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Laundry Equipment Electric Motor Service Manual


Published by Westinghouse in 1970-- From the first page: The motor service manual has been prepared by Westinghouse Laundry Service with a threefold purpose. First - to explain the motor thoroughly so you will better understand its operation. Second - to show you how to use this information to diagnose motor failures and third, to make use of the diagnosis by repairing the inoperative motor rather than replacing it.

Studies indicate that nearly 70% of all laundry equipment fractional HP motor failures can be repaired (and put back into service in the appliance) on the first call to the customers home. These same studies show that, more often than not, the inoperative motor is replaced rather than repaired and that it requires more than one call to perform the job.

This book is not intended to be a one volume course on all fractional horsepower electric motors. Its intent is to help you to better perform your job as it applies to laundry equipment drive, pump and fan motors. Failures that occur on laundry equipment motors and which can economically and profitably be repaired are such parts as terminal boards, end bells, switches, thermoguard and capacitors (when they are used). There are also a number of adjustments that can be made to get the motor back into operation.


Sections Include:
INDUCTION MOTOR DESCRIPTION
TESTING PROCEDURES
PARTS REPLACEMENT
INTERNAL MOTOR WIRING DIAGRAMS
MOTOR CHARTS
ORIGINAL PRODUCTION MOTOR NUMBERS vs REPLACEMENT MOTOR NUMBERS

Number of Pages: 28
File Size: 18mb
Download Fee: $4.99

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Here is an automated summary of some of the text contained in:
Laundry Equipment Electric Motor Service Manual
Published in 1970

Important: Please note the summary text below was created by electronically reading the scanned images with optical character recognition software (ocr). OCR technolgoy is not yet perfected and you might see some spelling and formatting errors in the preview text below. These errors are not actually in the final product, the download file you will receive is a pure clean high-resolution scan of the original document, containing all text, graphics and photos exactly as originally printed.
Page 1:

Westinghouse Laundry Equipment Electric Motor Service Manual for split phase and capacitor start electric motors




Page 2:

Index

Page

INDUCTION MOTOR DESCRIPTION

Split Phase Motor ............................................................ 1

Capacitor Start Motor ........................................................ 2

HOW THE INDUCTION MOTOR OPERATES

(both split-phase & capacitor start covered) ........................................ 3

Capacitor Start Motor ........................................................ 5

Capacitor .................................................................... 5

Motor Illustrations .......................................................... 6

TESTING PROCEDURES

Capacitor Failures and Causes ................................................ 7

Capacitor Test ............................................................... 7

Motor Tests and Checks ....................................................... 8

Motor Test Charts ............................................................ 9, 10

PARTS REPLACEMENT

End Bells .................................................................... 11

Start Switch ................................................................. 11

Start Switch, Mounted on End Bell ............................................ 13

Thermoguard .................................................................. 14

Centrifugal Switch (using Robinair Tool kit #14148) ..................... 15 thru 19

Centrifugal Switch and Thermoguard Replacement Chart ......................... 17

Q-81863 Motor Disassembly .................................................... 13

INTERNAL MOTOR WIRING DIAGRAMS ................................................. 19 thru 23

MOTOR CHART

Original Production Motor Number vs. Replacement motor number

Dryers ....................................................................... 24

Automatic Washers and Drycleaners.................................Inside Back Cover
Page 3:

Preface

The motor service manual has been prepared by Westinghouse Laundry Service with a threefold purpose. First - to explain the motor thoroughly so you will better understand its operation. Second - to show you how to use this information to diagnose motor failures and third, to make use of the diagnosis by repairing the inoperative motor rather than replacing it.

Studies indicate that nearly 70% of all laundry equipment fractional HP motor failures can be repaired (and put back into service in the appliance) on the first call to the customers home. These same studies show that, more often than not, the inoperative motor is replaced rather than repaired and that it requires more than one call to perform the job.

This book is not intended to be a one volumn course on all fractional horsepower electric motors. Its intent is to help you to better perform your job as it applies to laundry equipment drive, pump and fan motors. Failures that occur on laundry equipment motors and which can economically and profitably be repaired are such parts as terminal boards, end bells, switches, thermoguard and capacitors (when they are used). There are also a number of adjustments that can be made to get the motor back into operation.

Only by making every correction or adjustment necessary on the appliance on_ the first cal I can you hold down your customer's service expense, improve your customer relations and make them long-time friends of your business.

Electric Induction Motor Description

WHAT IS AN ELECTRIC MOTOR?

A machine that changes electrical energy into mechanical energy to perform certain work loads.

TYPE OF ELECTRIC MOTORS

There are many different types of fractional horsepower motors (less than one horsepower). However we are primarily interested in the motors used on Laundry Equipment. The induction motor split-phase start, used on dryers, and the induction motor-capacitor-start, used on washing machines.

SPLIT PHASE MOTOR (Dryer)

The split phase motor has a main or running winding, and a separate starting winding. The starting winding is disconnected when running speed is reached by means of a centrifugal starting switch. The split phase motor has little starting torque and draws considerable starting current.

Fig. 1 Split Phase Motor

1
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CAPACITOR-START MOTOR (Automatic Washer)

This type motor has a running winding of heavy wire, and a starting winding of lighter wire in series with a high capacity electrolytic capacitor. A suitable switch, (in this case a centrifugal switch) disconnects the capacitor and starting winding when the motor reaches running speed. The capacitor start motor then runs as a single phase motor. Very high starting torque is characteristic of this type motor, however relatively little starting current is required. It has no advantage over the split phase motor after it reaches running speed since they are practically identical after the starting winding has been disconnected.

line capacitor

start switch

start winding

Fig. 2 Capacitor Start Motor

An Induction Motor - What it is and how it operates

(Both Split-Phase & Capacitor Start Motors)

The induction motor can be regarded as two rotating electromagnets - one trying to keep up with the other. An electromagnet has a core of magnetizable substance, as soft iron, which is temporarily magnetized by the passage of an electric current thru a coil of wire surrounding it, but looses its magnetism when the current stops.

In the induction motor, one of the electromagnets has no visible source of this current.

This electromagnet obtains its current from the other electromagnet thru a process known as "induction" therefore the motor is called an "Induction Motor".

In order to understand induction motors, let's review a few simple facts about magnets.

We know that unlike poles attract and like poles repel, as illustrated in Fig. 3.

BAR MAGNETS

N

S

N

unlike poles attract

N

S

S

N

like poles repel

Fig. 3

2
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Now let's take three bar magnets and attach a shaft to the center of one in such a fashion that it is free to rotate. Then place one bar magnet on top and one below the magnet that is free to turn. See Fig. 4.

Since magnetism can also be produced by electricity, we will replace the bar magnets with electromagnets. As we have stated before, an electromagnet needs a current flowing thru a wire wrapped around its iron core in order to produce magnetism (Fig. 5).

Fig. 6

3
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Reversing AC current reverses the magnetic polarity and causes magnet to rotate on shaft.

60 cycle alternating current rises and falls a total of 60 times a second. Points "a", "c", "e" and "g" represent instants when the current is zero. From "a", the current is seen to start at zero, increase to a maximum value at "b", and decrease again to zero at "c", the current then becomes negative, which signifies that the current reverses its direction of flow in the circuit. Flowing in this opposite direction, the current again builds up to a maximum value at "d" and decreases to zero again at "e", completing one cycle.

The voltages and currents reverse 60 times a second, changing in value and polarity.

