only, (obtainable from your dealer or direct from the factory in a sealed metal can, accept no substitutes) and replace gasket.

Oil, new pads, and cover are available from your Ironrite dealer.

Page 20:

Is IRONRITE ironing faster than ironing by hand?
Yes. According to scientific tests, ironing on an Ironrite automatic ironer is 3 times faster than hand ironing.

Is it less tiring to iron on an automatic ironer?
Tests made by Ironrite on the Lauru Platform (a special electronic device that measures muscular effort) prove that hand ironing requires 1 2 times as much muscular effort as does Ironrite ironing. Additionally, cardiac tests shows that the heart returns to normal 8 times faster after ironing on an Ironrite.

Will garments ironed "automatically" look as nice as those ironed by hand?
In most cases they will look even better! Even heat allows uniform drying; greater pressure assures a crisp appearance; padded, revolving roll makes for smoothness.

What about upkeep and the cost of operation?
The need for service on ironers is the lowest in the appliance industry. The average Ironrite owner, for example, will have only one service call in 10 years or more! An Ironrite also costs less to operate than a hand iron because it is 3 times faster.

What about the safety factor?
An ironer requires only the same safety precautions that apply to a hand iron or range. The Ironrite automatic ironer is designed to reduce the possibility of accidental contact with the hot ironing plate.

How long will my IRONRITE automatic ironer last?
The life-span of an ironer is from 25-30 years or more. Periodic pad fluffing, cover replacement, and oil change will keep it in perfect operating condition.

Is it difficult to use?
Quite the contrary. The simple, basic instructions in the user's manual, will quickly enable you to give that valued "professional" look to everything you iron - from a man's shirt to frilly curtains. All the operator needs to do is guide the clothes -the ironer itself does the hard work.


Here are the 25 most recent documents added to the library...
Add
High-Res
Download
to Cart
Click Thumbnail for More Information Title
and
Description
Product Year # of Pages File
Size
Download
Fee
Add to download cart
Thumbnail Image of Download 1958 Frigidaire Dishwasher Tech-Talk Service Manual
Here is the full Tech-Talk service manual for all 1958 Frigidaire Under-counter made by General Motors and Portable Frigidaire dishwashers made by D&M.

Models include:
DW-IUZ Under-counter Model,
DW-DUZ Under-counter Model,
DW-IFZ Free Standing Model,
DW-ISZ Sink Combination Model,
DW-SMZ Super Mobile Model

Specifications, Cycle charts and full servicing information included.
Dishwashers
Published by:
Frigidaire
1958 60 56mb $5.99
Add to download cart
Thumbnail Image of Download 1961 Frigidaire Portable Dishwasher Tech-Talk Service Manual
Here is the full Tech-Talk service manual for all 1961 Frigidaire D&M made portable dishwashers.

Models include:
DW-STB and DW-DTB Frigidaire Automatic Dishwashers

Specifications, Cycle charts and full servicing information included.
Dishwashers
Published by:
Frigidaire
1961 60 35mb $5.99
Add to download cart
Thumbnail Image of Download 1965 Frigidaire Dishwasher J-Line Tech-Talk Service Manual
Here is the full Tech-Talk service manual for all 1965 Frigidaire Under-counter made by General Motors and Portable Frigidaire dishwashers made by D&M.

Models include:
DW-DUJ, DW-IUJ, DW-SMJ, DW-DMJ,
DW-IMJ Dishwashers

Specifications, Cycle charts and full servicing information included.
Dishwashers
Published by:
Frigidaire
1964 64 59mb $5.99
Add to download cart
Thumbnail Image of Download 1955 Frigidaire Range Parts Catalog
Complete parts diagrams with breakdowns and part numbers for all 1955 Frigidaire Ranges.

Models included: RV-3, RV-4, RV-10, RV-15, RV-20, RV-25, RV-26, RV-30, RV-35, RV-38, RV-45, RV-60, RV-70. RV-25G, RV-251G, RV-252G, RV-38G, RV-381G, RV-382G, RV-45G, RV-70G, RV-701G AND RV-702G.