Since there are no connections to the rotor winding, there is no way to apply a voltage to provide a reaction force to start the rotor in motion. The rotor does have a winding in the form of heavy bars in slots with short circuiting rings at each end. This is called a squirrel-cage rotor because of the resemblance of the current-carrying conductors and end rings to the cylindrical cages originally made to exercise squirrels. By induction, the AC in the stator winding induces current in the rotor winding.

Fig. 7

Fig. 8

4
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Although fairly large currents flow in these shorted loop windings there is no stationary torque. However, the motor will run in either direction in which it is started. As previously noted, this motor has a separate starting winding added to the stator, magnetically displaced from, and connected in parallel, with the main winding. The starting winding usually is wound from small size copper wire and is spaced 90 electrical degrees from the main winding. The center of each pole group of the auxiliary winding is spaced half-way between the centers of two pole groups of the main winding or phases. (See Fig. 9).

Fig. 9

By using a small size copper wire for the starting winding, we can obtain a resistance which will decrease the current in this phase. As previously stated, the two windings (main and start) are spaced 90 electrical degrees apart and connected in parallel and the start winding has more resistance than the main winding; its magnetism comes to full value just a little after the main coil (or magnets) comes to full value, producing a rotating field, causing the rotor to develop torque. The motor starts and runs, because the rotor tries to follow the revolving magnetic field. After the motor has come up to approximately 75 to 80 percent of its running speed, depending on the frequency and applica-

tion, we must have a means to cut the starting winding from the circuit, in this case a centrif-ugally operated switch.

The starting switch prevents the motor from drawing excessive watts from the line and burning up the starting winding when operating at normal running speeds, as it would do with the starting winding in the circuit.

CAPACITOR-START MOTOR

The split-phase motor could be made into a capacitor-start motor by adding a capacitor in series with the start winding. However, this does not mean that a motor designed for capacitor-start is the same as a split-phase motor with a capacitor added. In the capacitor-start motor, the windings are specially designed and proportioned, although both types of motors have two electrically distinct windings, generally located 90 electrical degrees apart, and the main or run winding is wound with a larger size wire and with fewer turns than the start winding. However, the start winding of a capacitor-start motor usually contains more copper than the start winding of a split-phase motor of the same rating. The line current of the capacitor-start motor is only two-thirds the line current of corresponding split-phase motor, yet this motor develops more than twice the starting torque. The split-phase motor has resistance deliberately built into the start winding so that the starting phase lags the running phase. The capacitor-start motor has a capacitor in series with the start winding (phase) which causes it to lead the main-phase voltage. The purpose of a capacitor is to lower the starting current of the motor and increase its starting torque.

CAPACITOR

A motor starting capacitor is an electrochemical device used mainly for phase shifting in connection with the starting of an electrical motor. The capacitor consists of a rolled cartridge comprising of two aluminum electrodes separated by layers of paper, all of which are impregnated in a conducting electrolyte and housed in an aluminum or plastic container.

5
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Five Typical Laundry Equipment Motors

DRYER - 1/6 HP Double Shaft Motor TUMBLER WASHER-1/3 HP Single Shaft Motor

1/3 HP Single Phase Pump & Fan Motor Commercial WASHER

1/2 HP Single Phase, Double Shaft, Drive & Pump Motor TOP LOADING WASHER

1/3 HP Single Phase Drive Motor COMMERCIAL TOP LOADER

1/3 HP Reversible Drive Motor COMMERCIAL WASHER

Mounting Ring Rear End Bell

Oil Slinger

Stator

PLAM Motor Breakdown

Nylon Spacer Washers

-

Rotor

Dust Cap

Terminal Board and Stationary Switch

Front End Bell

6
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Testing Procedures

CAPACITOR FAILURES AND THEIR CAUSES

Capacitor failures are usually caused by one or more of the following reasons: Excessive voltage, excessive cycling, excessive temperature and internal corrosion.

INTERNAL CORROSION is usually caused by impurities present during the assembly or processing of the capacitor or a broken or defective seal.

EXCESSIVE VOLTAGE usually caused by high line condition, or a chattering or improperly adjusted starting switch and possibly a defective winding.

The starting switch must be positive in action; it must not flutter. It is possible to get as high as double voltage impressed on the capacitor by a fluttering switch. This happens if the switch is fluttering and that it interrupts the circuit at such

a time as to leave the capacitor fully charged, then if the switch happens to close when the voltage is of the opposite polarity, double voltage will be impressed momentarily upon the capacitor.

EXCESSIVE CYCLING caused by low voltage or motor overload, causes motor to run in the starting position for a longer period than is recommended. With voltage applied to the capacitor for too long a period the extra heat accumulated will dry out the moisture content of the electrolyte, char the paper and the capacitor will cease_ to function. This capacitor will test open since no electrolytic action can take place without moisture.

EXCESSIVE TEMPERATURE can be caused by too frequent or too long a starting cycle or excessive voltage.

CAPACITOR TEST

The following is a simple capacitor test to determine if the motor capacitor is Good, Open or Shorted.

Make up a test cord as shown in Figure 10 and with the cord plugged into an outlet:

(a) Turn S.P.D.T. switch to "AC" position.

1. If lamp does not light capacitor is Open Circuited.

2. If lam p lights -

(b) Turn S.P.D.T. switch to "DC" position.

1. If lamp does not light, capacitor is OK.

2. If lamp lights, capacitor is Shorted.

CAUTION

Discharge Capacitor After The Test is Complete. . . .

Discharge by Placing A Screwdriver or Other Metal Object Across the Capacitor Terminal s.

Fig. 10

7
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MOTOR TESTS AND CHECKS MOTOR FAILS TO START -

1. Check for voltage and frequency to the motor and that the voltage is within 10 percent of the voltage rating on the motor name plate. Voltage test should be made during the start test. This is especially important if the motor is attached to a machine.

2. Check with a test light across the terminals of the motor. A voltmeter gives a more positive analysis of the voltage.

3. Check the capacitor (if used on the motor) by temporary replacement or check the removed capacitor as outlined on page 7.

4. Check all connections and terminals at the terminal board to be sure they are tight and that they hav.e not been interchanged. Examine the switch and molded ring for any foreign material that could cause the ring to stick. Any foreign material in evidence should be cleaned off with a fireproof solvent, such as perchlorethylene or trichlorethylene.

Check for a bent or broken counter weight spring on the rotary switch. If such is found, the complete rotary switch must be replaced or new motor installed.

5. Check the starting switch to be sure it is operating mechanically as well as electrically. Examine the contacts to be sure they have the proper clearance and that the contact surfaces are clean.

6. Remove the belts from the motor. The motor shaft should turn freely; if not, remove the motor, disassemble and examine the bearings and shaft.

7. If a motor connected to the line will not start but will run normally when started by hand (by twisting the shaft), the trouble is in the starting winding or starting circuit. Check also for excessive end-play which can affect operation of the starting switch.

8. Check the shaft for end-play. Excessive end-play causes noise. End play should be .005 to .032.

9. Motor fails to Start Intermittently (After Use and Up to Operating Temp).

a. This may be due to a low calibrated thermoguard and is evident after the motor has come up to normal operating temperature. (See also para. 8, page 9) A thermoguard test can be made by locking the rotor with a belt and turning on the power. This test should be repeated. The thermoguard should trip in not less than a specified number of seconds. This information for a particular motor is published in the Laundry service manual for that particular motor and machine application. The timing can vary from 4 seconds to three minutes (cold motor) depending upon the motor phase and winding. (Time will vary with winding temperature). See page 9.

b. As a rule of thumb, if the motor, under locked rotor conditions, shows any indication of overheating before the thermoguard trips, the thermoguard is inoperative and should be replaced. Make a full load amperage test.

c. See Parts Replacement Section for information regarding changing thermoguards. Some Laundromat motors (see chart) do not require thermoguards since motor protection is accomplished by a thermal protector in the timer.