Shows all parts and part numbers, including special accessories. Having the manufacturers part number for the part you need is essential for doing internet/eBay searches to locate these rare, no longer available parts. In many circumstances they can be found once you know the part number. This guide is essential for anyone who has any vintage Frigidaire Range.
Ranges/Stoves
Published by:
Frigidaire
1955 66 40mb $7.99
Add to download cart
Thumbnail Image of Download Modern Home Laundry Planning Guide by Hamilton
Here is a beautiful guide filled with wonderful water-color images of different areas of the home where a laundry can be installed.


Automatic Washers & Dryers
Published by:
Hamilton
1961 16 40mb $5.99
Add to download cart
Thumbnail Image of Download Maytag Wringer Washer Service Manual
This is a comprehensive service manual for many of the electric Maytag Wringer washers made from 1933 thru 1957 and beyond. Serial number identification chart is included to help determine the approximate date of your machine. Full repair and rebuild instructions are included.

Models included: 80, 90, F, 15, 10, 110, 18, 25, N10, A, 30, 32, E, J, N, E2, J2, N2.

If you are looking for the gas Maytag wringer washer service manual please see this manual...

Maytag Gas and Electric Washer Service Manual
Wringer Washers
Published by:
Maytag
1957 56 51mb $7.99
Add to download cart
Thumbnail Image of Download Hoover Cylinder Vacuum Salesman Flip-Chart Book
Here is the advertising flip-chart book that Hoover salesmen took into prospective buyers homes to show the housewife the great new Hoover Cylinder vacuum cleaner!!


Vacuum Cleaners
Published by:
Hoover
1950 19 18mb $5.99
Add to download cart
Thumbnail Image of Download 1972 Blackstone Automatic Washer Service Manual
Complete service manual to Blackstone washers models BA-415, BA-525, BA-625 and BA-825.


Automatic Washers
Published by:
Blackstone
1972 36 27mb $5.99
Add to download cart
Thumbnail Image of Download 1972 Blackstone Washers and Dryer Brochure
Here are some beautiful brochures for Blackstone Automatic Washers models BA-825, BA-525, BA-415 and Dryers BE/BG-525. Images and Specifications included.


Automatic Washers & Dryers
Published by:
Blackstone
1972 12 30mb $5.99
Add to download cart
Thumbnail Image of Download Whirlpool Automatic Washer Operating Instructions
Complete Use & Care Guide and Operating Instructions packed with Whirlpool washer models: LWA7700 and Suds-Miser Model LWA-7705.


Automatic Washers
Published by:
Whirlpool
1970 24 32mb $5.99
Add to download cart
Thumbnail Image of Download 1969 Maytag Top Loading Portable Dishwasher Service Manual
Here is the service manual to Maytag's very first portable dishwasher model WP600.

Sections include:
Loading and Operating Instructions,
How it Works,
Wiring Diagrams and Circuits,
Complete servicing procedures.
Dishwashers
Published by:
Maytag
1969 49 53mb $5.99
Add to download cart
Thumbnail Image of Download 1971 Maytag Dishwasher Service and Parts Manual
Here is the service manual to Maytag's very first built-in and front loading portable dishwashers. These were the early direct drive pump models.

Models include WU600, WU400, WU200, WC400, WC200.

Sections include:
Loading and Operating Instructions,
How it Works,
Cycle Sequence Charts,
Wiring Diagrams and Circuits,
Complete troubleshooting and servicing procedures,
Parts listing section.

Parts section shows all parts and part numbers. Having the manufacturers part number for the part you need is essential for doing internet/eBay searches to locate these rare, no longer available parts. In many circumstances they can be found once you know the part number.

Dishwashers
Published by:
Maytag
1970 157 135mb $7.99
Add to download cart
Thumbnail Image of Download 1975 Maytag Dishwasher Service and Parts Manual
Here is the service manual to Maytag's very first built-in and front loading portable dishwashers. These were the belt-drive pump models.

Models include WU601, WU401, WU201, WC401, WC201.

Sections include:
Loading and Operating Instructions,
How it Works,
Cycle Sequence Charts,
Wiring Diagrams and Circuits,
Complete troubleshooting and servicing procedures,
Parts listing section.

Parts section shows all parts and part numbers. Having the manufacturers part number for the part you need is essential for doing internet/eBay searches to locate these rare, no longer available parts. In many circumstances they can be found once you know the part number.



Dishwashers
Published by:
Maytag
1970 109 95mb $7.99
Add to download cart
Thumbnail Image of Download 1974 Kelvinator Washer Line Fold-Out Brochure
Here is a sales literature brochure from Kelvinator showing off their Franklin made automatic washer line. Images, specifications and descriptions of each machine are included.

Models include: W510G, W520G, W610G, W624G, W640G, W840G and W870G.

This poster is scanned in at a very high resolution (600dpi) for close up viewing.
Automatic Washers
Published by:
Kelvinator
1974 2 38mb $5.99
Add to download cart
Thumbnail Image of Download Electrical Dealer Magazine - October 1952
Electrical Dealer Magazine is a fun magazine to read for any collector or enthusiast of vintage appliances, electronics and other vintage home products. This highly entertaining magazine covered the retail sales and merchandising areas of Major Appliances, Small Appliances, Small Electrics, Radios, Televisions and other electric home products from the mid-20th century. This was the Life and Look Magazine of the appliance world, in the same large size 10x13 format.


October 1952 Issue
25th Anniversary Issue


PART 1- THE PAST as recorded by ELECTRICAL DEALER
The Product Story- 20 page pictorial review of the history and significant developments in Appliances: Washers, Dryers, Ironers, Hot Water Heaters, Ranges, Refrigerators, Dishwashers, Vacuum Cleaners, Fans, Air Conditioners, Food Mixers, Housewares, Sewing Machines, Electric Blankets, Clocks, Electric Kitchens, Irons, Toasters, Radios, Television. For the Automatic Washer, they show the invoice of the very first sale of the Bendix in 1937!

The Dealer Story--Pioneers in retailing electrical appliances
The Salesman's Story- A new business was launched by specialists
The Distributor Story--The backbone of modern marketing
The Advertising Story-History of Appliance Advertising
The Time Payment Story- Financing plans make mass selling possible
The ELECTRICAL DEALER STORY-History of a growing magazine
Looking Back-Promotion ideas from the early days

PART II- THE PRESENT as a milestone of industry progress
The Fifth Freedom-A report to consumers on electrical living
There's Always Room At The Top- Little known facts about men in the news

PART Ill- THE FUTURE as viewed by marketing and advertising experts
The Presidents' Forum-Industry executives predictions
Marketing And Advertising Forum-The five -year outlook
Can These Be Tomorrow's "Growth Appliances"- A designer's conception
From Cubby Holes To Showrooms- Appliance centers go modern

Great full page ads including:

Laundry Equipment:
ABC-O-Matic Automatic Washer
Speed Queen Dryer and Wringer Washer
Laundry Queen "Truly" Automatic Washer
Bendix Washer and Dryer
Apex Automatic Washer and Dishwasher
Tide's Frigidiare Washer Promotion
Dexter Wringer Washers
Woman's Friend Wringer Washers
Whirlpool Washer and Dryer showing both St. Joseph and Clyde Plants
Thor Automatic and Semi-Automatic Washers
Easy Spindrier Washers and Easy Wringer
Hamilton Dryers

Dishwashers:
American Kitchens Dishwasher
Crosley Dishwasher

Vacuum Cleaners:
Royal
Lewyt
Hoover
Apex Strato-Cleaner
Cadallic
Universal Jet-99
Eureka
Trade Publications
Published by:
Electrical Dealer
1952 228 125mb $12.99
Add to download cart
Thumbnail Image of Download Here it is - The Great New Maytag Automatic Washer
This is a guide given to dealers and service personnel introduction Maytag's very first automatic washer. It contains adorable mid-century style illustrations describing the new machine in great detail. Explains how it works, what the cycle does and how to take it apart and troubleshoot any issue.


Automatic Washers
Published by:
Maytag
1949 54 35mb $5.99
Add to download cart
Thumbnail Image of Download Assorted Small Appliances Dealer Catalog
Great brochures from a dealer catalog of small appliances and clocks.