NOISY MOTOR -

1. Excessive end-play in the motor will cause noisy operation and will be accentuated if the belts are misaligned. Correct the end-play by adding nylon (see Parts List) washers to the shaft between rotor and end bell and by realigning the belts.

2. Loose set screw in motor pulley will allow the pulley to shift on the shaft. This will cause a knocking sound as well as cause scoring of the shaft. Remove the pulley, clean the shaft with a fine tooth file and crocus cloth and replace the pulley in proper alignment on the shaft. Tighten the set screw securely.

3. Worn bearings cause noise. Check the bearings in the end-bell for wear. Examine for possible damage due to water or other liquids which may have filtered through the vent openings in the motor. Correct the source of contamination.
Page 11:

4. Loose motor mounting clamps are another source of noise.

5. Worn rubber end rings or rings that have been softened from oil or other rubber solvent are a source of noise. Replace if necessary.

6. A split ring is used on the rubber motor mount to help support the motor when the motor clamp is put in place. The "split" of the ring should be "up" when the clamp is put in place. This will prevent the ring from overlapping at the ends with the result of noise.

7. Noise or hum usually quite pronounced, may be traced to the wrong motor application for the frequency furnished in the power line. This will be noticeable either way; i.e. whether a 50 cycle motor is being used on 60 cycle or a 60 cycle motor is used on 50 cycle. (Some motors are manufactured to operate on either.)

8. Wrong voltage to the motor, such as applying 220 Volts to a 120 Volt motor will not only cause excessive noise but will cause excessive sparking at the starting switch and short life to the motor.

VIBRATION -

1. Vibration in Dryer believed to be in the motor, most often may be traced to the blower fan when it is mounted on the motor shaft. Check the fan for unbalance. Blades may be cracked or missing, etc. Check for wads of lint in blower fin.

2. Uneven belts or those badly worn in spots can cause vibration.

3. Pulleys that are bent or damaged can cause vibration.

4. If vibration is traced to the motor, disassemble and examine the rotor fan which may be bent or damaged.

5. The motor centrifugal weight or weights may have become misplaced or out of line due to a broken or bent centrifugal weight spring. Examine parts carefully. Do not attempt to realign these parts. Replace the centrifugal weight spring and switch assembly as an assembly.

OPERATING TEMPERATURE

Motors operating at full load characteristically run "hot", i.e.-hot to the touch. Usually there will be a marking on the name plate indicating the degree of centigrade rise above the ambient or room temperature.

As an example: A motor marked with a 50° Centigrade rise (122°F.) may operate at approximately 190°F. in normal room temperature of 70°F. (70° + 122°). To the touch of the hand this is HOT but within the normal operating limits. The motor insulation and windings have been designed to operate up to this temperature. A motor marked for a 70° temp rise may operate at 228°F (158°F plus 70°F = 228°F.) Do not condemn a motor because of temperature unless it exceeds the rating. A motor with a built-in thermoguard or one properly fused will be adequately protected.

MOTOR TEST CHARTS

MOTOR RUNS - BUT IS NOISY

Loose Bearings

Check Bearings

End-play


Replace End Bell if Bearing Worn

Check Nylon Spacers for End P lay

Add or Replace as. Necessary___

Wrong Voltage or Frequency___

To

Motor

Rewire to Motor

Wrong

Motor

Check Rating on Motor Nameplate

Motor Sparks

Wrong Voltage to Motor

Start

Switch

Clean

and/or

Adjust

Contacts

If Inoperative-Replace Motor Terminal Board

Centrifugal

Switch

Check Switch Weight s and Spring

If Broken or Distorted Replace Switch

Start

Switch

Check Mech. & Electrical Operation

If Inoperative - Replace Motor Terminal Board

9
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Flow charts for troubleshooting

********

10
Page 13:

Parts Replacement

MOTOR END BELL

1. Remove any burrs from pulley shaft.

2. Mark end bells and motor frame on both ends of motor for proper alignment.

3. Remove the four thru bolts.

4. Bump shaft end of motor lightly against a

wooden or padded surface to loosen end bell. Remove end bell.

5. Tap end of rotor lightly and remove other end bell and rotor. Care should be taken to see that the nylon washers at both ends of the shaft remain in position. If washers are worn, replace as needed.

6. If both end bells are replaced or motor was

not marked for assembly of the end bells,

alignment of the bearings must be so oil slots in inside surface of end bell bearings are in opposite alignment. (With the terminal board end bell at three (3) o'clock, the drive end bell notch must be at nine (9) o'clock. See Fig. 11.

NOTE: There is an oil slinger washer in the drive end bell which should be centered over the bearing before assembling to rotor.

NOTE: Some motors have spring washers on rotor shaft. Note 'position when motor is disassembled so proper replacement can be made.

MOTOR STARTING SWITCHES Switch Mounted On Motor Frame

Remove any burrs from pulley shaft.

Mark the motor end bells and motor frame on both ends of motor for proper assembly alignment.

Remove the four thru bolts.

Bump shaft end of motor lightly against a wooden or padded surface to loosen end bell. Remove end bell.

Tap end of rotor lightly and remove other end bell and rotor.

Rest the motor frame on end with terminal board up.

Remove the two terminal board mounting screws.

Remove flag connectors from terminals of old switch and install on new switch in same manner and location.

Lay a straight edge across the motor frame and with a scale, measure down from the straight edge to the spring tip. This dimension must be between and 35/64". To

Fig. 11

INDICATES SIDE OPPOSITE LOCATION OF BEARING "WINDOW". PULL OF BELT MUST BE AWAY FROM BEARING WINDOW OR TOWARD INDENT.

11
Page 14:

obtain proper tip height, bend stop up or down, whichever is required. See Fig. 12.

10. Use a feeler gage to measure the clearance between the starting contacts. If not within the limits of .025" to .040", bend the stationary contact accordingly.

11. If the motor is equipped with auxiliary con-

tacts, measure for adjustment in the same manner but use tip dimensions .450/.475 (Approx. 29/64" - 31/64") and .025/.040 (Approx. 1/32" - 3/64") for the contact clearance.

12. Reassemble the motor. Make sure there is one 1/32" (.031) washer on each end of the rotor shaft.

Fig. 12

PLAM washer motor with terminal board mounted on motor frame

STATIONARY CONTACT ARM

CONTACT CLEARANCE .025 to .040

Fig. 13

PLAM Dryer motor Note-Auxiliary contacts carry heater load

AUXILIARY

CONTACTS

SPRING TIP

STATIONARY CONTACT ARM

STARTING CONTACTS

HEATER LOAD CONTACT

TERMINAL BOARD ASSEMBLY

Fig. 14

PLAM Drycleaner motor Note - Auxiliary contacts carry heater load

12
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SWITCH AND TERMINAL BOARD Mounted On Front End Bell

The motor starting switch with auxiliary starting contacts on later type motors is mounted on the front end bell. See Fig. 15. Disassembly

of the motor is performed in the same manner as previously described. No adjustment of this starting switch should be necessary. If it has become bent or otherwise distorted, it must be replaced. Twenty thousandths inch clearance should be checked between contacts before end bell is replaced.