Products Include:

Hamilton Beach Mixer

Hamilton Beach Mixette hand Mixer

Wearing Blendors: Deluxe, Chrome, Standard, Duo-Speed and Hand Mixer

Cory Vacuum Coffee Maker, Cory Electric Knife Shapener

Toastmaster Super Deluxe Toaster and Toaster 1B14

Fryrette Deep Fryer

Robeson Percolator Coffee Makers Crown, Princess, Avalon and Copper Classic Models

Durabilt Traveling Irons

Westclox Moonbeam Electric Alarm Clock, Sphnix, Big Ben, Greenwich, Logan, Electric Switch and Bantam Desk Clocks, Melody, Belfast, Orb and Monitor Commercial Electric Wall Clocks.

Lux Swinging Bird, Bobbing Bird, Colorful Clown and Rudolph Red Nose Clocks, Lux Minute-Minder Timers, Lux Claridge, Harvester, Chilton, Spinning Wheel, Fairview and Grist Mill Clocks

Seth Thomas Clocks, Rudder, Glance, Cathay, Belwyn, Accent, Poise, Sharon, Lynton, Filedston, Dynaire, Buckingham, Baxter, Northbury, Legacy, Kenbury, Medbury, Brookfield, Pippin, Homestead, Plaza, Manager clocks.

Arvin Portable Electric Heaters
Small Appliances
Published by:
Generic Catalog
1954 32 81mb $5.99
Add to download cart
Thumbnail Image of Download 1960 Frigidaire Built-In Cooking Appliances Tech-Talk Service and Parts Manual
Very comprehensive service manual for all 1960 Frigidaire Built-In Wall Ovens, Cook-tops and Fold-Back Surface Units. Models include:

BUILT-IN WALL OVENS-MODELS RBB-90, RBB-92, RBB-93, RBB-94, RBGB-94, RBB-98, RBB-99 and RBGB-99

BUILT-IN COOKING TOPS, MODELS RBB-100, RBB-101, RBB-102CH and RBB-201.

FOLD-BACK SURFACE UNITS-MODELS RBB-81, RBB-82 and RBB-84.

Service manual includes wiring diagrams. Parts section shows all parts and part numbers. Having the manufacturers part number for the part you need is essential for doing internet/eBay searches to locate these rare, no longer available parts. In many circumstances they can be found once you know the part number. This guide is essential for anyone who has any vintage Frigidaire Range.
Ranges/Stoves
Published by:
Frigidaire
1963 156 123mb $9.99
Add to download cart
Thumbnail Image of Download Cooper Home Supply Catalog
This is one of the more unusal catalogs I have ever seen. It's a great reference of home products of the mid 1950's. It contains, major appliances, TV and electronics, small appliances and other household goods. Many major manufactures are represented with multiple models of each type of products. A picture, description model number and price of each item offered is shown.

Products and brands include...

TELEVISION
Admiral, Philco, Stromberg-Car lson, RCA Victor, Mitchell, Dumont, Capehart, Zenith,Westinghouse, Magnavox, General Electric, Motorola, Stewart-Warner, Sylvania, Crosley,Bendix, Emerson, Andrea.

RADIOS
RCA Victor, Zenith, Philco, Admiral, Bendix,Westinghouse, Motorola, General Electric,Magnavox, Capehart, Stromberg-Carlson, Emerson, Stewart-Warner, Sylvania.

RECORD CHANGER, RECORDER
Webster-Chicago, RCA, Ampro, Revere, V-M.

REFRIGERATORS, FREEZERS
Servel, Gibson, Kelvinator, International Harvester, Admiral, Philco, Pak-A-Way, Coolerator, Bendix, Deepfreeze, Crosley, Westinghouse, Thor, General Electric, Quicfrez, Norge, Hotpoint, Frigidaire, General Chef, Astral.

ELECTRIC RANGES
General Electric, Deepfreeze, Gibson, Frigi•daire, Hotpoint, Kelvinator, Admiral, Bendix,RCA Estate, Coolerator, Crosley, Thor, Philco, Norge, Westinghouse, Welbilt.

GAS RANGES
Welbilt, Norge, Magic Chef, Detroit-Jewel, Maytag, RCA Estate, Florence.

KITCHEN CABINETS, SINKS, DISHWASHERS
Apex, Crosley, Kelvinator, General Electric,Hotpoint, Cory, Tracy, Kitchenaid, American Kitchens, Youngstown, Westinghouse.