ROTOR

1. Remove any burrs from pulley shaft.

2. Mark the motor end bells and motor frame on both ends of motor for proper assembly alignment.

3. Remove the four thru bolts.

4. Bump shaft end of motor lightly against a

wooden or padded surface to loosen end bell. Remove end bell.

5. Tap end of rotor lightly and remove other end bell and rotor.

6. Remove nylon spacer washers from each end of shaft and examine, replace if worn.

7. Reassemble motor and check end play. This

Fig. 15 should be from .005 to .032.

Q-81863 MOTOR (style number stamped on motor nameplate)

Disassembly of this motor is somewhat different

from the rest of the motors covered in this manual

therefore it is being covered separately here.

DISASSEMBLY OF Q-81863 MOTOR

1. Mark the end bells for easier replacement.

2. Remove the four through bolts.

3. Remove the bearing dust cap with an awl or small screwdriver by prying from place. This cap may be distorted by removal so a new one should be on hand, for replacement.

4. Remove the snap ring from the rotor shaft with a pair of truarc, or similar pliers.

5. Remove the nylon washers.

6. Pull the end bell far enough away from the stator to disconnect the motor lead wires.

7. Remove the end bell.

8. Remove the rotor from the stator by pulling it out the side opposite from the stator lead wires.

9. Remove the two screws that mount the capacitor cover and lift cover from stator.

10. Remove the capacitor from the cover by prying from place.

Fig. 15A

11. Remove the leads from the capacitor by unsoldering from the capacitor.

12. Replace the motor parts in the reverse order. Be sure to place the nylon washers in their proper place with two inside and two outside the end bell. Maximum end play is .010 on this motor.

ROTOR-SHAFT

13
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REPLACING THERMOGUARD® MOTOR EQUIPMENT MOTORS

* Power Line Appliance Motors

This replacement procedure should be performed in the shop

1. Mark the motor end bells to facilitate proper alignment of the parts when they are replaced on the stator. Remove the thru bolts.

2. Rap the rotor shaft ends sharply with a lead or rawhide mallet to loosen the end bells from the stator. If neither mallet i^ available bump the rotor shaft end against the wooden or padded bench.

3. Remove the end bells and rotor and set them aside.

4. Place the stator in an oven with regulated temperature of from 150° to 170°F. and allow the stator to stabilize at that temperature to soften the varnish around the Thermoguard to be removed. This will take about twenty minutes or more.

CAUTION: DO NOT HEAT ABOVE 300°F.

Fig. 16

5. With the varnish softened, remove the tie or the Micarta wedge from the Thermoguard and carefully pry the Thermoguard from the windings. Fig. 17.

6. Cut the lead Close to the Thermoguard to leave sufficient lead length to install the new Thermoguard, motor protector.

7. Splice the cut lead to the new Thermoguard lead. The orange Thermoguard lead should go to the motor winding.

PROTECTOR IN "PLAM"* LAUNDRY

Fig. 17

8. Solder or weld the splice and cover it with at least three layers of tape such as Mylar or Permacel. Fig. 18.

CAUTION: Do not use plastic electrician's tape since it may melt at stator operating temperatures.

9. Place the flat side (not stepped side) of the new Thermoguard in a puddle of liquid varnish in the same spot from which the inoperative Thermoguard was removed.

10. Tie the Thermoguard to the winding with cord and brush-coat the entire repair with varnish. Fig. 19. Use Westinghouse #M-6372-2 varnish, available in 1 oz. bottles, style Q-115458. The stator does not need to be baked. The varnish will dry in fifteen or twenty minutes.

NOTE MARKS

11. Reassemble the motor and make any contact adjustments as outlined.

NOTE: On Thermoguards not equipped with a spade connector for the terminal board connection, a flag connector will have to be soldered in place.

Fig. 18

14
Page 17:

Fig. 19

REPLACING CENTRIFUGAL SWITCH IN "PLAM"* LAUNDRY EQUIPMENT MOTORS

* Power Line Appliance Motors

1. Scribe-mark both end-bells with respect to their position on the stator housing. This is to assure proper replacement.

2. Remove the four nuts and through bolts that mount the end bells to the housing.

3. Lightly bump the rotor shaft (on the terminal board end of the motor) with a lead or brass mallet, or bump the shaft against a wooden surface to jar opposite end bell from motor.

Fig. 21

This replacement procedure must be performed in the shop using -

ROBINAIR TOOL KIT #14148

Fig. 22

4. Pull rotor and end-bell off as an assembly.

Fig. 23

15
Page 18:

5. Remove the end-bell from the rotor and set aside. Also, remove from the shaft, the nylon end-play spacers from each side of rotor so they will be available for replacement.

6. Remove the molded collar from centrifugal switch by twisting it clockwise.

7. Hold rotor in a vise or other suitable fixture, but tighten only enough to hold, not distort.

8. Install puller tool over centrifugal switch end of shaft and slide it down over the sleeve.

NOTE: Be sure puller screw is backed out sufficiently so puller tube will extend in beyond sleeve.

X" WASHER

Fig. 25

distort the mechanism so no attempt should be made to reuse it.

13. Place the new centrifugal mechanism and sleeve on the rotor shaft.

NOTE: The centrifugal mechanism unit must be placed so the weights will align in the openings that have been provided on the rotor by eliminating fins-weights face toward rotor.

Fig. 24

9. Slide C-shaped washer in puller slot so it will engage the sleeve when the puller screw is tightened.

10. Turn puller screw clockwise with a %" Allen Wrench while holding the puller with a 3/4" end wrench on the "Flats." This will pull the sleeve off of the rotor shaft.

11. To remove the centrifugal switch, insert the U-shaped rod tool assembly (with alignment piece) through two of the round openings in the rotor opposite to the end holding the centrifugal mechanism. Choose two openings that will allow tool to bottom against the centrifugal plate without striking the weights.

12. Strike the tool sharply with a hammer to remove the centrifugal mechanism. This will

16
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14. Force the new mechanism and sleeve to proper dimensional location on shaft by using the proper installation tool* and an arbor press. A hammer can be used in place of an arbor press if extreme care is exercised. However, hammering is not recommended.

* Consult chart for proper tool to use.

NOTE - 1: The molded collar should be on the mechanism when it is pressed into place since

the installation tool has been designed for installation of the sleeve and centrifugal switch mechanism with the molded collar in place.

NOTE - 2: Be sure rotor is properly supported to avoid bending the fins and to be sure the sleeve and switch are pressed on to the shaft to the proper dimension. Support should be on the bottom end of the shaft rather than against the aluminum fins.