LAUNDRY EQUIPMENT
Thor, Whirlpool, Bendix, Blackstone, Hamilton, Kelvinator, Westinghouse, Maytag, Frigidaire, Easy, Hotpoint, Crosley, Simplex, General Electric, Norge, Ironrite, Apex, Conlon, Naxon, Empire, Launder-King, Handyhot, Monitor.

WATER HEATERS
Westinghouse, Hotpoint, Crosley, Norge, Deepfreeze, Duo-Therm, General Electric, Toastmaster.

HEATERS
DuoTherm, Electromode, Knapp•Monarch,Magic Chef, Arvin, Fresh'nd-Aire, Tropic-Aire, Mimar, LaSalle, Handyhot, Emerson-Electric, Electresteem.

DEHUMIDIFIERS
Berns Air King, Frigidaire, Fedders, Hotpoint,Westinghouse, RCA, Mitchell, Fresh'nd-Aire, Admiral.

SEWING MACHINES
Domestic, Free-Westinghouse.

VACUUM CLEANERS, FLOOR POLISHERS, CARPET SWEEPERS
Royal, Eureka, Lewyt, Apex, Gilbert, Westinghouse, Universal, Hamilton Beach, Hoover, General Electric, Regina, General, Shetland, Wagner, Bissell.

HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCE
Universal, Holliwood, Rotiss-O-Mat, BroilQuik, Broilking, Silv-A-King, General Slicing, Silex, Cory, Nicro, Continental, Sunbeam, Ritz, Dulane, Westinghouse, Waring, Kidde, Darmeyer, Naxon, Casco, Hoover, General Electric,Nesco, Everhot, Tropic-Aire, Knapp-Monarch,Kitchenaid, Manning-Bowman, Gilbert, Sperti,Mimar, Oster, Electresteem, Hamilton-Beach,Camfield, American Beauty, Toastmaster, General Mills, Rival, Juice King, Arvin, Durabilt,Proctor, Presto, Farberware, Wearever, Mirro, Revere, Ekco, Flint, Handyhot, Hankscraft.

SHAVERS
Remington, Rolls, Schick, Norelco.

SCALES
Borg, Detecto, Counselor, Health•O•Meter.

TYPEWRITERS
Underwood, Smith-Corona, Remington.

DOOR BELLS/ CHIME
Nutone, Rittenhouse, Edwards .

CHRISTMAS LIGHTS
Noma.

LUGGAGE

TOYS
Gilbert

CLOCKS
General Electric, Telechron, Jefferson.

STERLING SILVER
International Sterling, Reed & Barton, Gorham.

SILVERPLATED FLATWARE
Community, 1847 Rogers Bros., Wm. Rogers &Son, Gorham, Tudor, Holmes & Edwards.

ELECTRIC TRAINS
Lionel, American Flyer.

TOOLS
Skil, Black & Decker Utility, Revere, Casco.

PENS, PENCILS, CIGARETTE LIGHTERS
Ronson, Parker, Sheaffer, Norma.

PHOTOGRAPHIC EQUIPMENT
Ansco, Ampro, Argus, Weston, Kalart, Victor,Bell & Howell, DeJur, Bolsey, Polaroid-Land,Graflex, Crown Graphic, Speed Graphic, Keystone, Radiant, Dalite, Revere, Kodak.
Full Catalog
Published by:
Cooper Supply
1954 100 165mb $7.99
Add to download cart
Thumbnail Image of Download 1968 Frigidaire Flair and Twin-30 Electric Range Tech-Talk Service Manual
Very comprehensive service manual for all 1968 Frigidaire Flair and Twin-30 Electric Ranges. Service manual includes wiring diagrams. Models include:

FLAIR RANGES Models: RCD-630N, RCD-630VN, RCI-635N, RCI-635VN, RCI-645N and RCI-645VN

TWIN 30 ELECTRIC RANGES Models: RCD-637N , RCI-639VN and RCIE-639VN

Looking for the parts catalog for Flair Ranges, please see this manual:
Frigidaire Flair Parts Catalog



Looking for a Use and Care Guide for Frigidaire Flair Ranges? Please see this manual: Frigidaire Flair Owners Manual