TERMINAL

BOARD

ROTOR

SPRING

WASHER

WASHERS

CENTRIFUGAL

SWITCH

DUST

MOTOR

MOUNT

END BELL

STATOR

THRU BOLTS

DUST CAP

WASHER

TYPICAL MOTOR CONSTRUCTION

Fig. 27

END

BELL ROTOR

THRU BOLTS

TYPICAL MOTOR CONSTRUCTION

Fig. 28

STATOR

TYPE

THERMOSTAT

END BELL

WASHER

DUST

CAP

17
Page 20:

CENTRIFUGAL SWITCHES, TOOLS AND THERMOGUARD® MOTOR PROTECTOR CHART WESTINGHOUSE POWER LINE APPLIANCE MOTORS

MOTOR ROTARY SWITCH CENTRIFUGAL SWITCH PULLER CENTRIFUGAL SWITCH INSTALLATION TOOL SPACER PULLER THERMOGUARD PRODUCT
Q-81803
Q-81804
Q-81805
Q-81807
Q-81811
Q-81813
Q-81814
Q-81815
Q-81821
Q-81822
Q-81823
Q-81824
Q-81827
Q-81829
Q-81831
Q-81832
Q-81854
Q-81855
Q-81856
Q-81859
Q-81863
Q-81871
Q-81872
Q-81881
Q-81883
Q-81891
Q-92111
Q-92112
Q-92113
Q-92114
Q-121801
Q-121802
Q-121803
Q-121821
Q-137541
Q-137542

*Replacement Tool not yet available.
Page 21:

Motor internal Wiring Diagrams for Laundry Equipment

DRYER MOTORS

Q-81803 or Q-81804 appears on motor nameplate

Q-81807

appears on motor nameplate

Q-81813 or Q-137541 or Q-81815 or Q-137542

appears on motor nameplate

Q-81805

appears on motor nameplate

Q-81811 or Q-81814 appears on motor nameplate

Q-81831

appears on nameplate

19
Page 22:

Motor Internal Wiring Diagrams for Laundry Equipment

AUTOMATIC WASHER MOTORS

Internal wiring for Q-81821 & Q-81827 - Styles appear on motor nameplates

Internal wiring for Q-81822, Q-81823, Q-81829 & Q-81859 motors -

Styles appear on motor nameplates

Internal wiring for Q-81824 motor -Style appears on motor nameplate

Internal wiring for - Q-81854 motor -Style appears on motor nameplate

Internal wiring for Q-81855 & Q-81891 Styles appear on motor nameplates

Internal wiring for Q-81856 motor -Style appears on motor nameplate
Page 23:

EXTERNAL WRING OF MOTOR CONNECTOR

TAN TR. fol
BROWN
WHITE o[
Ej

Internal wiring for Q-121801 motor Style appears on motor nameplate * (Note wiring for motor-harness plug)

Internal wiring for Q-121802 motor Style appears on motor nameplate * (Note wiring for motor-harness plug)

Internal Wiring for Q-81871 Motor

Style Number appears on motor nameplate

(Note wiring for motor-harness plug)

Internal Wiring for Q-81872 Motor Style Number appears on motor nameplate (Note wiring for motor-harness plug)

â– polarizing rib

WHIT c

motor yellow PIU9 viewed from rear or wire lead end of cap.



Plug viewed from rear or wire If ad end of cap.

Internal Wiring for Q-81881 Motor Style Number appears on motor nameplate (Note wiring for motor-harness plug)

Internal Wiring for Q-81883 Motor Style Number appears on motor nameplate (Note wiring for motor-harness plug)

EXTERNAL WRING Of MOTOR CONNECTOR

WHITE

21
Page 24:

AUTOMATIC WASHER MOTOR INTERNAL WIRING DRYCLEANER DRIVE MOTOR INTERNAL WIRING

Internal Wiring for Q-81863 Motor Style Numbers appear on motor nameplate

Internal Wiring for Q-81832 Motor Style Numbers appear on motor nameplate

Internal Wiring for Q-92114 Motor Style Numbers appear on motor nameplate

Internal Wiring for Q-92113 Motor Style Numbers appear on motor nameplate
Page 25:


Internal Wiring for Q-92112 Motor

Style Numbers appear on motor nameplate.

Internal Wiring for Q-121803 motor Style Numbers appear on motor nameplate.

Internal Wiring for Q-92111 Motor

Style Numbers appear on motor nameplate.

Internal Wiring for Q-121821 Motor Style Numbers appear on motor nameplate

23
Page 26:

Westinghouse

LAUNDRY EQUIPMENT MOTOR APPLICATION CHARTS

It is more economical to repair motors rather than replace them. To order motor repair parts see original motor name plate for motor style number then refer to Renewal Parts Data No. 289-512 for parts data.

DRYERS

REPLACEMENT
PRODUCTION MOTOR
DRYER MODEL MOTOR STYLE STYLE
D-l, D-3, D-3A

DH-3, DH-3B, DH-3K
DH-4, DH-4B
DH-3L, D-127, D-127B
DH-5, DH-6, DH-7
D-125, D-125B
AD-1, AD-2
D-5, D-5A
D-6, D-6M
D-6, DS-7
D-6MA
DS-7, DS-8
DS-8, D-8
DS-8SP, D-8M, D-9, D-100,,D-100M,
D-l 10, D-l 12, D-l 14, D-102, D-104
D-l 13, D-114K, D-l 15
D-1000, D-120
D-122, D-124, D-122W, ALDRY 10E, 10ET, 10G, 10GT
D-126, D-128
DAA30SW1, DBA30SW1, D-120M
DGA30SW1, ALD-1, 2; 3, 4
DAB-30, DBB-30, DCB-30, DEB-30, DGB-30, DKB-30,
DSC-25, D-125M, D-127M, DH-5M, DH-6M, DH-7M
DAC-30, DBC-30, DEC-30, DFC-30, DKC-30, DLC-30,
DTC-30, DGC-30, DJC-30, DCC-30, DBD-30, DCD-30,
DGD-30, DKD-30
DTF-100-1, DTF-200-1, 400-1, 550-1, 570-1,
DTF-578-1, 600-1, 670-1, 678-1, 700-1, 800-1,
DGF-100-1, 400-1, 570-1, 571-1, DTU-100-1, 800-1,
DGU-578-1, 600-1, 601-1, DGU-100-1, DGU-800-1
12E27S, 12ET27, 12G27S, 12GT27
DTF-100-2, 200-2, 400-2, 570-2, 600-2, 610-1,
DTF-578-2, 590-1, 620-1, 630-1, 670-2, 678-2,
DTF-680-1, 700-2, 750-1, 800-2, DTU-100-2. 800-2
DGF-80-1, 100-2, 400-2, 570-2, 571-2, 578-2, 701-1,
DGF-750-1, 630-1, 680-1, 590-1, 601-2, 800-2,
DGU-100-1, 100-2, 800-2
DTF-100-3, 680-2, DTU-100-3, DGU-100-3, DGF-100-3
DEH-250-1, 350-1, 450-1, 650-1, DEH-850-1
DGH-250-1, 350-1, 450-1, 650-1, DGH-850-1
DEH-10C-1, 10S-1, 10U-1, 505- 1, 515-1, 525-1. 550-1,
DGH-10C-1, 10S-1, 10U-1, 505-1, 515-1, 525-1, 550-1,
DEH-250 2, 350-2, 450-2, 650-2, 850-2,
DGH-250-2, 350-2, 450-2, 650-2, 850-2
DEH-505-2, 515-2, 525-2, 550-2
DGH-505-2, 515-2, 525-2, 550-2

* For 50 cycle application order Q-81815
Page 27:

WASHERS AND DRYCLEANERS

DOMESTIC WASHER MODEL PRODUCTION MOTOR STYLE REPLACEMENT MOTOR STYLES KIT STYLE TO BE ADDED
B-3 1215105 or 1177096 955036 Q-4667
Bl-3 1465034 955036 Q-4667
C-3, C1-3, CM-3, CM-4, CM1-4, L-4, LB-6, LB6M, L-8 1465028 955036
LC-8, LC-8M, L-8M, L-9, L-100, L-102 1467463 955036
LS-7, LS-8 1466644 1586204 Q-4667
LS-8SP, L-100M, L-102K, L-104, L-110, L-112 1468083 or 1468984 1586204
L-113, L-114, L-l 14C, L-115 1468083 or 1468984 1586204
L-IOOO, L-IOOOM, LAA-3 1825456 or Q-81822, Q-81859 1586223
L-120, L-120M, L-122, L-122W, L-124, L-126, L-128 1825358 or Q-81821 1586230
LBA-30SW1, LBA30SW2, LGA-30SW1, LAS-30SW1 1825358 or Q-81821 1586230
LBB-30SW1, LCB-30SW1, LGB-30SW1 1825358 or Q-81821 1586230
LAB-30SW2, LBB-30SW2, LCB-30SW2, LGB-30SW2 Q-81827 1586230
LEB-30SW1, LEB-30SW2, LKB-30SW1, LKB-30SW2 Q-81827 1586230
LAC, LCC, LGC, LKC, LJC, LLC, LFC, LED Q-81827 1586230
LBD, LCD, LGC, LKD Q-81855 1586230
LTF-lOO, 200, 400, 570, 578, 590, 600, Q-81891 Q-81891
670, 678, 700, 800 Q-81891 Q-81891
LTF.100-3, 200-3, 400-3, 570-3, 590-3, LTH-100, Q-121821 Q121821
600-3, 670-3, 678-3, 700-3, 800-3 450,550 Q-121821 Q-121821
H-l, H-IB, H-1P, H-2K 1467476 1586206
H-2, H-2B, H-2P, LH-3, LH-3B 1468058 1586207
LH-3K, LH-3BK, LH-4, LSC-25 1467476 or 1468983 1586206
LH-4B, LH-5, 6, 7, LVD-500, LVD-600 1467476 or 1468983 1586206
L-125, L-125K, L-127, L-127K 1468983 or Q-81824 1586206
WD-1, WD-2, WD-3, WD-3V, WD-5 1467509 1586233
CAB-32XW1, CAB-32CW1, CBB-32XW1 Q-81831 1586233
LUC-27, LUC-27-1 Q-92111 Q-92111
LTC-27-1 Q-921 12 Q-92112
LTC-27-2 Q-92114 Q-92114
LAF-200, 400, 570, 590, 600, 610, 620, 630, 640, 680 Q-121801 Q-121801
LAH-850, 650, 605, 615, 505, 515, 525, 550, 454, 450 Q-121801 Q-121801
LAF-670, 700, 750, 780, LAH-350, 250 Q-121802 Q-121802
COMMERCIAL WASHER AND DRYCLEANER MODEL
RL-l, RL-1A, RL-3, RC-3, RC-1A, RC-4, RCM-4 1465028, 1467463 or 1825044 955036
RC-5, RCM-5 1825701 1586231 Q-48048
RC-5, RCM-5, RC-6-, RCM-6, RC-7, RCM-7 Q-81823, Q-81829, Q-81856 1586231
RC-8, RCM-8, RA-8, RAM-8 Q-81823, Q-81829, Q-81856 1586231
ACM-27 Q-92111 Q-9211 1
ACM-27A Q-92113 Q-92113
ACM-1, BAR-115, BAU-115, BAM-115 Q-121803 Q-121803
LD-20, LDM-20, LDM-20A Q-81871 Q-120573
LD-20-3, LDM-20-3, LDM-20-3A Q-81872 Q-120574
LDM-16 Q-81863 Q-81863
LD-20, LDM-20 Series Pump Motor Q-81881 Q-120572
LD-20A, LDM-20A Series Pump Motor Q-81883 Q-81883
DC-20, DC-20A, DC-20B,
DCF-10, DCF-11, DCF-11 A Q-81832 1586232


Here are the 25 most recent documents added to the library...
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Thumbnail Image of Download 1960 Philco Automagic Washer Brochures
Here are some beautiful brochures for the 1960 line of Philco Automagic Washers. Illustrations and Specifications included.

Models shown: W-208, W-206, W-204, W-202 and W-200.

Please note the originals had some minor water damage on them so there are some water spots or slightly blurry spots. However these are still very readable and super fun to look at.
Automatic Washers
Published by:
Philco
1960 14 22mb $5.99
Introductory Price of $3.99


ends in:
1 day
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Thumbnail Image of Download 1959 Philco Duomatic Combination Washer-Dryer Brochure
Here is a wonderful brochure for the Philco's first 27" combination washer/dryer. Illustrations and Specs included for model: CE-794.


Combination Washer/Dryers
Published by:
Philco
1959 4 39mb $5.99
Introductory Price of $3.99


ends in:
1 day
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Thumbnail Image of Download 1960 Philco Automagic Dryer Brochures
Here are some beautiful brochures for the 1960 line of Philco Automagic Dryers. Illustrations and Specifications included.

Models shown: DE-608, DE-606, DE-604, DE-602 and DE-600.

Please note the originals had some minor water damage on them so there are some water spots or slightly blurry spots. However these are still very readable and super fun to look at.
Clothes Dryers
Published by:
Philco
1960 10 15mb $5.99
Introductory Price of $3.99


ends in:
1 day
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Thumbnail Image of Download Early Frigidaire Refrigerator Service Manual Vol-1 1925 to 1936
This is a three volume comprehensive service manual for Frigidaire Refrigerators from the 1920's thru 1951. The set is a fascinating historical look at early Frigidaire home refrigeration.

Volume 1 Covers:
Refrigerators prior to 1933 (Low Side Float System),

1933 to 1936 Reciprocating Models (High Side Float System),

1933 to 1936 Rotary Models (Restrictor System)

Manual contains mechanical and refrigeration theory and primer, model images and specifications, wiring diagrams, troubleshooting and full servicing information.

VOLUME 2 is located here for the 1937-1942.
VOLUME 3 is located here for the post-war models.

Models mentioned in Volume 1:
P-4, AP-5, AP-6, AP-7-1, AP-7-2, AP-9, AP-12, AP-18, B-5, B-5-2, B-9, B-15, D-4, D-5, D-6, D-7-2, D-9, D-12, L-5, LP-5, M-5, M-5-2, M-7, M-9, M-12, M-15, MP-5, MP-7, MP-9, MP-12, MP-15, P-9, P-15, PT-5, T-5, TP-5, V-5, EE-5, VP-5, I, G-3, G-4, GR-4, G-5, G-6, MC-9, MC-12, W-3, W-4, W-5, W-6, W-8, W-10, W-12, W-18, WP-7, WP-8, WP-10, WP-13, WA-3, WPA-3, AHM-3330, AHM-4830, AHM-4840, AHM-5340, AHM-5750, ML-37, ML-48, ML-64, ML-4837, ML-4848, ML-5764, ML-4, ML-5, ML-6, ML-4840, ML-4850, ML-5760, S-4, S-5, S-6, WP-4, WP-5, WP-6, WP-18, SD-4, SD-6, S-4840, S-4850, S-5760, SL-43, SL-63, SL-73.
Refrigerators/Freezers
Published by:
Frigidaire
1951 184 177mb $8.99
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Thumbnail Image of Download Early Frigidaire Refrigerator Service Manual Vol-2 1937 to 1942
This is a three volume comprehensive service manual for Frigidaire Refrigerators from the 1920's thru 1951. The set is a fascinating historical look at early Frigidaire home refrigeration.