Ranges/Stoves
Published by:
Frigidaire
1966 72 58mb $7.99
Add to download cart
Thumbnail Image of Download 1966 Frigidaire Flair and Freestanding Electric Range Tech-Talk Service Manual
Very comprehensive service manual for all 1966 Frigidaire Electric Ranges. Service manual includes wiring diagrams. Models include:

FLAIR RANGES Models: RCD-630K, RCI-635K, RCI-645K

FREE-STANDING RANGES Models: RSA-30K, RS-30K, RS-35K, RD-35K, RDG-38K, RDE-38K, RD-39K, RCDG-39K, RCIE-39K, RS-1 OK, RDD-15K, RD-20K, RDD-20K, RD-71K, RCDG-SSK, RCIG-75K

TWIN 30 ELECTRIC RANGES Models: RD-637K, RCI-639K, RCJ-639VK, RCIE-639K, RCIE-639VK

Looking for the parts catalog for Flair Ranges, please see this manual:
Frigidaire Flair Parts Catalog



Looking for a Use and Care Guide for Frigidaire Flair Ranges? Please see this manual: Frigidaire Flair Owners Manual

Ranges/Stoves
Published by:
Frigidaire
1966 120 64mb $7.99
Add to download cart
Thumbnail Image of Download 1963 Frigidaire Electric Range Tech-Talk Service and Parts Manual
Very comprehensive service manual for all 1963 Frigidaire Electric Ranges. Models include:

RAE-4, RS-305-63, RS-30-63, RS-35-63, RD-38-63, RD-39-63, RCI-39-63, RS-10-63, RSD-15-63, RD-20-63, RDD-20-63, RCD-71-63, RI-55-63, RCI-75-63.

Service manual includes wiring diagrams. Parts section shows all parts and part numbers. Having the manufacturers part number for the part you need is essential for doing internet/eBay searches to locate these rare, no longer available parts. In many circumstances they can be found once you know the part number. This guide is essential for anyone who has any vintage Frigidaire Range.
Ranges/Stoves
Published by:
Frigidaire
1963 144 101mb $9.99
Add to download cart
Thumbnail Image of Download 1961-1963 Frigidaire Flair Wall Oven Tech-Talk Service and Parts Manual
Very comprehensive service and parts manual for all 1961-1963 Frigidaire Flair Wall Ovens. Models include:

Frigidaire Flair Wall Ovens: RBGB-330, RBGB-335, RBGF-345
Standard Wall Ovens: RBE-1 and RBF

Service manual includes wiring diagrams. Parts section shows all parts and part numbers. Having the manufacturers part number for the part you need is essential for doing internet/eBay searches to locate these rare, no longer available parts. In many circumstances they can be found once you know the part number. This guide is essential for anyone who has any vintage Frigidaire Range.
Ranges/Stoves
Published by:
Frigidaire
1963 144 114mb $9.99
Add to download cart
Thumbnail Image of Download 1964 Frigidaire Electric Range Tech-Talk Service
Very comprehensive service manual for all 1964 Frigidaire Electric Ranges. Models include:

RS-30S-64, RS-30-64, RD-35-64, RD-G38-64, RD-39-64, RCD-G39-64, RCI-G39-64, RS-10-64, RSD-15-64, RD-20-64, RDD-20-64, RCD-G55-64, RCD-71-64, RCI-G75-64

Service manual includes wiring diagrams.
Ranges/Stoves
Published by:
Frigidaire
1964 100 79mb $7.99
Add to download cart
Thumbnail Image of Download 1961 Constructa Automatic Washer Brochure
Here is a German language brochure from Constructa showing off their 1961 line of front-loading automatic washers. Models include:

K3, K3FS, K4, K4FS, K5, K6, T5
Automatic Washers
Published by:
Constructa
1961 24 45mb $5.99

Review Selections & Checkout          --          Continue Browsing the Library

For license and copyright information related to these materials please click here.

Please note that all publications presented here at Automatic Ephemera are on average between 35 and 85 years old. This information is presented as a educational/historical reference on vintage products of the past. Any trademarks or brand names appearing on this site are for nominative use to accurately describe the content contained in these publications. The associated trademarks are the sole property of their registered owners as there is no affiliation between Automatic Ephemera and these companies. No connection to or endorsement by the trademark owners is to be construed.