Volume 2 Covers:
Rotary Compressor Analysis
Miscellanous and Supplimentary Information
Full descriptions of 1937, 1938, 1939, 1940, 1941 and 1942 model refrigerators.

Manual contains mechanical and refrigeration theory and primer, model images and specifications, wiring diagrams, troubleshooting and full servicing information.

VOLUME 1 is located here for the earliest models.
VOLUME 3 is located here for the post-war models.

Models mentioned in Volume 2:
1937 Refrigerators:
Dulux Finished Cabinets
D 3-37 Master 4-37
DRS 5-37 Master 5-37
DRS 6-37 Master 6-37
DRS 7-37 Master 7-37
Master 8-37
Porcelain Finished Cabinets
DeLuxe 5-37 DeLuxe 8-37
DeLuxe 6-37 Imperial '37
DeLuxe 7-37

1938 Refrigerators:
Dulux Finished Refrigerators
D3
TD3
Special S-38
Special 6-38
Special 7-38
Master 4-38
Master S-38
Master 6-38
Master 7-38
Master 8-38
Porcelain Finished Refrigerators
DeLuxe S-38 Imperial
DeLuxe 6-38
DeLuxe 7-38 WP-19
DeLuxe 8-38

1939 Refrigerators:
DA Model Refrigerators:
TDA-3
DA-3
DA-4
Super Value 6-39.
Special Model Refrigerators:
Special 5-39
Special 6-39
Master Model Refrigerators :
Master 4-39
Master 5-39
Master 6-39
Master 8-39
Cold-Wall Model Refrigerators:
Cold-Wall 6-39
(Dulux Exterior)
Cold-Wall8-39
(Dulux Exterior)
Cold-Wall5-39
(Porcelain Exterior}
Cold-Wall 6-39
(Porcelain Exterior)
Cold-Wall8-39
(Porcelain Exterior)
Cold-Wall Imperial and WP-19.

1940 Refrigerators:
Table Top Model:
TDB-3
Super Value Refrigerators:
sv 3
SV4
sv 6-40
sv 8-40
Master Refrigerators:
M 5-40
M 6-40
DeLuxe Refrigerators:
D 5-40
D 6-40
Cold-Wall Master Refrigerators:
CWM 5-40
CWM 6-40
Cold-Wall DeLuxe Refrigerators:
CWD 6-40
CWD 8-40
Cold-Wall Imperial Refrigerators:
CWI 6-40
CWI 8-40
CWI 13
WP-19

1941 Refrigerators:
1941 "S" and "R" Model Refrigerators:
(See Table I-VI.)
S 3 (Flat top only) See 1940 TDB-3
S 4
S 6-41
R 6-41
1941 "M" and "L" Model Refrigerators:
(See Table 2-VI)
M 6-41
MP 6-41
L 6-41
L 8-41
1941 Cold-Wall Model Refrigerators:
(See Table 3-VI)
C 6-41
CP 6-41 c 9-41
CD 6-41
CPD 6-41
CPD 9-41
CPD 13-41
WP 19

1942 Refrigerators
AH 6
S 7-42
M7-42
M P7-42
D 7-42
DP 7-42
D 9-42
CD 7-42
CPD 7-42
CPD 9-42
CPD 13
WP 19

Refrigerators/Freezers
Published by:
Frigidaire
1951 177 182mb $8.99
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Thumbnail Image of Download Early Frigidaire Refrigerator Service Manual Vol-3 1945 to 1951
This is a three volume comprehensive service manual for Frigidaire Refrigerators from the 1920's thru 1951. The set is a fascinating historical look at early Frigidaire home refrigeration.

Volume 3 Covers:
Full descriptions of 1945-47 I-Line Refrigerators, 1947-1948 J-Line Refrigerators, 1949 K-Line Refrigerators, 1950 M-Line Refrigerators and 1951 O-Line Refrigerators.

This volume is meant to be used with VOLUME 2 which covers more in-depth theory and servicing of rotary compressor models.

VOLUME 1 is located here for the earliest models.

Manual model images and specifications, wiring diagrams, troubleshooting and full servicing information.

Models mentioned:
1945-1946-1947 Refrigerators:
AHI-4
DI-7
CDI-9
AHI-6
DPI-7
CPDI-7
SI-7
DI-9
CPDI-9
MI-7
CDI-7

1948 Refrigerators:
AJ-6
SJ-6
MJ-6
MJ-7
MJ-9
MJ-11
DJ-7
DJ-9
DJ-11
CIJ-10

1949 Refrigerators:
ML-77
ML-93
DL-70
AL-60
ML-60
ML-77P
ML-93P
ML-115
DL-7
DL-86
DL-86P
DL-105
IL-80
IL-100


1950 Refrigerators:
AM-43,
AM-43F
DM-90
DM-90P
DM-107
DM-107P
MM-92
MM-110
AM-60
MM-74
MM-74P
MM-76
MM-76P
SM-60
SM-76
SM-76P
IM-80
IM-100
1M-lOOP

1951 Refrigerators:
AO-43 Apartment House, 4.3 cu. ft.
AO-43F Apartment House, 4.3 cu. ft., Flat Top
AO-60 Apartment House, 6 cu. ft.
SO-60 Standard, 6 cu. ft.
SO-73 Standard, 7.3 cu. ft.
SO-82 Standard, 8.2 cu. ft.
SO-92 Standard, 9.2 cu. ft.
SO-110 Standard, 11 cu. ft.
MO-71 Master, 7.1 cu. ft.
MO-81 Master, 8.1 cu. ft.
MO-81P Master, 8.1 cu. ft. Porcelain
DO-90 Deluxe, 9 cu. ft.
DO-90P Deluxe, 9 cu. ft. Porcelain
DO-107 Deluxe, 10.7 cu. ft.
IO-80 Imperial, 8 cu. ft.
IO-100 Imperial, 10 cu. ft.
Refrigerators/Freezers
Published by:
Frigidaire
1951 177 182mb $8.99
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Thumbnail Image of Download 1948 Westinghouse Laundromat Automatic Washer Owners Manual
Here is the complete owners manual and use and care guide to the 1948 Westinghouse Laundromat. I believe this was the first Westinghouse front-loading washer model to incorporate a single door design.


Automatic Washers
Published by:
Westinghouse
1948 40 21mb $5.99
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Thumbnail Image of Download 1956 Frigidaire Imperial Washer Owners Manual
Here is a special edition of the 1956 Frigidaire washer owners manual. It was made specifically for the Imperial Unimatic model, WI-56.


Automatic Washers
Published by:
Frigidaire
1956 24 14mb $5.99
Add to download cart
Thumbnail Image of Download 1953 General Electric Washer and Dryer owners manual
Carefree Washdays the GE Way! Complete owners manual and use/care guide to both the 1953 General Electric automatic washer and clothes dryer.


Automatic Washers & Dryers
Published by:
General Electric
1953 68 30mb $5.99
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Thumbnail Image of Download Frigidaire Tech-Talk Introducing the WO-65 Automatic Washer
Here is one of the earliest issues of Tech-Talk (#7). It's main focus is the introduction of the WO-65 Frigidaire Automatic Washer.


Automatic Washers
Published by:
Frigidaire
1950 12 13mb $5.99
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Thumbnail Image of Download 1955 Frigidaire Dryer Tech-Talk Service Manual
Here is the complete service manual to the 1955 models of Frigidaire clothes dryers. Models DV-35 and DV-65.

Complete servicing, troubleshooting and wiring diagrams.
Clothes Dryers
Published by:
Frigidaire
1955 16 14mb $5.99
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Thumbnail Image of Download 1957 Control-Tower Frigidaire Dryer Tech-Talk Service Manual
Here is the complete service manual to the 1957 models of Frigidaire clothes dryers. Models DI-57, DD-57 and DS-57, Di-1-57.

Complete servicing, troubleshooting and wiring diagrams.
Clothes Dryers
Published by:
Frigidaire
1957 24 22mb $5.99
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Thumbnail Image of Download Westinghouse Service Bulletin
Here are some very notable Westinghouse Service Bulletins displaying new Agitator information, model features charts, cycle charts and specifications for Westinghouse Automatic Washers.

Also included is a 1967 Dishwasher Utility bulletin entitled "You and Your New Dishwasher" - Helpful hints to get the best results.
Automatic Washers
Published by:
Westinghouse
1969 23 20mb $5.99
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Thumbnail Image of Download 1960s Hotpoint Washer-Dryer-Dishwasher Identifier
Here are models and images of the following Hotpoint Washers, Dryers and Dishwashers:

Automatic Washers: 1960 to 1963
Dryers: 1960 to 1963
Dishwashers: various 1958 to 1965 models
Automatic Washers & Dryers
Published by:
Hotpoint
1960 31 16mb $5.99
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Thumbnail Image of Download 1962 Dexter Quick-Twin and Standard Wringer Washers Brochures
Whimsical brochures by Dexter highlight features and specifications of their Philco-made wringer washers.

Models include:
3-D9, 3-D9P, 3-D7, 3-D7P, 3-D5, 3-D5P, 3-D3, 3-D3P, 3-D2, 3-D2P, 3-D1, 3-D1P, 1-DO, 1-DOP, 3-D4
Wringer Washers
Published by:
Dexter
1962 16 39mb $5.99
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Thumbnail Image of Download Blackstone Automatic Washers 250-350 Service Manual
Complete service manual to Blackstone washers from 1954 to 1958. Models 250 and 350.


Automatic Washers
Published by:
Blackstone
1957 52 39mb $7.99
Add to download cart
Thumbnail Image of Download 1960 Blackstone Automatic Washer Service Manual
Service manual to Blackstone Automatic washers models: WAA50, WAA60, WAC45, WAC55, WAC65 and WAC75.

Service manual claims this particular transmission design spins the tub at 680rpm which is one the better water extracting washers of the time.
Automatic Washers
Published by:
Blackstone
1960 23 17mb $5.99
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Thumbnail Image of Download Appliance Manufacturer Magazine - July 1957
Appliance Manufacturer is a fun magazine to read for any collector or enthusiast of vintage appliances, electronics and other vintage home products. This highly entertaining magazine covered the design and manufacturing areas of Major Appliances, Small Appliances, Small Electrics, Radios, Televisions and other electric home products from the mid-20th century.

Of particular interest:

Very cool article on GM Frigidaire appliance designers and how they work together in an atmosphere of creativeness.

Maytag introduces their Halo-of-Heat dryer.

GE Kitchen Center wins awards for GE designers and engineers.

Surprising number of new appliances at Chicago Summer Market show.
Trade Publications
Published by:
Appliance Manufacturer
1957 106 140mb $12.99
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Thumbnail Image of Download 1977 Hotpoint Appliances Catalog
Here is a complete product catalog from Hotpoint showing their complete line of major appliances.

Photos, descriptions and detailed specifications are included.
Full Catalog
Published by:
Hotpoint
1977 52 83mb $9.96
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Thumbnail Image of Download 1956 Philco Agitator Automatic Washer Service Manual
Here is the comprehensive service manual to all Philco agitator washers, pre-Automagic models.

Models include: W266, W264, W262, W268.

Sections include: Installation, Specifications, Major Assemblies, Service Procedures, Wiring Diagrams, Troubleshooting, Supplement model information.
Automatic Washers
Published by:
Philco
1956 41 24mb $7.99
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Thumbnail Image of Download 1956 Bendix Front Loading Automatic Washer Service Manual
Here is the comprehensive service manual to all 1956 Bendix automatic washers.

Models include: WFG-D.

Sections include: Cabinet, Clothes Door, Electrical Circuits and Cycles, Electrical Controls, Installation, Latch, Motor, Pump, Transmission, Specifications, Suspended Unit Assembly, Service Procedures, Water Inlet, Water Control.
Automatic Washers
Published by:
Bendix
1956 41 29mb $7.99
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Thumbnail Image of Download 1957 General Electric Dishwasher Service Manual
Complete service manual to 1957 General Electric built-in roll-out dishwashers.

Models include: SU80P and SU60P.

Sections include: Introduction, General Information, Specifications, Washing Process, Food Soils, Stain Removal, Service Quality of Dinnerware, Operations, Capacity, Detergent, Running the Dishwasher, Operating Cycle, Component Parts, Wiring Diagrams, Installation, Servicing, Troubleshooting and Parts.
Dishwashers
Published by:
General Electric
1957 79 64mb $7.99
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Thumbnail Image of Download 1973 Waste King Dishwasher Service Manual
Here is the comprehensive service manual to servicing most of the 1970's Waste King dishwashers. Updates through 1977 are included in this manual.

Models include: 410, 511,510, 575, 610, 711, 710, 777, 750, 878, 810, 811, 910, 911, 950, 979

Sections include full troubleshooting, repair, how to test and wiring diagrams.
Dishwashers
Published by:
Waste King
1973 63 47mb $7.99
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Thumbnail Image of Download Electrical Dealer Magazine - January 1955
Electrical Dealer Magazine is a fun magazine to read for any collector or enthusiast of vintage appliances, electronics and other vintage home products. This highly entertaining magazine covered the retail sales and merchandising areas of Major Appliances, Small Appliances, Small Electrics, Radios, Televisions and other electric home products from the mid-20th century. This was the Life and Look Magazine of the appliance world, in the same large size 10x13 format.

Highlights of this issue, including Norge, Whirlpool, Speed Queen and Hamilton Laundry ads...

Sales And Profit Outlook For '55
1955 Selling Schedule
Trade-Ins
Personalized Selling
Is Discount Selling Losing Its Punch?
What The Public Thinks About Discounting
The Winner: The Man Who Stays In Business
Mathematics Of Price Cutting
Margins, Franchises, and Fair Trade
"Sales Will Rise For Those Who Work"
Captive Election Audience Sees New Line
Complete Food Plan Training Pays Off
Check And Counter Check
They Call It 8 to 5
His Automatic Washers Speak
Contact Plan Produces TV Sales Daily
Selection And Color Boost White Goods Sales
Sales Clinic
News And Trends
New Products Section
News Of The Month
Trade Publications
Published by:
Electrical Dealer
1955 112 106mb $12.99
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Thumbnail Image of Download 1970 Frigidaire Skinny-Mini Washer Dryer Service Manual
In 1970 Frigidaire introduced the world's very first all-in-one stacked washer/dryer unit. It was called the Skinny-mini and used a one piece plastic molded agitator and tub combination referred to as an "agi-tub".

Here is the Tech-Talk service manual to the very first of these models.

Models include: LCT-2 and LCT8-2.
Automatic Washers & Dryers
Published by:
Frigidaire
1970 99 75mb $7.99

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